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PHT Stanley Cup Tracker: Ovechkin takes Stanley home, Cup visits Capital Gazette office

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The PHT Stanley Cup tracker will keep tabs on how the Washington Capitals spend their summer celebrating

Alex Ovechkin picked quite the time to win the Stanley Cup with the Washington Capitals.

With the World Cup in Russia this summer, Ovechkin got his chance to take hockey’s holy grail to the pinnacle of soccer competition on Saturday at the World Cup’s Fan Fest venue.

Speaking to NHL.com’s Tom Gulitti, Ovechkin said he’s dreamed of being in the position he is now in.

“I’m going to share it with all the people who I know, people who I don’t know,” he said. “But I’m just going to share my moment with them because lots of fans haven’t seen it, never touched it.”

There was another special moment on Saturday.

Ovechkin visited the Dynamo Hockey School in Novogorsk, his hometown rink, where he was met by his father, Mikhail.

Ovechkin handed the Cup to his father for the first time. According to a report, Mikhail had to be hospitalized before the playoffs began was deemed too ill to travel to watch his son hoist the cup.

Washington Capitals equipment manager Craig “Woody” Leydig took his turn with the Stanley Cup on July 3 and he took it to the temporary offices of the Capital Gazette after a horrific shooting left five of the paper’s employees dead last week.

July Fourth was John Carlson‘s day with the Stanley Cup. He started by sharing it with local firefighters, the Children’s National Medical Center and a fundraiser benefiting DIPG.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Could Capitals be on verge of losing John Carlson?

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(UPDATE: No, he’s staying. Eight-year, $64 million extension for Carlson.)

While the sweet aroma of winning the Stanley Cup isn’t likely to fade any time soon, the brief stench of the business side of hockey could once again crop up in Washington.

Already having lost Stanley Cup-winning head coach Barry Trotz last week, the Capitals could be on the verge of losing top-scoring defenseman John Carlson from the 2017-18 season as well.

Maybe.

With no deal in place to extend the skilled rearguard, Carlson’s agent, Rick Curran, said while they’re still trying to hash out a deal with the Capitals, his client, who led all NHL d-men with 68 points this past season, is going to listen to other teams after the interview period commenced at 12:00 a.m. on Sunday morning.

On Friday, Capitals general manager Brian MacLellan said a deal with Carlson was “close” to being achieved.

“Hopefully we can get it done here over the next few days. We’re really close,” he said.

But as of Sunday morning, there’s still no deal in place for the man who set a Caps franchise record for most points by a defenseman in the playoffs with 20.

MacLellan has made room for Carlson. Needing the necessary cap space to give him his raise, MacLellan dealt backup netminder Philipp Grubauer and veteran defenseman Brooks Orpik to the Colorado Avalanche — the later of which had a $5.5 million cap hit attached to him.

For now, the savings account hasn’t been touched.

For Carlson, he has earned the right to test the free agent waters, and Washington obviously hasn’t met whatever demands 28-year-old has for his new deal.

It’s important to point out, as the Associated Press’ Stephen Whyno did Sunday, that Washington is the only team that can give Carlson eight years of term in a new deal. As Whyno said, this shouldn’t be overlooked.

Losing Carlson would be a big blow, so it’s kind of surprising it’s gotten to this point from the Capitals side, although Carlson could be doing what he’s earned — looking to see if the grass is greener on the other side — and using this time as leverage in talks with Washington.

A simple formula: Player wants the team to meet demands, the team isn’t there yet, forcing the player to play hardball, in turn forcing the team’s hand, or something like that, roughly speaking.

Caps beat writer for the Washington Post Isabelle Khurshudyan wrote Sunday that despite the noise surrounding Carlson, she still expects the d-man to re-sign in the nation’s capital.

#CarlsonWatch continues for now.

Have your say here:


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Contract request led to breakup between Barry Trotz, Capitals

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Barry Trotz’s desire for a big salary raise and five-year extension was the beginning of the end of his tenure with the Washington Capitals.

Trotz, who resigned on Monday after earning a two-year extension that was triggered by the Capitals’ Stanley Cup victory, wanted to be paid as one of the NHL’s top coaches, but the team was hesitant to make that kind of commitment. It was reported that Trotz was earning $1.5 million per season and the new deal would have only increased his salary by $300,000 a year.

The money and the term requested was a little too much for the Capitals.

“There are probably three, four guys that are making that money, so it’s the upper echelon. It’s the big-revenue teams,” Capitals general manager Brian MacLellan said, referring to the salaries of coaches like Mike Babcock, Claude Julien and Joel Quenneville.

“I don’t think all teams pay that type of money and years. Certain teams are open to it and the rest of the league isn’t,” he added.

MacLellan described the five-year contract ask as a “sticking point.”

“You have a coach that’s been here four years, you do another five, that nine years,” he said. “There’s not many coaches that have that lasting ability. It’s a long time and it’s a lot of money to be committing to a coach.”

[Barry Trotz steps down as Capitals head coach]

If you look at the Capitals’ head coaching history over the last 16 years, they haven’t gone out of their way to open up the checkbook to pay for a big-name, high-priced coach. Before Trotz arrived in 2014, you had Adam Oates, Dale Hunter, Bruce Boudreau, Glen Hanlon and Bruce Cassidy all getting their first NHL head coaching gigs in D.C.

MacLellan said he was hopeful that both sides could work out a short-term deal, but Trotz clearly wanted security and to rightly use the leverage of a Cup victory to cash in. The GM did note that he accepted Trotz’s resignation so he’s free to pursue offers from other teams to coach next season.

As for where the Capitals go next, Todd Reirden is the front-runner to replace Trotz. Bumped up to “associate coach” in 2016, the organization values him and has been grooming him to become a head coach, either with the franchise or elsewhere. MacLellan said Reirden will get a formal interview.

“We’ll see how the talk goes with him and then we’ll make a decision based on that,” he said. “If it goes well, we’ll pursue Todd. If it doesn’t, then we’ll open it up a little bit.”

MORE:Where does NHL’s coaching carousel stop after Trotz resignation?

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Sean Leahy is a writer forPro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line atphtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Ovechkin, Holtby set to guest on The Tonight Show

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There will be some must-see TV on Monday night.

Alex Ovechkin, made famous in recent hours by such exploits a this and this, and Braden Holtby, who has done this, and this in roughly the same timeframe, will stumble their way onto the set of NBC’s The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Monday.

The two 2018 Stanley Cup champions will grace the legendary stage at 11:35 p.m. ET. 

[RELATED: Capitals enjoy day with Stanley Cup at Nationals game]

It remains to be seen if either man will have sobered up by the airing of the episode.

There’s evidence out there that suggests the Conn Smythe winner Ovechkin took a slight break from his onslaught on liquor bottles and swimming in two-inch deep bodies of water.

Meanwhile, Capitals forward Jakub Vrana did many things on Saturday, including getting tattoos of their Stanley Cup triumph with Andre Burakovsky.

His whole Instagram story is something to behold, and if you have some free seconds, should watch it in its entirety.

Here’s a sneak peek:

This might be the greatest Stanley Cup victory celebration since this:


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Barry Trotz is having too much fun, not thinking about future

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Barry Trotz doesn’t want to make any rash decisions.

And so while the Washington Capitals Stanley Cup-winning head coach was once again pressed about his future with the organization on Saturday, he let reporters probing his contract status (he doesn’t have one for the upcoming season) know that he was still in no shape to speak about the subject.

Per the Washington Post’s Isabelle Khurshudyan:

“I’m not in any state to talk. I always talked about having really good clarity and calm and all that. I don’t have a lot of clarity right now. That’s self-inflicted.”

Proper hydrating became a bit of a running theme with Trotz during their Stanley Cup run, often telling anyone who would listen to avoid dehydration.

But it sounds like Trotz has been hydrating with more than just water since he led his team to the Cup on Thursday. Apparently, he might be partying just as hard as Alex Ovechkin and the rest of the Capitals.

You can’t blame him, of course. It took the man 20 years to win the big one, so he’s going to soak it all in. And there’s lots of time for him and the Caps to consider his future if Trotz wants to keep on keeping on.

There’s a lot of work for the Capitals to do this summer if they want to take a run and a second straight title. Bringing Trotz back would be a wise first step.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck