Lawson Crouse

Evander Kane rips Player Safety for ‘ridiculous’ three-game suspension

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The NHL’s Department of Player Safety’s decisions have come under fire lately — even more than usual. Following his three-game suspension for elbowing Neal Pionk, Evander Kane absolutely unloaded on George Parros and other decision-makers.

In particular, Kane claimed that “bias transpires in this department.” The Sharks winger claims that they pick and choose who gets “the book” and who gets a pass.

” … No one person can tell you what is or isn’t a suspension in today’s game, it’s become a complete guess,” Kane wrote as part of his statement. “There is a major lack of consistency with NHL Department of Player Safety. A completely FLAWED system in so many ways.”

Kane shares examples of inconsistencies he sees from Player Safety

Kane pointed to Zdeno Chara being fined (instead of suspended) for cross-checking Brendan Gallagher in the face:

Kane also wondered why he was suspended while Lawson Crouse avoided discipline for what Kane believes was a similar hit:

Full statement from Kane on Player Safety

Kane tweeted out his statement:

Read Kane’s statement in text form, if that’s easier:

The fact the NHL Department of Player Safety headed by George Parros continue to pick and choose, who and what they suspend is ridiculous! There have been countless incidents of the same nature through this season and past seasons that have gone unsuspended or fined. No one person can tell you what is or isn’t a suspension in today’s game, it’s become a complete guess. There is a major lack of consistency with NHL Department of Player Safety. A completely FLAWED system in so many ways. From the suspensions to appeal rights, it’s baffling to me how we as players agreed to this. You can’t continue to give some players a pass and throw the book at others. There has to be a outside third party making these decisions to remove the bias that transpires in this department headed by George Parros. None of it makes any sense.

Explanation for suspension

It’s wise to consider the specific suspension for a moment.

The league did thoroughly explain Kane’s suspension. The video describes it as a “dangerous extension of the elbow outward and upward.” It also cited Kane’s suspension history, and history of delivering over-the-line elbows.

Kane’s statement doesn’t really go into much detail about the hit on Pionk itself. Instead, Kane focused on a perceived double-standard, or a lack of clarity. Merely traipse around Hockey Twitter for a bit and you’ll realize Kane is not alone.

Many believe that Zack Kassian should have been suspended for more than seven games for recklessly kicking at Erik Cernak with his skate blade. That Chara fine instead of suspension also ranks up among the more polarizing recent decisions. In general, plenty argue that the league needs to do a better job protecting stars; it’s all too common for Elias Pettersson and others to be targeted.

However you feel about Kane’s statement, it’s clear that this process has a lot of room to improve.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Bruins’ Lauzon suspended two games for hit on Coyotes’ Stepan

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The NHL suspended Bruins defenseman Jeremy Lauzon two games for his hit on Coyotes forward Derek Stepan.

The hit initially drew a match penalty during Boston’s 4-2 win on Saturday. The Department of Player Safety notes that Stepan’s head was the main point of contact, and could have been avoided. Additionally, the video explains that Lauzon elevated “unnecessarily,” thus making head contact.

Lauzon lacks a history of NHL suspensions, although Saturday marked just his 23rd game at this level. While it wasn’t mentioned in the video, Stepan returning to the game may have limited the suspension.

The league needed a quick turnaround on the decision, as the Bruins are facing the Red Wings on NBC (stream here) on Sunday.

Bruins fans responded to the announcement by sharing a Lawson Crouse hit on Charlie McAvoy from that same game:

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Crouse scores, leaves with injury as Coyotes beat Kings

LOS ANGELES — Lawson Crouse experienced it all against the Los Angeles Kings.

Crouse scored the go-ahead goal before a scary fall that forced him to leave the game, and the Arizona Coyotes held on to beat the Kings 3-2 on Saturday.

Phil Kessel and Christian Fischer also scored for the Coyotes, who have won five of seven, including a 3-0 home victory over the Kings on Monday. Antti Raanta made 43 saves for Arizona, which was outshot 45-18.

Anze Kopitar and Nikolai Prokhorkin scored for the Kings, whose five-game home winning streak ended. Jonathan Quick stopped 16 shots.

Crouse’s goal off a rebound in the second period put Arizona ahead 2-1. He left the game in the third period after he fell and hit his head awkwardly into the boards. After being checked by a trainer, he was helped off the ice, and he walked to the locker room.

“I just talked to him,” Coyotes coach Rick Tocchet said. “He didn’t think he was out, but I thought he might have been out. He was a little woozy right now, so we’ll see.”

Kessel opened the scoring with a power-play goal in the first period. The Coyotes got through the neutral zone quickly, and he scored on a give-and-go play, assisted by Keller and Derek Stepan.

Kopitar tied it at 1-1 in the second period on the power play, his team-best ninth goal of the season.

“When you’re down 1-0 against this team, it’s tough,” Kings center Blake Lizette said. “Their start and the lack of our start was the difference.”

Crouse scored at 15:29 of the second period and 27 seconds later, Clayton Keller was whistled for a hooking penalty. But the Kings came up empty on that power-play opportunity.

Fischer’s empty-netter made it 3-1 with 2:10 left in the game, but Prokhorkin responded quickly with the game’s final goal.

Fischer had a key block in the final minutes.

“I thought we did a good job starting out with our game and our game plan,” Fischer said. “It’s different playing at 1 p.m. Ice wasn’t that great. A lot of factors. I thought we held our own. We knew when we were turning the puck over that that’s how they were creating their offense. I thought we mixed it up in the third.”

HOCKEY FIGHTS CANCER

Saturday was Hockey Fights Cancer day, and Jacob Brown was honored before the game in the ceremonial first puck drop. The 12-year-old got to meet Drew Doughty and the Kings through the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Jacob is in remission after a battle with leukemia and was in full hockey gear. Doughty dropped the puck, and Jacob won the friendly draw against Oliver Ekman-Larsson. Jacob, an Alabama native and hockey player, signed a two-day contract with the Kings. The Hockey Fights Cancer auction raised over $28,000.

NOTES

Kings C Kopitar extended his team lead in points to 24. … Coyotes G Darcy Kuemper, a former King, didn’t play Saturday but is expected to start against Edmonton on Sunday.

UP NEXT

Coyotes: Host the Edmonton Oilers on Sunday in a matchup of the Pacific Division’s top teams.

Kings: Host the San Jose Sharks on Monday.

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Looking to make the leap: Lawson Crouse

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Hey, when you’re huge, you don’t need to make as much of a leap.

Florida Panthers GM Dale Tallon didn’t do the usual hemming and hawing you’d expect when talking up Lawson Crouse, the 11th overall pick of the 2015 NHL Draft. Instead, he threw down the gauntlet after signing the sizable young prospect to an entry-level contract in July.

“He was one of our best players in development camp and we are confident he can make an immediate impact on our roster, playing on one of our top lines,” Tallon said via a Panthers release.

It’s not just Tallon pumping him up, either, as head coach Gerard Galland said that Crouse “will be given every opportunity to earn a top-six forward position on our roster during training camp.”

That’s quite the accelerated outlook for a towering 18-year-old (listed at 6-foot-4, 215 lbs) whose offense seemingly came up short at times; Crouse managed just 51 points in 56 games at the OHL level in 2014-15.

Such modest production would leave the impression that the Panthers might be wise to allow Crouse to marinate at the junior level for at least a little while, yet it sounds like the organization thinks he’s on the right track. Florida might be growing a touch impatient with the slow-and-steady approach, and one can also imagine that they see an “NHL body” in Crouse.

Of course, it’s not as if the Panthers are committed to a decision yet. They can change their mind during training camp or even through a few regular season contests and decide to let him develop at a slower pace with no harm done.

All disclaimers aside, it sounds like he’ll get a real chance to make the roster right out of the draft.

Want to know more about Crouse? Check out this profile.

Lawson Crouse: ‘I’m a big power forward’

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When looking at the prospects for the upcoming NHL Draft many have heard of the likes of Connor McDavid and Jack Eichel – the two topped the NHL Central Scouting midterm rankings released this week.

At No. 4, behind Boston College defenseman Noah Hanifin, is a hulking 6-foot-4, 211-pound forward by the name of Lawson Crouse.

Crouse, who plays for the Kingston Frontenacs of the Ontario Hockey League, was listed at No. 3 on the International Scouting Services latest rankings released earlier this month.

“Everytime he’s out there, you know what he’s giving you,” said Benoit Groulx, who coached Crouse with Team Canada at the recent world junior hockey championship. “You know what he brings to the table. He’s a big body, likes to get involved. Smart player, solid with the puck. He’s solid also on the defensive game.”

The 17-year-old, who was a surprise to even make the Canadian team, spent much of the tournament on the fourth line registering a goal and three points in seven games.

Crouse has 16 goals and 23 points in 31 OHL games this season – a nice increase in production from the 15 goals and 27 points he registered in 63 games during the 2013-14 season.

“I’m a big power forward. I just try and bring it every night,” said Crouse describing his game. “If you want to play in the National Hockey League, I feel that’s what you have to do. I can score, but there are areas of my game that I’m strong at – in the defensive zone and doing the little things.

“That’s something that I focus on. Try and control the little things and do everything else.”

Crouse grew up idolizing current Colorado Avalanche veteran Jarome Iginla, but models his game after a couple of other NHL stars.

“Right now I like to watch Rick Nash and Milan Lucic- trying to find a balance between them both,” he said. “I have the ability to score, but I also have the meanness and ability to play physical like Lucic.”

Given his size, whoever selects Crouse in the first round in June could have an NHL-ready player for the start of next season.