Rick DiPietro

NHL Power Rankings: Top Draft Lottery memories

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Hockey fans will get something to obsess about on Friday, June 26, as the 2020 NHL Draft Lottery will air on NBCSN at 8 p.m. ET. If one of the NHL’s bottom seven teams wins the first draw, we might know where Alexis Lafrenière is headed (assuming, reasonably safely, that he goes first). As promising as Lafrenière is, history shows that winning a draft lottery isn’t the only part of putting together a championship team — if you even get that far.

I mean … don’t get me wrong, as this list shows, it often helps. A lot.

The latest PHT Power Rankings list breaks down top memories that have come from draft lotteries. Sometimes we’ll see big winners, losers, or both. Sometimes there will be tragic comedy, or incredible luck (*cough* or both).

The experience of seeing your team’s luck swing on the bounces of lottery balls can be agonizing. It also makes just about every experience a personal one. So, if you have draft lottery memories that didn’t make the cut, absolutely share them.

Try not to ruin your day going over such memories, though.

[How the 2020 NHL Draft Lottery will work. It could get complicated.]

1. Penguins land Crosby in strange 2005 NHL Draft Lottery

You know it’s an odd, memorable draft lottery when Sports Illustrated gives it the oral history treatment.

Sidney Crosby also ended up justifying the hype, making the 2005 NHL Draft lottery possibly the most pivotal since the format began.

On one hand, the Penguins received some of the best odds to win. They received three of the 48 lottery balls in the NHL’s strange setup, ranking among four teams with the most. Even so, they had a 6.3 percent chance to win the Crosby sweepstakes. (Somewhere, Brian Burke is still fuming about this.)

You can probably set off a brushfire of hockey debate by asking how much the Penguins’ success hinged on luck — not just landing Crosby, but Evgeni Malkin second in 2004, and a bucket of other high picks — and how much hinged on solid management. There’s no debate that the Penguins came out of the lockout with two enormous additions.

You can also entertain yourself with some Ducks alternate history. What if they did land Crosby? Imagine if Burke’s alleged aims to trade for Joe Thornton worked out? Would Burke still be challenging Kevin Lowe and others to barn brawls as Ducks GM to this day?

*Loosens tie over the whole thing*

Also:

  • The Canadiens only received one lottery ball, yet eventually drafted Carey Price fifth overall.
  • The Sabres had three lottery balls, but chose (*moves imaginary glasses from forehead to eyes*) … Marek Zagrapan? Oof.

That 2005 NHL Draft tops the list of lottery memories. There are plenty of other dramatic swings to mull over, however.

2. Blackhawks lose big in 2004, then win big in 2007

It’s easy to zero in on the top pick of a draft versus the second when you look back at draft lottery swings. But don’t sleep on the third pick, and on, because that’s where the deepest belly laughs and cringes often lurk.

Consider 2004. The Capitals rocketed back to relevance thanks to Alex Ovechkin. Malkin served as the first of the Penguins’ two superstars (but far from the only high picks, as the Penguins marinated in those during a run of profound ineptitude).

The Blackhawks? They chose Cam Barker third overall. Brutal.

Luckily, the Blackhawks ended up trading Barker for a future building block in Nick Leddy. Amusingly, fourth overall pick Andrew Ladd also helped Chicago down the line.

But most luckily, the Blackhawks landed the top pick in 2007 despite having the fifth-best chances (8.1 percent). Chicago selected Patrick Kane, pairing him with Jonathan Toews on their way to three Stanley Cups.

The Flyers suffered through a miserable season, yet instead of drafting Kane, they ended up with James van Riemsdyk. There’s a kinship, oddly, between JVR and Bobby Ryan: two New Jersey natives, who were second overall picks, and enjoyed bumpy-but-productive careers that probably didn’t soothe the wounds of those who were mad about draft lottery results.

Did we mention they were from New Jersey? (Crowd boos.)

[NHL Mock Draft: Lafreniere head of the 2020 prospect class]

3. The Oilers land McDavid, McDavid makes classic McDavid face

Compared to the Sabres’ 20-percent chance, the Oilers were underdogs to land Connor McDavid with the third-best odds (11.5). But the Oilers’ rain and reign of first overall picks continued.

As you may remember, McDavid looked thrilled.

There’s a sound argument for this rankings second, not third, among draft lottery memories. After all, McDavid ranks as the biggest star to emerge first overall since Crosby.

He also made that face.

But the other factor that looms large is the deep failure of the Oilers and the Sabres. Edmonton achieves borderline art in poor development (Nail Yakupov, first in 2012) and poor decisions (trading Taylor Hall, first in 2010) to squander so much good fortune. Only now are the Oilers flirting with the success they were practically gifted, and that hinges a ton on McDavid and Leon Draisaitl.

The Sabres have been a mess for about a decade. They can’t pin that on getting Jack Eichel instead of McDavid, even if they clearly tanked for McDavid.

Hockey fans might want to attribute the success of teams like the Penguins and Blackhawks to premium picks alone. Yet, the Sabres and especially Oilers show us that you can squander such riches.

4. Taylor Hall, lottery ball specialist

Taylor Hall, one-time MVP and himself the top pick of 2010, became a good luck charm for his teams — at least when it came to draft lotteries. The biggest win came when the Oilers won the McDavid sweepstakes in 2015, while the Devils also landed Nico Hischier and most recently Jack Hughes in lotteries with Hall in the fold.

Hall hasn’t just shown a good sense of humor about it. He’s done so multiple times.

In 2015, McDavid:

After 2017, when the Devils eventually added Hischier:

Hall still provided some great barbs in 2019, though he wouldn’t spend much time with Jack Hughes:

So, a question: do we gauge Hall’s continued lottery ball dominance based on where the Coyotes draft, or if he signs with a different team in free agency? This is important, I think.

[PHT Roundtable: Draft Lottery format reactions]

5. Flyers make biggest jump ever

Heading into the 2017 NHL Draft Lottery, the Flyers held the 13th rank. Despite that standing, they jumped all the way to the second pick. Philly had a 2.4 percent chance to do that.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t seem like a Blackhawks Barker-to-Kane flip. Early in his career, Nolan Patrick has been some combination of inconsistent and injured (his career outlook is still foggy because of migraines).

Patrick’s health issues make it seem way too harsh to throw the word “bust” around. But that jump to No. 2 definitely didn’t deliver for the Flyers quite like they dreamed.

The next three picks turn the knife deeper for Flyers fans. The Stars drafted a defensive pillar in Miro Heiskanen. Then the Avalanche got a pillar of their own in Cale Makar. Finally, the Canucks might have drafted the “real” top pick in Elias Pettersson.

Ouch.

Honorable mention NHL Draft Lottery storylines and memories

To reiterate, good draft lottery luck doesn’t always translate to the standings. Sometimes it doesn’t even mean you’ll choose the right player.

  • The Thrashers (Patrik Stefan) and Islanders (Rick DiPietro) followed back-to-back blunders, and made blunders around those moves. Trading Roberto Luongo, giving DiPietro a ruinous contract, and so on showed that winning the lottery isn’t everything. Granted, Atlanta eventually struck gold with Ilya Kovalchuk (2001) — at least for a while.
  • Buffalo suffered some bad luck, but they need more than lottery wins. Rasmus Dahlin (2018) looks legit, yet he hasn’t been able to solve the Sabres’ problems. That takes multiple shrewd moves … and, yes, some luck.
  • You could rank the Canucks among the teams that have been burned by bad draws. Even so, some of their best recent picks came outside the true no-brainer range. They selected Elias Pettersson fifth in 2017, and he’d probably be the top pick in a re-draft. The Quinn Hughes pick (seventh in 2018) looked smart then, and brilliant now.

MORE POWER RANKINGS:

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Rick DiPietro has a new career on sports talk radio

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You probably haven’t forgotten about Rick DiPietro.

The former New York Islanders goalie was the butt of jokes for a long time due to his 15-year contract and inability to stay healthy, but he’s got a new line of work as Neil Best of Newsday shares. He’s taken his talents to sports talk radio.

“I love it,” DiPietro said. “I’ll do it until they tell me to stop. I would always joke with my wife: ‘Can you imagine if I got a job where I get to talk about sports for a living?’ She was like, ‘I can’t even imagine. You’d love that.’

“This is like a dream come true.”

On top of all that, DiPietro is also now on Twitter (@HDumpty39) and his particular brand of self-deprecating humor shows through in all that he’s doing. He’s even turning into a fan-favorite for all kinds of sports fans with his new career.

While his playing career didn’t turn out the way he or anyone else thought it would, the first overall pick in 2000 at least won’t have to worry about a freak injury behind the mic. Sore throats are a bit easier to treat than wonky knees.

Islanders may have a big question mark in Nabokov

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The New York Islanders last season saw Evgeni Nabokov provide stability to a position that saw endless questions surrounding it last season. After years of watching Rick DiPietro try to lock things down in goal only to see injury throw a wrench into the plans, Nabokov’s steady play led the Islanders back to the playoffs for the first time since 2006-07.

This offseason saw GM Garth Snow opt to bring back Nabokov rather than sniff around at other available netminders because “the team wanted him back.” At 38 years old, his best years are likely behind him. With the Islanders on the rise, is it possible the guy who kept them steady last season will be the one holding them back now? Perhaps.

Nabokov’s two seasons with the Isles have seen him be an average to slightly below-average goalie. Check the numbers:

2011-12:  19-18-3  .914 SV%  2.55 GAA

2012-13:  23-11-7  .910 SV%  2.50 GAA

The goals-against average is OK and while the save percentage might look scary, some of his winningest seasons with the Sharks saw him put up the exact same numbers.

Of course, the Sharks also had issues flaming out in the playoffs earlier than they should have so maybe that’s not the greatest thing to bring up.

As he showed against the Penguins in the playoffs, Nabokov had problems keeping up after the regular season. He stopped shots at a .842 rate (a career postseason low) and if it weren’t for Marc-Andre Fleury’s struggles, Nabokov’s play would’ve come under more fire.

With performances like this, you have to wonder if a team like the Islanders, who have a superstar in John Tavares, a great goal-scorer in Matt Moulson, budding defensive talent in Travis Hamonic and other great youth either already on the scene or on the way, will see their seasons put in peril by Nabokov’s play.

The team seems to support him and pick him up when he struggles, but at some point that kind of magic goes away. At age 38 and after such disappointing play in the postseason, Garth Snow and gang have to be prepared in case he hit the wall already.

Islanders to buy out Rick DiPietro

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Rick DiPietro is about to become an ex-Islander.

Arthur Staple of New York Newsday reports the Islanders will place the much-maligned goaltender on $100 waivers tomorrow for the express purpose of using a compliance buyout on him.

GM Garth Snow’s decision to buy out DiPietro will cost the Islanders $1.5 million per year for the next 16 years as he had eight years remaining on his deal, good for a total of $24 million. Seven years ago, DiPietro signed a 15-year, $67.5 million deal with the team, a deal that’s been panned ever since mostly due to DiPietro’s inability to stay healthy.

The Islanders were already in the market for a goaltender this summer and DiPietro never factored into their plans. Last season, he was sent to the AHL after passing through waivers unclaimed. There he found himself embroiled in some controversy after making comments to a local reporter who mistook his sarcasm for truth when he said the treatment by fans made him contemplate suicide.

DiPietro’s 15-year deal has only been matched in length by Ilya Kovalchuk’s deal with the New Jersey Devils. Now he sees his future in doubt and an ugly chapter to his career come to a close. It makes quite the fall from grace for the No. 1 overall pick in the 2000 NHL Draft.

Islanders’ DiPietro pulled in appearance with AHL’s Sound Tigers

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Things seem to be going from bad to worse for Rick DiPietro.

On Friday, DiPietro, making his first appearance for the Bridgeport Sound Tigers, allowed five goals on just 12 shots in the first period and was on the bench to start the second period.

Bridgeport lost the game 7-3 to the Connecticut Whale.

The past few weeks have seen DiPietro waved by the New York Islanders and eventually sent to Bridgeport of the American Hockey League. He also commented about contemplating suicide, although he later tried to clarify that his comments were facetious.

The Islanders released a statement earlier this week about the severity of DiPietro’s suicide remarks.

DiPietro still has eight years left on a 15-year contract worth $67.5 million with the New York Islanders. His NHL career has been severely stalled due to injuries and inconsistent play.