Ryan Callahan

PHT Decade in Review: Most significant trades in hockey

As 2019 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at the past decade. We’ll remember the best players and teams, most significant goals, and biggest transactions that have happened since 2010. Let us know your memories in the comments.

Best Hockey Trades

Seth Jones for Ryan Johansen

The Nashville Predators and Columbus Blue Jackets each had a glaring need and were able to help each other when Seth Jones and Ryan Johansen were traded for one another. From Columbus’ perspective, Johansen was not a favorite of coach John Tortorella and already had a lengthy contract dispute. Nashville had an abundance of talent on the blueline and needed to find a top line centerman. When a trade of this magnitude happens, one team usually regrets the move but, in this situation, both teams were left quite pleased.

Martin St. Louis for Ryan Callahan

It takes a lot of extenuating circumstances for two teams in the thick of a playoff race to trade their captains, but in 2014, the New York Rangers and Tampa Bay Lightning completed the transaction. Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman created a dispute with Martin St. Louis when he left the future Hall-Of-Famer off Team Canada’s original roster for the Sochi Olympics. In return, St. Louis requested a trade and the Lightning ended up honoring the request. On the other side, Glen Sather wrapped up contract extensions with Henrik Lundqvist and Dan Girardi but struggled to find common ground with Callahan. Even though the Lightning had very little leverage in the negotiations, Yzerman still found a way to pry two first-round picks from New York in the process. The Rangers went on to lose in the 2014 Cup Final and fell in the 2015 Conference Finals to the Lightning in a seven-game series. Neither team won a championship because of this move, but both clubs settled a problem with this transaction.

Mike Richards and Jeff Carter end up in Los Angeles, Flyers acquire Wayne Simmonds, Bradyen Schenn and Jakub Voracek

A few maneuvers were significant when Los Angeles won two Stanley Cups early in the decade, but the Kings paid a steep price to acquire Mike Richards in June 2011. Coincidentally, another big piece, Jeff Carter, was traded that day to the Columbus Blue Jackets. He was eventually sent to Los Angeles at the 2012 trade deadline where he became a key cog for the Kings. Anze Kopitar, Drew Doughty and Dustin Brown were already in place, but the acquisition of Richards and Carter were a huge reason why Los Angeles was very successful in the first half of the decade.

On the flip side, the Flyers were looking to change the culture around the club that offseason and landed Wayne Simmonds and Brayden Schenn in the Richards deal, while acquiring Jakub Voracek in the Carter trade. Philadelphia did not win a Stanley Cup, but they were not ripped off in either deal when trading legitimate NHL stars.

Flames send Dougie Hamilton to the Hurricanes in five-player trade

It was a blockbuster trade in June of 2018 that helped both the Carolina Hurricanes and Calgary Flames. Dougie Hamilton, Micheal Ferland and Adam Fox were sent to Carolina in exchange for Noah Hanifin and Elias Lindholm. If one was to define a hockey trade, this would be a great place to start.

One sided trades

Bruins ship Tyler Seguin to Dallas

There are always overreactions after losing in the Stanley Cup Playoffs but the way the Boston Bruins reacted to losing the 2013 Stanley Cup Final was clearly a mistake. The Bruins front office decided to trade Tyler Seguin, a star in the making, to the Dallas Stars for Loui Eriksson and several other pieces. The Bruins did not make matters worse by handing Eriksson a lucrative contract extension in the summer of 2016, but they did lose a player that averaged 77 points per season since the trade.

Capitals send Filip Forsberg to Nashville for Martin Erat

George McPhee is most likely still having nightmares about this transaction.

Ben Bishop for Cory Conacher

This deal is easy to judge knowing how each player performed since the trade. However, in April of 2013 the move did make some sense for both teams. The Ottawa Senators had a crowded crease with Craig Anderson, Robin Lehner and Bishop while Conacher was off to a strong start with the Tampa Bay Lightning, recording 24 points (nine goals, 15 assists) in the first 35 games of the season. The undersized forward instantly became the Senators’ leading scorer upon his arrival but would never become the lethal scorer Ottawa hoped for. On the other hand, Bishop has become a well-rounded NHL goaltender.

Griffin Reinhart to Edmonton

There probably could be a category for several of the moves Peter Chiarelli made but trading two premium draft picks for Griffin Reinhart is at the top of the list. It doesn’t help when one of those picks turned into Mathew Barzal, but the Oilers general manager hoped Reinhart would solve Edmonton’s defensive issues. Former Islanders general manager Garth Snow is probably still confused how he pulled this one off.

Taylor Hall for Adam Larsson

Hall helped the New Jersey Devils return to the Stanley Cup Playoffs and captured the 2018 Hart trophy, while Edmonton picked up a middle-pairing defenseman.

Mika Zibanejad for Derick Brassard

Why the Ottawa Senators were interested in trading a young center with Zibanejad’s potential is still a bit mind-boggling. The Swedish forward has turned into one of the more underrated centers in the NHL while Brassard has bounced around the NHL the past couple of seasons.

Brent Burns to the Sharks

The Minnesota Wild received Devin Setoguchi, Charlie Coyle and a first-round draft pick, but Burns has been one of the most dynamic defensemen in the entire NHL throughout the decade. There are very few assets that could have lived up to the value Burns has provided on the ice.

Franchise Altering Maneuvers

P.K. Subban for Shea Weber

For those who understand the salary cap recapture penalties, the Nashville Predators took a significant gamble when sending Shea Weber to the Montreal Canadiens for P.K. Subban. If Weber were to retire before his deal runs out, they will be forced to operate with a lot of dead money on their books.

Subban did help the Predators reach the Stanley Cup Final in 2017 but has since been shipped off to the New Jersey Devils.

Blues acquire Ryan O'Reilly

The 2019 Conn Smythe winner was an integral member of the St. Louis Blues’ Stanley Cup run last season. Doug Armstrong gave up a lot at the time including a top prospect, two premium picks and two roster players, but the Buffalo Sabres miscalculated in their evaluation. Without the the O’Reilly acquisition, the song ‘Gloria’ is probably not a huge hit in the St. Louis area.

Penguins acquire Phil Kessel

It wasn’t always a smooth ride in Pittsburgh, but Kessel averaged 75 points per season and played a major part in back-to-back Stanley Cup Championships.

TJ Oshie to the Capitals

The Washington Capitals have been one of the most successful teams over the last decade but didn’t get over the hump until the spring of 2018. T.J. Oshie was not the main piece during the championship run, but he has provided secondary scoring and strong two-way play since his acquisition in the summer of 2015.

MORE PHT DECADE IN REVIEW FUN:
• Top NHL players in fantasy hockey
• Most significant goals
• Best players of the decade
• Favorite goals, best/worst jerseys
Best NHL teams of the decade

Scott Charles is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @ScottMCharles.

PHT Morning Skate: Comfortable Pacioretty; Fitzgerald joins Devils’ bench

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Jordan Binnington is going old school with his new mask, which is a tribute to Curtis Joseph. [Blues]

Max Pacioretty is feeling more comfortable in his second season with the Golden Knights and it’s showing on the ice. [NHL.com]

• The Devils have put assistant GM Tom Fitzgerald in an assistant coach role on John Hynes’ staff on a temporary basis. [Devils]

David Pastrnak’s four-goal game is another reminder of how he’s one of the NHL’s biggest bargains. [NBC Sports Boston]

• Dallas Eakins is hoping the Ducks’ power play issues won’t spiral out of control. [OC Register]

• How Zack Kassian persevered through personal issues to thrive with the Oilers. [TSN]

• There’s little hope for the Wild to turn around an ugly start. [Yahoo]

• Why it might be time for the Canadiens to cut back on Shea Weber’s special teams ice time. [Eyes on the Prize]

• Why the Coyotes will be this season’s breakout team. [RotoWorld]

• The Blackhawks third line is doing very well against top competition. [NBC Sports Chicago]

Ryan Callahan on post-retirement life and working at the NHL Network. [Sporting News]

• An in-depth look at the Jets’ beautiful Heritage Classic jerseys. [Hockey by Design]

• Chinese billionaire partners with L.A. Kings to bring hockey to China’s youth. [NBC News]

• A fun look at Jaromir Jagr’s time in New York and the impact he made with the Rangers. [The Hockey News]

• Finally, here’s Jagr showing off the guns:

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LAS VEGAS – natáčení klipu #jagr#fun#lasvegas

A post shared by Jaromír Jágr (@jj68jaromirjagr) on

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Callahan’s move to TV may be model for other injured players

Ryan Callahan figured he would visit a specialist and learn how to fix the back issues that plagued him last season.

Instead, two doctor visits brought the diagnosis of degenerative disk disease and the end of his playing career. Once Callahan came to grips with that, he decided he would like to go into management or broadcasting.

There was one problem: Callahan had one year left on his contract and can’t work for a team until it expires next summer. So the 34-year-old signed on to be an NHL Network analyst this season, possibly creating a road map for other players to follow if injuries cut short their on-ice careers.

”Just to stay busy and stay in the game is the biggest thing,” Callahan said. ”To go from 100 to 0 just like that, it would be tough to do mentally. So, for Ottawa to give me permission to do this, I’m thankful for that and thankful for the NHL for wanting me to do it, as well.”

Callahan played a combined 878 regular-season and playoff games with the New York Rangers and Tampa Bay Lightning but had his contract traded to the Ottawa Senators for salary-cap reasons. It’s similar to situations with injured players Chris Pronger, David Clarkson, Marc Savard, Mikhail Grabovski, Ryane Clowe and Dave Bolland, whose contracts were moved around the league after they hung up their skates for good.

When he steps on set for the first time on Oct. 16, Callahan figures to have a harder time compartmentalizing what’s going on with the Lightning than his new ”teammates” in Ottawa.

”I don’t know anybody in (the Senators) organization; I’ve never played for that team,” Callahan said. ”I think what’ll be more weird is analyzing Tampa Bay’s games just because I know that organization so well and I’m good friends with a lot of the players on the team still.”

Callahan chose to stay in hockey without ruffling any feathers. It hasn’t always been so simple for players whose careers are cut short by injury but move on quickly to other jobs.

The NHL took some criticism for hiring Pronger in the department of player safety in 2014 with three years remaining on his contract, and the menacing defenseman was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame before it was over. Pronger joined the hockey operations staff for the Florida Panthers once he was no longer under contract.

Savard moved into coaching this year as an assistant with the defending Stanley Cup champion St. Louis Blues. Clowe spent two seasons as a New Jersey Devils assistant and had a short stint as an ECHL coach, and Clarkson is coaching a high school team.

Coaching is not in Callahan’s plans, which made broadcasting the logical step.

”I didn’t like that side of the game,” he said. ”It was more behind the scenes things that I wanted to learn more of. Obviously I’ve never done it before. I don’t know if I would enjoy it or not enjoy it, but it’s something that I wanted to learn more of. Being under contract with Ottawa still on long-term (injured reserve), that didn’t give me an opportunity to do that with a team because I’m under contract with Ottawa, so the timing of NHL Network was perfect.”

Lightning offload Callahan’s cap hit to Senators

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The Tampa Bay Lightning have ensured they will have the money to spare on Brayden Point‘s next contract.

Lightning general manager Julien BriseBois offloaded forward Ryan Callahan‘s contract on Tuesday, shedding $5.8 million in cap space along with it in a deal with the Ottawa Senators.

In exchange for taking on the final year of Callahan’s deal, Ottawa gets a fifth-round pick in the 2020 NHL Draft. The Senators, meanwhile, send goalie Mike Condon and a sixth-round pick in 2020 to Tampa.

Callahan will not play for the Senators after a career-ending degenerative back disease was discovered this past season. That means that insurance will pick up 80% of the salary ($3.76 million) and Ottawa will only be responsible for $940,000 of it.

BriseBois was optimistic on Monday, saying a deal with Point will likely get done prior to the opening of training camp.

That seems increasingly accurate now that Callahan is off the books. The Lightning could have placed him on long-term injury reserve themselves, allowing them to go over the cap by his $5.8 million cap hit.

[ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker]

With Condon coming the other way, the Lightning presently have $8.9 million, per Cap Friendly, to sign both Point and fellow restricted free agent Adam Erne.

They also have four goalies on their roster, with Condon, Andrei Vasilevsky, Curtis McElhinney, and Louis Domingue. Condon or Domingue will be a surplus to requirements. Condon carries a $2.4 million cap hit next season while Domingue is at $1.15 million.

If buried, CapFriendly says Condon’s cap hit would drop to $1.325 million.

Either way, the Lightning now have room for both their RFAs without much worry.

MORE: Lightning ‘optimistic’ in Point deal before training camp

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Back injury ends Ryan Callahan’s career; Lightning put him on LTIR

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Sad news from the Tampa Bay Lightning on Thursday: Ryan Callahan‘s NHL career is likely over, and his $5.8 million cap hit will be relegated to LTIR.

The 34-year-old spoke with Bryan Burns of the Lightning website about what appears to be a career-ending back injury, described specifically as “degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine,” which Callahan noted affected his lower-back most of all.

” … Unfortunately there doesn’t even seem to be anything they can do immediately to fix the problem,” Callahan said. “And that’s never easy to hear when you’re speaking to a couple doctors and all of them agree on the same thing.”

Callahan told Burns that it’s unlikely that this would be something he could try a comeback from after trying to heal up for a year or two.

“I don’t think a year off or two years off is going to help it to be honest with you,” Callahan said. “From what the doctors have said and the way I feel, it doesn’t look like I’m going to be able to come back.”

From there, it’s the very sad reality of an athlete who put his body on the line by delivering a ton of hits, blocking a lot of shots, and generally going all-out physically. The goal is for Callahan to maintain a quality of life, and that means daily rehab to manage pain.

About the only bright side seems to be that, at the moment, Callahan doesn’t seem to think he’d need invasive back surgery. Here’s hoping that remains the case, as long as that’s the safest and most comfortable route for Callahan.

Of course, Lightning fans will wonder about the various routes the team will take to handle Callahan’s $5.8M cap hit, now that a buyout isn’t really an option. Cap Friendly notes the savings the Lightning receive from Callahan’s unfortunate circumstances.

That $5.8M will certainly come in handy for the cap-challenged Lightning as they hope to sign rising star and RFA Brayden Point, preferably before he reaches the point where an offer sheet would be a threat (credible or otherwise). The Lightning were almost certain to try to trade Callahan, or at least his cap hit, during this summer, so a small silver lining is that one awkward situation was avoided.

Here’s hoping that Callahan can get to a point where he’s comfortable on a daily basis, and his experiences are another reminder that, for all the talk about hockey players being “warriors,” this rugged sport takes a toll on players, particularly longtime ones such as Callahan.

Callahan scored 386 points (186 goals, 200 assists) in 757 regular-season games between the Lightning and the New York Rangers, a team he captained from 2011-12 to 2013-14, when he was a key part of the Martin St. Louis trade. Callahan was credited with 626 blocked shots and 2,147 hits, according to Hockey Reference, and that ignores 14 games from 2006-07. Callahan brought that same spirit to 121 career playoff games.

And, as a reminder, he was more than just a “heart and soul” player, particularly during his peak with the Rangers. Callahan scored 20+ goals on four different occasions, and reached his career-high of 54 points during two different seasons.

That’s a heck of a career for the 127th pick of the 2004 NHL Draft, but here’s hoping that Callahan achieves the most important victory of feeling better.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.