Paul Kariya

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Roundtable: What is your favorite hockey call of all-time?

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What is your favorite radio or TV call from a moment in hockey history?

Sean Leahy, NHL writer: The Devils may have won the 2003 Stanley Cup, but my lasting memory will be from Game 6 as the Ducks looked to force a Game 7.

At 6:26 of the second period, Kariya took a big hit from Scott Stevens and remains motionless on the ice for several minutes. He was helped to the dressing room but returned later in the period as the Ducks held a 3-1 lead. As New Jersey took the puck up ice, a turnover saw Anaheim head the other way, with Kariya receiving a pass in the neutral in full stride. As he crossed the blue line into the Devils’ zone he wound up and ripped a bullet past Martin Brodeur.

It was a huge moment for the Ducks. It gave them a three-goal lead in a game they needed to win. It also provided a huge emotional boost to not only the team, but also the Arrowhead Pond. ESPN’s Gary Thorne then summed up Kariya”s heroics with the great “Off the floor, On the board! Paul Kariya!” call.

James O’Brien, NHL writer: Here I was, getting ready to sheepishly cop to my Gary Thorne love. Well, Sean shows that we should all embrace our Thorne love like Thorne announced: with reckless abandon, and little fear of going over the top.

With Thorne off the board, I can’t help but go with something so obvious … yet something that also happened (redacted for self-esteem) numbers of years before I was born. That’s right, I’m going with Al Michaels “Do you believe in Miracles? YES!” call after the Miracle on Ice 1980 U.S. Olympic men’s hockey team pulled off said miracle (on ice, in Lake [Placid]).

You know it’s a great call when it a) served as the title of a syrupy Disney movie on the subject decades later and b) prompted Michaels to discuss the call, and the moment, more decades later. It’s a testament to Michaels that he can keep talking about it over and over again, without it being boring.

Then again, can a miracle be boring?

(Tries to walk on water, nearly drowns, concludes that even attempting a miracle is pretty eventful.)

Jake Abrahams, Managing Editor, NHL content: If there’s nothing like playoff hockey, then there is truly nothing like playoff overtime hockey. And in the spring of 1993, hockey fans were spoiled with what remains a record 28 playoff overtime games.

In this wild and crazy postseason, legendary Sabres broadcaster Rick Jeanneret delivered perhaps his most famous call when 21-year-old Brad May potted the series-clinching goal against Andy Moog and the Bruins:

This had every component of an epic call. The intensity of overtime in a potential series-clinching game. A steady buildup to the play as May deked the last Bruins defender in his path, Ray Bourque. An obvious scoring opportunity that let Jeanerret begin to lean into the moment. A pretty finish by May to complete the series sweep on home ice. And most importantly, the heavy doses of flair and pizzazz that make Jeanneret such a treasure.

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Hockey Hall of Fame class of 2017 grew the game in many ways

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The Hockey Hall of Fame will induct its 2017 class Monday night in Toronto. The seven individuals who will be enshrined include five players and two builders.

Clare Drake, Jeremy Jacobs, Dave Andreychuk, Danielle Goyette, Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi and Teemu Selanne will join the many other legends inside the old bank building on Yonge Street forever. Their contributions as a whole, no matter their position in hockey, helped grow the game to what it’s known as today.

Builder

Clare Drake — The most successful coach in Canadian university hockey history won six national championships in 28 years at the University of Alberta. He retired in 1989 with a record of 697-296-37, which comes out to a .695 winning percentage. Drake not only contributed at the university level, he also spent time at the professional level with a year coaching the Edmonton Oilers in the WHA in 1975-76, working as a Winnipeg Jets assistant in 1989-90 and helping out the Dallas Stars during the 2001 Stanley Cup Playoffs. He was also behind the bench for Canada’s entry at the 1980 Olympic Games in Lake Placid, N.Y. Drake’s last legacy may be his role in developing players and educating coaches through his contributions to the Canadian Coaching Certification Program.

Jeremy Jacobs — Since purchasing the Boston Bruins since 1975, the franchise has made the Stanley Cup Final six times, winning once. He’s been Chairman of the NHL Board of Governors for the last 10 years was the recipient of the Lester Patrick Trophy in 2015 for his “outstanding service to hockey in the United States.”

Player

Dave Andreychuk — Only 13 players in NHL history have scored more goals than Andreychuk, who put up 640 in 1,639 NHL games. Of those 640 goals, 274 came on the power play, the most in NHL history. A two-time All-Star and 2004 Stanley Cup champion with the Tampa Bay Lightning, ‘Andy’ hit the 50-goal mark twice in his career. It also hard to imagine many of his goals that weren’t scored from around the blue paint.

Danielle Goyette — A two-time Olympic goal medalist and eight-time winner at the World Championship as part of Team Canada, Goyette hung up her skates with 113 goals and 105 assists in 171 games representing her country. During the 1998 Olympics, she led all players with eight goals. Four years later, in helping Canada win gold, she tied for the scoring lead with 10 points. In 2006, as she helped her country to a second straight gold, she was selected as flag bearer during the Opening Ceremonies. Currently, Goyette is the second-leading scorer in women’s Olympic history with 15 goals.

Paul Kariya — Kariya’s hockey accomplishments didn’t just come while part of the NHL. Before he was drafted fourth overall by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, he won the World Junior Championship with Canada and later the NCAA title with Maine in 1993. A year later he would win gold at the World Championship and in 2002 was part of the Olympic winning Canadian side at the Salt Lake Games. Eleven games shy of 1,000 games for his career, he finished with 402 goals and 989 points — on the dot to be a point per game player over his career. A two-time Lady Byng winner and seven-time All-Star, Kariya is well-remembered for his goal during the 2003 Stanley Cup Final, which came 10 minutes after a vicious hit from Scott Stevens of the New Jersey Devils:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5QEVPWfxcY%5D

Mark Recchi —One of four players in NHL history to play more than 1,700 games, Recchi enters the Hall as a five-time Stanley Cup champion, three of which came during his playing career. He’s one of 10 players in history to win a title on three different NHL teams, and his career ended with 577 goals and 1,533 points. Outside of a 15-game first NHL year, he scored double digit goals in 21 straight seasons.

Teemu Selanne —Selanne introduced himself to the NHL world in spectacular fashion with a 76-goal, Calder Trophy winning rookie season in 1992-93. The goals continued over the next 22 years as the “Finnish Flash” scored 684 of them, good for 11th all-time. He’s also the all-time leading scorer in Olympic history with 43 points in 37 games. His trophy case is filled with one Stanley Cup, a Masterton Trophy, Rocket Richard Trophy, four bronze and one silver Olympic medals, and silver and bronze from the World Championship, among many other honors. We all, of course, remember the goal and celebration that helped him break the rookie goal scoring record in 1993:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vtk6yVqDy3Q%5D

Also being honored in Toronto are Cam Cole, winner of the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award “in recognition of distinguished members of the newspaper profession whose words have brought honor to journalism and to hockey” as selected by the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association, and late NHL play-by-play man Dave Strader, who is this year’s Foster Hewitt Memorial Award honoree for his outstanding contributions as a hockey broadcaster.

What are you favorite memories from this year’s inductees?

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Video: Getzlaf, Ducks top Stars

Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry each had a goal and an assist as the Anaheim Ducks defeated the Dallas Stars 3-1 on Sunday night.

Anahiem has now won five of its last seven while the Stars are winless in six.

Cayton Stoner had the other Ducks goal. John Gibson made 39 saves for the win.

Patrick Eaves had the lone Stars goal.

Jhonas Enroth stopped 19 shots in the loss.

With his two point night, Getzlaf (669) moved into a tie with Paul Kariya for second place on the franchise’s all-time points list.

The Ducks lost TIm Jackman early in the first period to a lower body injury. Bruce Boudreau said the forward is “day-to-day”.

Anaheim has held Dallas to just one goal in each of the first two meetings between the two clubs. The pair meet for a third and final time on April 8 at the Honda Center.

Alex Steen’s concussion recovery troubles continue

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Blues forward Alex Steen has had his struggles this year recovering from a concussion. He’s missed 26 straight games and the Blues miss his offensive punch in the lineup.

Unfortunately for Steen, his recovery isn’t seeing any stark improvements and he’s champing at the bit to find a way to get healthy. As Jeremy Rutherford of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports, Steen will be heading to California to get the same kind of treatment Paul Kariya had for his concussion problems.

“I’m trying to get myself back on track here,” Steen said. “It’s hard to explain what I’m going through. I … don’t want to get into too many details about it, but it’s been on and off. I’ve tried everything in my power to get back on the ice.

“So, I’ll be heading (to California) and (be) leaving the team and leaving St. Louis for a couple of weeks.”

This doesn’t sound very promising for Steen with how he’s doing. Going away for two weeks to see if he can get things figured out is a good step. As for banking on Steen coming back to the help the Blues in the playoffs, that would be a risky proposition.

We know that concussions are tough to figure out and considering he’s going to the same place Kariya was treated, that sounds foreboding. Here’s to hoping it works out better for Steen than it did for Kariya.

Andy McDonald becomes the NHL’s latest concussion victim

St. Louis Blues GM Doug Armstrong announced today that Andy McDonald has been placed on injured reserve due to a concussion suffered during the Blues’ Oct. 13 game versus Dallas. McDonald’s head hit the glass after getting checked into the boards by the Stars’ Vern Fiddler at the end of the second period, but he did come back in the third for what would be his final shift of the evening.

This is McDonald’s second concussion in less than a year.

With the injury, McDonald joins a laundry list of NHLers currently out with a concussion or related symptoms — the others Marc Savard, Raitis Ivanans, Ben Smith, Ben Eager, Francis Bouillon, Rick DiPietro, Marc Staal, Ian Laperriere, Kurt Sauer, Nick Petersen, Tyler Kennedy, fellow Blues teammate David Perron and the most high-profile of them all, Sidney Crosby.

(NB: Should be mentioned on TSN’s injury report, these are the only ones listed under “concussion”. Several others — including Adam McQuaid, Jochen Hecht, Mark Olver, Peter Mueller, Michal Rozsival and Jay Beagle — are filed under the always-curious “head” category.)

It’s also another concussion for St. Louis, a team that’s seen a lot of them recently. Concussions forced Paul Kariya to retire this past summer and took all but 10 games away from Perron last season (who is now skating and hoping to join the Blues soon). Defenseman Carlo Colaiacovo is also out with what’s being classified as an “upper body injury” but his symptoms suggest he’s suffering post-concussion issues as well.