PHT Morning Skate: MacKinnon won’t need surgery; Is Voracek on trade block?

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Here’s the NBC Sports Stanley Cup playoff update for May 15

• Avs forward Nathan MacKinnon will not need surgery to repair his injured shoulder. (NHL.com)

• Should the Philadelphia Flyers put Jakub Voracek on the trade block? (Broad Street Hockey)

• What will Jordan Binnington‘s next contract look like? The Hockey News takes a deeper look. (The Hockey News)

Jaden Schwartz has helped carry the St. Louis Blues to the Western Conference Final. (TSN)

• ESPN gives us a list of the weirdest controversies in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. (ESPN)

• The Predators are hoping that Pekka Rinne can help them hoist the Stanley Cup next year. (On the Forecheck)

• Stars head coach Jim Montgomery made the transition from the NCAA to the NHL look easier than it really is. (Defending Big D)

• If the Pens trade Phil Kessel, it can’t simply be addition by subtraction. (Pittsburgh Tribune)

• Capitals goalie prospects Vitek Vanecek and Ilya Samsonov found a way to get along in the AHL this season. (NBC Sports Washington)

• Is Dan Girardi‘s 13 years of experience an asset or a liability for the Tampa Bay Lightning? (Tampa Bay Times)

• The Red Wings could opt to trade Andreas Athanasiou or Anthony Mantha in order to get themselves a proven defenseman. (Detroit News)

• What will the Chicago Blackhawks do with the third overall pick in the draft? (NBC Sports Chicago)

• What will Vegas’ roster look like if they can’t find a way to bring back William Karlsson. (Sinbin.Vegas)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Flyers add Yeo, Therrien to coaching staff; Gordon returns to AHL

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The Philadelphia Flyers will have plenty of head coaching experience and lot of familiar names behind their bench for the 2019-20 season.

The team announced on Monday that former head coaches Michel Therrien and Mike Yeo have been added to Alain Vigneault’s staff as assistants, where they will be joining returning coaches Ian Laperriere (assistant), Kim Dillabaugh (goaltending) and Adam Patterson (video).

“I am excited to add Michel and Mike on our coaching staff to work alongside Ian Laperriere, Kim Dillabaugh and Adam Patterson,” said Vigneault in a statement released by the team.

“Both men have enjoyed success at all levels throughout their coaching careers, including working together at the NHL level. Each brings a considerable amount of experience and knowledge to our group, which I have no doubt will help lead our team to immediate success.”

The Flyers also announced that Scott Gordon, who finished the 2018-19 season as the team’s interim head coach replacing Dave Hakstol, will return to be the head coach of the Flyers’ AHL team in Lehigh Valley. Philadelphia finished the season with a 25-22-4 mark under Gordon, briefly making a little bit of a run to climb back into playoff contention before once again fading down the stretch. The team definitely had a better record after he took over, but a lot of that was due to the significantly better goaltending than it had received earlier in the season under Hakstol, and not necessarily the coaching.

Vigneault was announced as the team’s newest head coach in mid-April.

The trio of Vigneault, Therrien, and Yeo has more than 2,500 games of head coaching experience at the NHL level with multiple teams (Vigneault with the Vancouver Canucks and New York Rangers; Yeo with the Minnesota Wild and St. Louis Blues; Therrien with the Montreal Canadiens and Pittsburgh Penguins) throughout their careers. It is also another sign that the NHL’s coaching recycling bin remains very, very, very active.

Related: Flyers hire Alain Vigneault as newest head coach

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

AP/CP survey: Players pan delay of game, goalie interference

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The pace and excitement of 3-on-3 overtime isn’t just a thrill for hockey fans – NHL players love it, too.

An Associated Press/Canadian Press survey of NHLPA representatives from all 31 teams found that 97% of those polled enjoy the league’s current overtime format during the regular season. The survey also found there are other rules the players are less thrilled with, ranging from delay-of-game penalties to confusion about goalie interference.

For Arizona Coyotes defenseman Kevin Connauton, the worst rule in hockey is resolving a game with a shootout when overtime fails to produce a winner.

”I don’t really like the shootout,” he said. ”I think you just play 3-on-3 and eventually someone will score.”

The survey found that 30 players like the 3-on-3 setup. Only Philadelphia defenseman Radko Gudas said he did not, preferring the previous 4-on-4 setup better. He and said having fewer players on the ice is too much like ”summertime hockey.”

”You work your bag off 60 minutes 5-on-5 and then all of a sudden it’s 3-on-3, a speedier, faster guy pretty much wins,” he said. ”I think 4-on-4 would be more hockey-like situations than 3-on-3.”

Still, his peers said they love it. Playing a five-minute 3-on-3 period provides a fair way to end the game while allowing fans to see some pure skill, Toronto Maple Leafs center John Tavares said.

”(It’s) exciting and you see the best players in the world with that type of time and space,” he said. ”It goes to show it’s a good way to end games. There’s no perfect science to this. We want a winner, but we can’t play forever. It’s a great way to showcase the talent, the skill of the game.”

The pace can be tough for the guys on the ice, New Jersey Devils goaltender Cory Schneider said.

”I hate it as a goalie, but I like it as a hockey fan,” he said. ”I think it’s better than the shootout, for sure. And I know it’s not perfect, but it gets you a decision, it gets people excited, you see some amazing skill and the way the league is now, it’s a great showcase for what these guys can do.”

The NHL moved away from 4-on-4 overtime in the 2015-16 regular season in a bid to create more space on the ice, allow for more goals and reduce the number of games going to shootouts. In the postseason, overtime is in 20-minute, sudden-death periods at 5-on-5. There are no shootouts.

Dylan DeMelo of the Ottawa Senators loves 3-on-3, but said there is one tweak he’d like to make. The defenseman said he wants to see a rule that would stop players from taking the puck over center ice and then back again to regroup. He thinks that would make OT even more entertaining.

There are a number of other rules players would love to see changed, including 63.2 that stipulates a delay of game penalty when a puck is shot or batted over the glass.

”I don’t think it should be a penalty. I think it should be the same as an icing. Whistle, faceoff in your end, no ability to change,” said Colorado Avalanche defenseman Ian Cole, one of five players (16%) who said the rule is the worst in hockey. ”A penalty for a play that has a high chance to happen in a course of a game or a (penalty kill) or whatever, it seems a little drastic.”

For other players, the uncertainty around what constitutes goalie interference is particularly irritating. Three players, or 10% of those in the survey, said the inconsistency was their least-favorite part of the NHL rule book.

”What is goaltender interference and what’s not?” said Edmonton defenseman Darnell Nurse. ”Maybe having more of a clear line, but any time you talk about something within the game, things happen so fast out there that judgment calls and whatnot, they’re hard to make.”

According to the league, there are only two situations where goaltender interference should result in a disallowed goal: if an attacking player stops the goalie from being able to move freely within his crease or defend his goal, or an attacking player intentionally or deliberately makes contact with the goalie.

Some players say what counts as interference in one game might not be the same in the next.

On Friday, Flyers goalie Cam Talbot tweeted his dissatisfaction with how the rule was applied in the Maple Leafs’ 2-1 win over the Boston Bruins.

”Once again the NHL goalie interference review is flawed,” wrote Talbot, who was not part of the AP/CP survey. ”Someone that’s played the game in the blue paint should be in the situation room. Games are being lost in the playoffs and it’s not right. (hash)inconsistent.”

Three players said what they most dislike are offside reviews. Nine others named other rules, including tripping being called alongside diving, and the ban on time outs being used when the puck is iced. Eleven players did not provide a specific answer.

”Rules are the rules. I just follow them,” said winger Anders Lee of the New York Islanders.

More AP NHL: http://www.apnews.com/NHL and http://www.twitter.com/AP-Sports

Flyers turn to winner Vigneault to snap championship drought

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VOORHEES, N.J. (AP) — The Tampa Bay Lightning team that just flamed out in the first round of the playoffs is dotted with former New York Rangers who played in the 2014 Stanley Cup Final:

Ryan McDonagh, Dan Girardi, Anton Stralman, J.T. Miller all helped the Rangers to get within three wins of their first championship since 1994. Five years later, a new team and a stunning elimination. They were used to deeper runs in New York with Alain Vigneault running the show. He led the Rangers to the Cup Final in his first season and bumped the win total by eight in his second.

After a year out of coaching, Vigneault takes over a fallen Philadelphia Flyers franchise. He seems to expect a similar quick fix.

”I was looking for was an opportunity to win; an opportunity in the short term to win a Stanley Cup,” Vigneault said Thursday.

Vigneault also led the Vancouver Canucks to the Stanley Cup Final, is a former NHL coach of the year and will spend the summer as the head coach for Team Canada at the world championships.

”It’s unusual and difficult to find coaches like Alain,” Flyers general manager Chuck Fletcher said.

Indeed, Vigneault has done it all on the bench except win the Stanley Cup and he joins a franchise mired in one of the longest championship droughts in the league. The Flyers haven’t won it all since 1975 or even played for the Stanley Cup since 2010. Even worse, they missed the playoffs this season and haven’t made it past the second round since 2012.

And he thinks the Flyers can win in the short term?

Maybe, because the talent is there: Claude Giroux, Jake Voracek, James van Riemsdyk and Sean Couturier all have some heavy miles on their skates but are still productive veterans. There’s still untapped potential in a group of promising 20-somethings that include Travis Sanheim, Oskar Lindblom, Shayne Gostisbehere and Nolan Patrick. All have shown flashes of stardom along with infuriating inconsistency.

”I can get them to be more consistent. The way that I prepare a team for games I believe permits a player to understand what he needs to do against that team to be successful,” Vigneault said.

Couturier will get an early peek at Vigneault’s system at next month’s world championships in Slovakia. So will Carter Hart, the 20-year-old rookie goalie who nearly carried the Flyers into the playoffs after his December call up. He won eight straight games and pushed the Flyers (37-37-8 for 82 points) to the verge of a wild card spot until they collapsed over the final two weeks.

The Flyers used a record eight goalies this season. Vigneault knows a true No. 1 should be enough to carry the load in a championship chase. Vigneault rode Henrik Lundqvist in New York to within three wins of a championship and Roberto Luongo had four playoff shutouts when the Canucks reached the Final in 2011.

”I was very fortunate to have maybe two Hall of Fame goaltenders,” Vigneault said. ”Maybe we have a young goaltender that’s got a tremendous amount of potential and might become one of the top goalies in the league.”

One thing Vigneault won’t do is ask former Flyers coach Dave Hakstol (fired in December) and former GM Ron Hextall (fired in November) for a scouting report on the team. Both men are part of his staff at worlds. Giroux, the Flyers captain, is the only player Vigneault has called.

Vigneault, who turns 58 in May, has coached 16 NHL seasons for the Montreal Canadiens, Canucks and Rangers. His teams made the playoffs 11 times and he was named NHL coach of the year in 2006-2007 with Vancouver.

”Players look for direction. If you give a player and a team a path and you do this, you do it this way, you put in the time, you’re going to have success,” Vigneault said. ”You do the same thing with your team, they’re going to follow you.”

History suggests players will follow Vigneault. He took two teams in major hockey markets to the Final and did it in large part because of a hot goalie and an overachieving roster. The Rangers wore down because almost every series went the distance (four Game 7s) and Vigneault took them way behind their talent level.

Vigneault has an offensive superstar in Giroux (82 points) but Patrick (a former No. 2 pick) and van Riemsdyk have more name value than skill. No matter, the coach always pays the price in Philly: Vigneault is the fifth coach since the start of the 2013 season, and he’d like this commitment to last.

”You know what we have to do? We have to win,” he said.

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

PHT Morning Skate: Flames need more from Gaudreau; Is Vigneault right choice for Flyers?

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Here’s the NBC Sports Stanley Cup playoff update for April 17

• The NHL Awards will be back in Las Vegas this year. (NHL.com)

• The Toronto Maple Leafs have found a way to shut down the Boston Bruins’ top line. (Bruins Daily)

• The key to John Tavares getting the upper hand on Patrice Bergeron is taking short shifts. (TSN)

• The Calgary Flames need Johnny Gaudreau to step up if they’re going to beat the Colorado Avalanche. (Sportsnet)

Matt Nieto‘s speed has been a weapon for the Avalanche. (Mile High Hockey)

• The Hurricanes are fortunate that they have an extra day between Game 3 and 4 of their series against the Capitals. (Raleigh News & Observer)

• Don’t blame Alex Ovechkin for Andrei Svechnikov‘s injury, blame fighting in hockey. (NBC Sports Washington)

• The Dallas Stars’ shot selection was a problem in Game 3 against the Nashville Predators. (The Point Hockey)

• How did the Calgary Flames get so far ahead of the Edmonton Oilers? (Edmonton Journal)

• Did the Flyers make the right choice by hiring Alain Vigneault to be their head coach? (Broad Street Hockey)

• Travis Yost argues that William Karlsson could be a great option for the Buffalo Sabres. (Buffalo News)

• Finally, Men in Blazers sits down with Ovechkin to discuss achieving his career dream of winning the Stanley Cup and the celebrations that followed:

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.