PHT Morning Skate: Story behind 2020 Winter Classic logo; Hobey Baker nominees

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• The story behind the 2020 Winter Classic logo. [NHL.com]

• Chris Drury has been named general manager of the 2019 U.S. National Team. Drury is currently an assistant GM with the New York Rangers. [USA Hockey]

• The Maple Leafs’ problems could be bigger than their last four games. [Yahoo]

• Adam Fox, Quinn Hughes and Cale Makar are among the 10 nominees for the 2019 Hobey Baker Award. [Hobey Baker]

• What would today’s NHL look like if the salary cap didn’t exist? [USA Today]

• This is a prime opportunity for the Winnipeg Jets to take control of the Central Division. [Sportsnet]

• The story of Brady Keeper is one you’ll want to read today. [TSN]

• The Vegas Golden Knights’ top line is stepping up at the right time. [Sin Bin Vegas]

• Philadelphia Flyers forward Justin Bailey has reached out to a Buffalo-area youth hockey player who was subjected to racial slurs and taunts during a game in January. [NHL.com]

• As they chase a playoff spot, the Chicago Blackhawks find themselves scoreboard watching. [NBC Chicago]

Erik Cernak has emerged as an impactful member of the Tampa Bay Lightning blue line. [Raw Charge]

• There’s no slowing down the Calgary Flames, even after clinching a playoff spot. [Calgary Herald]

• Should the Rangers shut down some of their top players with the playoffs out of the picture? [Blueshirt Banter]

• Ryan Donato has made the most of his new opportunity with the Minnesota Wild. [The Hockey News]

• Finally, Mason is back with round two of his adventures on ice:

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Leafs have problems; Crosby’s Hart Trophy case

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Sidney Crosby‘s offensive production will have him in the mix for the Hart Trophy, but it’s his defensive contributions that make him a legitimate threat for the award. (The Hockey News)

• Take a look inside the new arena construction in Seattle. (NHLSeattle.com)

• The Leafs are going through a tough stretch, but the fact that they are going through these issues isn’t necessarily a bad thing. (Leafs Nation)

• On the flip side, the Leafs defense is just bad, and that’s probably the main reason why they won’t win the Stanley Cup this season. (Spector’s Hockey)

• 3-on-3 overtime has been a problem for the Wild this year, but here’s a way to fix that. (Hockey Wilderness)

Jared Spurgeon had his doubters, but he’s proved so many people wrong. (StarTribune)

• It’s time for Claude Julien to give Jesperi Kotkaniemi some added responsibility. (Habs Eyes on the Prize)

• White hockey sticks have become all the rage with some of the youngsters in the NHL. (Japers’ Rink)

• The WHL didn’t grant Matt Savoie exceptional status, so he decided to commit to the University of Denver. (Mile High Hockey)

• The AHL’s Hershey Bears have made it a point to help people with disabilities play hockey. (WBALTV)

• In 1948, Larry Kwong become the first person of color to play in the NHL. (Blue Shirt Banter)

• Alex Nylander believes he’s ready to become a full-time NHLer. (Buffalo Hockey Beat)

• Steve Mayer makes sure that major musical acts get to play at big NHL events. “I don’t care where we are, we’re going to do the same thing we’ve done the last two years. And we’re going to go bigger and grander and better, because what I have now is a music community who’s now really into this.” (Forbes)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

PHT Morning Skate: Pastrnak on injury; Nashville’s Turris problem

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

David Pastrnak on his thumb injury: “Obviously I let the guys down a bit. It’s a tough time. It’s not an injury that happened on the ice, so I took full responsibility for that. That’s what hurt me most. Could I have avoided it? I wish [that I had]. But obviously things happen. The fact that I could let somebody down, I definitely hate that. The first couple of weeks were tough.” [NBC Boston]

• Just in time as the playoffs approach, James Neal returns to the Calgary Flames after a 14-game absence, hoping to find his scoring touch again. [NHL.com]

• When the postseason does arrive, who will get the starting gig in net for the Flames? [Featurd]

• A good look at the teams playing well with the Stanley Cup Playoffs less than a month away. [TSN]

• Playoffs might be out of reach but the Vancouver Canucks are now acting as a spoiler. [Sportsnet]

• Meet the only female full-time Zamboni driver in the NHL. [ESPN]

• The younger members of the St. Louis Blues are really enjoying this playoff push. [Post-Dispatch]

• The San Jose Sharks are trying not to think too far into the future when it comes to a possible first-round matchup with the Vegas Golden Knights. [NBC Bay Area]

Mathew Barzal, Josh Bailey and Nick Leddy need to give more to the New York Islanders as the playoffs approach. [Islanders Insight]

• Examining who’s chasing and possessing the puck the most for the Columbus Blue Jackets. [1st Ohio Battery]

• The Nashville Predators have a Kyle Turris problem. [A to Z Sports]

• A product of the “Ovechkin Effect” in Washington D.C., the Capitals signed Yale product and local boy Joe Snively on Monday. [Japers’ Rink]

• Which AHL players could step up and make an impact with the Edmonton Oilers? [Oilers Nation]

• Finally, there were a good number of bloopers in the NHL over the last week:

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Kane using hockey as distraction; impact of DeBrincat, Strome

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Carey Price got to meet Jacques Plante’s son over the weekend. (NHL.com)

Evander Kane is using hockey as a distraction from the heartbreaking situation he and his wife are going through. (Mercury News)

• The Sharks probably want to avoid playing the Golden Knights in the first round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs. (NBC Sports Bay Area)

• Now that Nikita Kucherov and Connor McDavid have hit the 100-point mark, The Hockey News looks at which other players can reach that number. (The Hockey News)

• The Canadiens will likely miss the playoffs, but at least they’re heading on the right track. (Habs Eyes on the Prize)

• Even though the Devils have taken a step back this season, their fans need to be patient with Ray Shero. (Pucks and Pitchforks)

• The Golden Knights are one of the more aggressive teams when it comes to pulling their goaltender. (Sinbin.Vegas)

Josh Anderson continues to be one of the key contributors on the Columbus Blue Jackets roster. (The Cannon)

• The Boston Bruins really embraced the aura of Conor McGregor on Saturday night. (Bruins Daily)

• Shane Wright is embracing the challenge of being an exceptional player. (Canadian Press)

Alex DeBrincat and Dylan Strome have changed the path the Blackhawks are on. (Sportsnet)

• Finally, here’s Lee Stecklein with the OT goal to give the Minnesota Whitecaps the 2019 NWHL Isobel Cup: (The Ice Garden)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Hockey families get creative in solving time, cost concerns

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By Stephen Whyno (AP Hockey Writer)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Megan Lincoln couldn’t put her son into hockey right away when he wanted to play.

She didn’t have the time to take off from work to shuttle him to practice or the money to pour into a traditionally expensive sport.

”Nothing is cheap,” Lincoln said. ”There’s nothing about hockey that is cheap. Maybe some laces.”

But Reggie Hunter became a hockey player when the family found out Snider Hockey was offering free equipment and instruction 20 minutes from their New Jersey home. He learned to play multiple positions over time as his great-grandfather drove him to and from the rink in Pennsauken. That was seven years ago. Hunter, now 21, went on to play junior hockey.

Many families wrestle with the time and money needed to play youth sports, but those challenges can be even more significant when it comes to hockey, with all of its equipment and rinks that are sometimes far away. For the less wealthy, having a child who dreams of hockey can look like a nightmare.

”The challenge is that hockey is a very unique sport and it’s a very expensive sport,” said NHL diversity ambassador Willie O’Ree, who broke the league’s color barrier in 1958. ”To go into a sport shop and outfit a 10- to a 13-year-old boy or girl, it costs about $800, and a lot of these families, they just can’t afford the money.”

The cost of protective equipment, sticks and ice time is one factor that keeps hockey lagging behind sports such as basketball and soccer in the U.S. among minority children. Snider Hockey program director Dan Rudd estimates the expenses of travel hockey alone can cost a family $2,000-$3,000 a year.

Steps are being taken to address those concerns, including programs like Snider Hockey in Philadelphia, Detroit Ice Dreams and Hockey is for Everyone, Future Goals and Learn to Play from the NHL and NHL Players’ Association. Many outfit kids with all they need to get on the ice.

Detroit Ice Dreams vice president and program manager Cynthia Wardlaw likened the cost of her children playing hockey to a car bill or a mortgage bill.

”I would’ve never been able to afford hockey if it wasn’t for a program like this because it wouldn’t have ever fit in my budget,” Wardlaw said. ”No matter how much my kid might’ve enjoyed it or liked it or loved it, I wouldn’t have been able to afford it. We have a lot of parents that are thankful for our program because they would’ve never been able to experience the game of hockey because hockey is very expensive.”

Neal Henderson, who founded the Fort Dupont Ice Hockey Club in Washington in 1978, said his organization outfits kids from head to foot with safe equipment. Some rinks rely on donated or used equipment that can be passed down from older to younger players.

Snider Hockey provides equipment, too, as part of almost $5 million in annual expenses. It also helps parents trying to figure out what to buy.

”Sometimes the parents don’t have the experience in the sport to understand what to look for, so they need mentors, they need subject matter experts,” said Jim Britt, the since-retired first employee of Snider Hockey. ”They need coaching along the way to make sure they know a $500 piece of equipment isn’t necessarily better than a $300 piece of equipment or a $200 piece of equipment.”

Coaches are also part-time drivers at Snider Hockey, and parents run carpools for practices and games. Detroit Ice Dreams Founder Jason McCrimmon said he barters with city-run rinks by offering basic classes to get favorable ice time that allows kids to practice and play after school – hours more favorable than early in the morning or late at night.

Small-ice practices, where a team needs just a third of the rink, also helps organizations keep costs down.

”You divide the dollars you spend on an hour of ice by 60 instead of 20,” Snider Hockey executive vice president Jan Koziara said. ”It’s a huge return.”

NHL, NHLPA and USA Hockey assistance goes a long way as the organizations try to grow the game. Henderson believes the onus is still on parents to explore options.

”The parents have to make a sacrifice, and they have to make a sacrifice to become involved,” Henderson said. ”(A child who asks their parents to play) knows the answer will be they’re too busy or they’ve got to work or they think that the price is too high. They have no idea of cost, and they don’t know what a commitment would be.”

Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports