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Former Canadiens defenseman Andrei Markov retires from hockey

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He last played in the NHL in the 2016-17 season, but 41-year-old defenseman Andrei Markov has retired from the sport of hockey, according to his agent.

“Hockey is over for him now,” agent Sergey Isakov told La Presse (translated via NHL.com). “He wants to spend time with his family.”

Markov was drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in the sixth round of the 1998 NHL draft. After 16 seasons with the Original Six franchise, he continued his career for the the past three years in the KHL and played for Yaroslavl Lokomotiv this past season.

Markov retired with 119 goals, 453 assists in 990 NHL games and participated in 89 Stanley Cup Playoff games. He also played in two NHL All-Star games.

“It was his dream to finish his career in Montreal,” Isakov said. “He really wanted to, but there’s nothing he can do about it. The general manager [Marc Bergevin] only wanted to offer a one-year contract (in 2017), while Andrei was looking for a two-year deal. After that, Andrei and I discussed the possibility of a return to Montreal, but it didn’t materialize. It’s too bad, because he really wanted to play 1,000 games for the Canadiens.”

 


Scott Charles is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @ScottMCharles.

Report: Ryane Clowe’s NHL career is over

AP
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For all intents and purposes, it sounds like Ryane Clowe‘s NHL playing days are finished.

That’s the report from the Bergen Record’s Tom Gulitti, who passes along word from New Jersey Devils GM Ray Shero that Clowe “will be unable to play hockey now or in the future.”

Clowe, 32, admits that he’d rather continuing playing for the Devils, yet doctors recommend that he hang up his skates.

Shero told Gulitti that Clowe will go on IR or long-term injured reserve for the remaining three years of his contract, depending upon how his $4.85 million cap hit affects the Devils’ situation.

Clowe’s hard-hitting style helped him earn the five-year, $24.25 million contract the Devils handed him heading into 2013-14, but it ultimately caught up to him.

Concussion issues plagued him almost since day one with the Devils, doing little to silence critics of that deal.

While it’s clear Clowe wanted to try to play, it’s tough to imagine him being a difference-maker without taking physical risks. It’s a shame that Clowe isn’t the one making the call, but it might be the right move.

Rich Peverley retires from NHL, joins Stars’ front office

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Rich Peverley shared some sad (though maybe not surprising) news on Saturday: his NHL playing career is over.

On the bright side, it sounds as though he’s immediately transitioning to a front office job, as he told the Dallas Morning News’ Mike Heika that he’ll work in the player development department.

“It was working out, monitoring how I was doing, continuing to see doctors to exhaust every avenue and find out exactly if I could play,” Peverley said to the DMN. “It’s a case that’s very complicated, and what I have learned is there is no 100 percent to medicine and, unfortunately, I can’t play anymore.”

Peverley fought his way from going undrafted to playing 442 regular season games and 59 postseason contests in his career. He’s likely best remembered for his time with Boston, where he won a Stanley Cup in 2011.

It’s never a happy moment to see a player hang up his skates at what he believes is a premature age (Peverley is 33).

On the other hand, there are probably a few onlookers who are breathing a sigh of relief.

Peverley’s “cardiac incident” was a truly frightening scene, and many were worried about the risks he might be taking if he resumed NHL play. Some of the choice might have been taken out of his hands, as it’s plausible that no GM wanted to roll the dice with his health.

Heika shares more details regarding Peverley’s decision and his role with the Stars organization here.

Tyler Seguin already spoke out about his former teammate:

Pondering retirement indeed: Carcillo is ’98 percent ready to move on’

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Daniel Carcillo isn’t just considering retirement; it sounds like he’s strongly leaning in that direction.

During an appearance on CSN Chicago’s Kap & Haugh, Carcillo said he’s “about 98 percent ready to move on.”

“Thirty is a good age for me to get out and do some other things,” Carcillo said.

As noted in this post, Carcillo detailed his plan to help players post-retirement with “Chapter 5” in an interview with The Chicago Tribune.

He’s raising money for his not-for-profit organization, and it sounds like that is going well:

Carcillo has enjoyed some big wins at the NHL level with the Chicago Blackhawks and Los Angeles Kings, even if an increasingly reduced role meant zero playoff appearances in the Blackhawks’ 2015 postseason run (he did play in 39 regular season games, however).

Combine that declining role with Carcillo’s clear realization that the sport takes a huge toll on a person, and it’s understandable that he’s weighing his options. Perhaps he can do some good after those years of being an agitating presence on the ice?

Check out his emotional video for The Players’ Tribune, where he speaks from the heart about Steve Montador’s untimely death.

Report: Milan Hejduk to announce retirement

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Milan Hejduk didn’t sign with anyone to play this season, and now it appears there’s a good reason for that.

According to a report from iSport (link in Czech) in the Czech Republic, Hejduk says he’s decided to retire from hockey and a formal announcement is coming soon.

Hejduk played 14 seasons in the NHL, all with the Colorado Avalanche. He was a key member of their 2001 Stanley Cup-winning team and was the Rocket Richard winner in 2002-03 when he led the league with 50 goals. He also was part of the gold medal-winning Czech Republic team in 1998.

Through his NHL career, Hejduk had 375 goals and 805 points in 1,020 career games. In the postseason he was a major player as well piling up 76 points in 112 career playoff games.

Those may not be Hall of Fame-like numbers, but he’ll be remembered as being one of the Avalanche’s most consistent scorers spanning two eras with that franchise. He started his time there playing alongside Joe Sakic and closed it out with the likes of Matt Duchene, Paul Stastny, and Gabriel Landeskog. That’ll do.