officiating controversy

2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs’ most controversial calls

8 Comments

The Boston Bruins and their fans were upset about officials not calling a penalty on Tyler Bozak before the Blues’ eventual game-winner in Game 5 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final, but if misery loves company, than they shouldn’t feel alone.

In fact, the Bruins’ opponents in St. Louis had already been on both sides of some of the most pivotal, polarizing calls of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs before Game 5.

Let’s run down some of the biggest controversies of this postseason, starting with Thursday’s non-call. As a note: not every call was necessarily wrong, and this isn’t a comprehensive list, so feel free to air officiating grievances (or grievances about officiating grievances) in the comments.

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Missed trip

Should it be considered a trip, a slew-foot, or no penalty at all? Well, as you can see in the video above this post’s headline, it sure seemed like Tyler Bozak thought he was going to the penalty box – just ask Bruins head coach Bruce Cassidy – for taking down Noel Acciari.

At that point, the Blues were up 1-0, but moments after that non-call, Ryan O'Reilly found David Perron for what would eventually stand as the game-winning goal.

If the call was made, it would have still been 1-0 rather than 2-0 for the Blues, and the Bruins would have headed to the power play. It’s also worth noting that a) the Bruins seemed discombobulated by that turn of events and b) Acciari was taken out of the play, effectively making it a 5-on-4 situation, so that turn of events also heightened the Blues’ chances of scoring that goal.

The hand pass

It doesn’t get much more pivotal than a blown call in overtime, at least if that call leads to a deciding goal.

Consider this maybe the high point of the trilogy of moments that went the Sharks’ way during their playoff run, as Timo Meier got away with a hand pass before Erik Karlsson scored the OT game-winner in Game 3 of the 2019 Western Conference Final against the Blues.

The Blues took the high road following that controversy, and eventually won their series against the Sharks, while top officials noted that the play was not reviewable. Could that be one of those moments that changes the goal review process in 2019-20? We shall see.

Blues score with Bishop down

File this one under the tougher judgment calls.

It all happened pretty quickly, as Ben Bishop went down after a hard shot to the collarbone area from Colton Parayko. Moments later – but arguably with more than enough time for officials to blow the play dead if they chose to – Jaden Schwartz scored a big goal that helped St. Louis force a Game 7 against the Dallas Stars in what would turn out to be an extremely close Round 2 series.

The Gabriel Landeskog incident

It seemed like the Colorado Avalanche tied Game 7 of their Round 2 series against the Sharks, until they didn’t.

Instead, the Sharks reversed Colin Wilson‘s would-be tying goal thanks to an offside review. To Landeskog’s credit, the Avalanche captain took the blame, rather than throwing officials under the bus.

Should that play have been offside? Was there even some room to look at it as too many men on the ice? It was a strange situation, either way, and another moment that worked out for San Jose, as the Sharks ultimately eliminated Colorado.

Major problem

The Golden Knights were up 3-0 against the Sharks in Game 7 of Round 1, and then Cody Eakin was whistled for a major penalty after his check (and a bump from Paul Stastny) led to a terrifying, bloody fall for Joe Pavelski.

The Sharks stunningly scored four goals during that five-minute major, and while Vegas showed scrappiness in sending that Game 7 to overtime, San Jose eventually prevailed. It’s true that the Golden Knights’ penalty kill was preposterously porous during that four-goal barrage, but Vegas was fuming after the loss, with Jonathan Marchessault comparing the perceived officiating mistake to the infamous blown pass interference call that went against the New Orleans Saints.

Most would agree that Eakin deserved to be penalized, while the debate revolves around it being a major and game misconduct. The human element of the situation cannot be ignored, as officials saw a scary scene where Pavelski was bleeding, and it happened in front of a San Jose crowd.

This is another play that might have a ripple effect. Will the NHL decide to make major penalties (or discussions of major penalties) subject to video review?

***

It’s crucial to mention that it must be difficult to officiate any sport, let alone one as fast-paced as hockey. For every call you miss or make, there’s someone behind the scenes complaining about too many or too few calls. After all, Bruce Cassidy believes that Craig Berube’s complaints about officials changed the “narrative” of the Stanley Cup Final.

Getting these calls correct, all the time, is a prime example of “Easier said than done.”

Still, for fans and teams who feel slighted, these moments will reverberate, at least if their runs don’t end with a Stanley Cup victory.

Are there any moments that stand out to you, beyond the five splashy ones above? If you want to dig up old gripes about Wayne Gretzky high-sticking Doug Gilmour, have at it. Replaying those major, split-second decisions is half the fun/agony of being a hockey fan, right?

Game 6 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final airs at 8 p.m. ET on Sunday (NBC; stream here).

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Danny Briere was offside on 3-1 goal

54 Comments

Danny Briere isn’t the biggest player by any means, so the Philadelphia Flyers forward has become the leading playoff scorer of the post-lockout era because of his cleverness and craftiness. Apparently he’s good at sneaking by officials’ eyes every now and then, as the NBC Sports Network gang captured evidence that Briere was offside while receiving the pass that set up Philly’s only goal so far in a 3-1 game that eventually morphed into a 4-3 overtime shocker.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

It certainly wouldn’t be fair to pin a potential comeback on that blown call alone – some will quibble with an icing that wasn’t called, eventually allowing Pascal Dupuis’ 3-0 goal to happen – but it absolutely helped to open up the door for a Flyers resurgence.

Conspiracy theorists tend to pile up against the Penguins, but any tin foil hat wearers in Pittsburgh might break them out if this game gets interesting as the third period approaches.

Is officiating a cause for concern for Tampa Bay in Game 6? Guy Boucher is aware it might

7 Comments

Officiating is a big part of any game in the NHL playoffs. Last night we saw a missed deflection turn into an icing call that allowed the Vancouver Canucks to tie the game with under 20 seconds to play and force overtime where they’d go on to win the game and series over San Jose. Tampa Bay has seen Steve Downie get the rough treatment from referee Tim Peel in Game 4 that saw him receive a ten minute misconduct as well as a diving penalty late in the game when he was boarded by Nathan Horton.

With Game 6 upon us and the Lightning needing a win to stay alive, there’s a curious referee assignment in tonight’s game. Officials Kelly Sutherland and Eric Furlatt have drawn tonight’s assignment with Dan O’Rourke the backup in case of injury. What you may not know is that Furlatt has a bit of a history with the Lightning this season in that he’s called 24 penalties against Tampa Bay and just nine against their opponents.

Lightning coach Guy Boucher is more than aware of who will be out on the ice tonight as he was asked about it during today’s press conference.

Q. Guy, do you get concerned at all sometimes when you see the officials who are on the sheet? You get one particular tonight who’s been very lopsided the past few times.

COACH BOUCHER: 24-9 against, right? Yes, I’m aware of it. Very aware of it. Very, very aware of it. It has been a part of our discussions quite a few times in the last game, the last games we did have that particular ref. And it is lopsided.
But the only thing we can control is what we do on the ice and hope that things will be fair like it is with everybody else.

Q. Do you block that out of your mind, though? Do you have to ignore it, who it is, and just go about your business?

COACH BOUCHER: You want to ignore it, but you’re right, after repetition, it is a concern. But we’re planning on being strong mentally and forcing whoever is a ref to see that we’re very disciplined.

Having a coach come right out and say that he’s very aware of the past issues he’s had with an official is an incredible admission. It’ll be curious to see if the Lightning keep doing things their way or if they play a brand of hockey to get around what they think the official may or may not call. We’ve heard about teams in Major League Baseball scouting umpires to try and get an idea of how to pitch to their tendencies, but will we see that tonight in Tampa Bay? It’d be an out-of-the-box kind of thing to do, but given Boucher’s abilities to adjust on the fly it wouldn’t exactly be a shock if it happened.

While this provides a nice point of interest to keep an eye out in tonight’s game, the Lightning have special teams worries of their own to be more concerned about. While the Bruins power play continues to be poor, the Lightning haven’t been much better than them in this series. Tampa Bay is 2-17 on the power play in this series and those goals each came in the first two games of this series. Since then they’ve gone 0-9 on the power play as the Bruins have found ways to stifle them on the man advantage. What was a great bonus for them in previous rounds of the playoffs has turned into a problem.

If the officiating becomes the story tonight, don’t expect the fans to keep quiet about it and now that this airing of grievances has come out from Boucher, it’s going to grab headlines if it boils down that way. A little gamesmanship never hurt anyone after all.

Canucks stun Sharks 3-2 in double overtime to head to first Stanley Cup finals since 1994

7 Comments

It turned out to be a classic Game 5 between Vancouver and San Jose and one that will go down as one of the most bizarre finishes to a game in Stanley Cup playoffs history Canucks took out the Sharks in double overtime 3-2. The night’s game winner came thanks to a magical bounce off the glass that went right to Kevin Bieksa who knuckled home the game winner to beat Antti Niemi and send the Canucks to their first Stanley Cup finals appearance since 1994.

The first 60 minutes of the game went as up and down as you might expect with the teams trading goals and trading rushes to turn this game into an instant classic.

In the first period it was Alexandre Burrows getting the Canucks off on the right foot with a little help from Daniel Sedin and Henrik Sedin as they teamed up on a passing play that’s fitting for any highlight reel around.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

In the second period, the Sharks would continue to exert control over the game. Through two periods of  play the Sharks would outshoot the Canucks 25-11 and in the second, the Sharks would get one back on the power play, much the same way they have all series long, and here it would be Patrick Marleau apparently getting a stick on a point shot from Dan Boyle.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

In the third period, Devin Setoguchi would give the Sharks a 2-1 lead scoring 24 seconds into the period. With the way San Jose was dominating in shots on goal and in play all around, Vancouver’s task to get back into the game was a tall one.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

As the period wore on, the teams would trade chances and with the game into the final minute of play where things would get a bit controversial. San Jose’s Dan Boyle would clear the puck out of the San Jose end as the Canucks were turning up the pressure with Roberto Luongo out of the net for the extra attacker. The puck went all the way down and was touched up for icing. What the officials missed, however, is that the puck glanced off of Daniel Sedin’s back. That touch should’ve negated icing but instead the faceoff came in teh Sharks zone.

On that faceoff, the Canucks won it, controlled the play in the zone where Ryan Kesler would tip a Henrik Sedin shot past Antti Niemi (31 saves) to tie the game up with 13.2 seconds remaining in regulation. What was a dominating effort from San Jose was now reset with the teams headed to overtime and the Sharks playoff lives on the line.

The teams would trade chances in the first overtime but ultimately come away empty with the Sharks continuing to outshoot Vancouver in the first extra period, this time peppering Roberto Luongo for 16 shots. Overall in the game Luongo would prove to be electric stopping 54 shots. Fortunately for him, his efforts wouldn’t go to waste in the second overtime.

There, the teams took a bit more of a selective pace to the game as players grew more tired and taking chances became risky. The Canucks would get a great chance in second overtime as Chris Higgins would get a breakaway thanks to a Sharks mishandle in the neutral zone but Niemi would close the legs up and shut it down.

At 10:18 of the second overtime though, things would get weird as a Canucks attempted dump deep into the zone off the glass would hit a partition and bounce right back out to the point to Kevin Bieksa who took advantage of everyone else who thought the puck had either gone into the crowd or the netting as he ripped home a shot that beat Niemi for the goal sending Rogers Arena into jubilation. For Bieksa it was his fourth goal of the series and fifth in the playoffs.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

For Vancouver, it’s their first Western Conference championship since 1994 when they beat the Toronto Maple Leafs for the Campbell Bowl and a spot in the Stanley Cup finals. The Canucks clinched their spot in 1994 thanks to a double overtime goal as well. History is funny that way. For what it’s worth, Canucks captain would not even touch the trophy when NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly presented it to him following the game. Keep that in mind for all of your superstition needs.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

San Jose has nothing to hang their head about. Sure the series finished in five games, but the Sharks didn’t exactly play terrible in the series. Tonight they ran into a red hot Roberto Luongo and were vexed by a pair of fortunate bounces for the Canucks. In the series, the Canucks were just a better team and being beaten by the better team is expected in the playoffs. Some folks will talk about them being “chokers” or start lumping this Sharks team with others in the past that failed to live up to expectations, but that’s just not the case here.

Vancouver will now wait to see who they’ll face in the Stanley Cup finals be it Boston or Tampa Bay. Boston will have a chance to wrap up their spot in the final on Wednesday night in Tampa as they hold a 3-2 series lead. Should Boston make the final, it would be their first appearance since 1990 when the Bruins lost to a Mark Messier-led Edmonton Oilers team. If Tampa forces a Game 7, that will be played on Friday night in Boston.

Here are the highlights from Game 5.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!