Jeremy Roenick

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Who will make up the 2019 Hockey Hall of Fame class?

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(UPDATE: Guy Carbonneau, Vaclav Nedomansky, Hayley Wickenheiser, Sergei Zubov will be inducted in the “player” category, while Jim Rutherford and Jerry York will go in as “builders.” Read more about the Class of 2019 here.)

The 2019 Hockey Hall of Fame class will be announced on Tuesday afternoon and following a year where there were two locks in Martin Brodeur and Martin St. Louis, it’s pretty wide open for 2019 outside of Hayley Wickenheiser. There are a few first-year candidates like Dan Boyle, Patrik Elias, Vincent Lecavalier, and Brad Richards who might have some support, but will it be enough for induction?

Per the Hockey Hall of Fame, eligible players “must have not played in a professional or international hockey game during any of the three (3) playing seasons prior to his or her election.” A maximum of four male and two female inductees can be elected in the player category a year.

Let’s take a look at who Hall of Fame chairman Lanny MacDonald might be calling on Tuesday to give them the great news.

THE LOCK

Hayley Wickenheiser – Where do we begin? The hockey legend owns four Olympic gold medals representing Canada, plus seven more golds from the IIHF World Championship. She was the Olympic tournament MVP in 2002 and 2006 and is Canada’s women’s leader in goals (168), assists (211) and points (379) after playing 276 games internationally. 

While playing professionally in Finland, she became the first women to record a point in a men’s league. Wickenheiser also participated in two rookie camps with the Philadelphia Flyers and acted as a guest coach in camps with the Toronto Maple Leafs and Edmonton Oilers. She’s currently the Assistant Director of Player Development for the Leafs.

Wickenheiser will no-doubt become the seventh woman in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

THE POSSIBLES

Daniel Alfredsson – 444 goals, 1,157 points, Olympic gold and silver medals, 1996 Calder Trophy, six-time NHL All-Star, 2012 King Clancy Trophy. Alfie could be the beneficiary of no strong men’s player headlining the class. A veteran of 18 NHL seasons, the longtime Ottawa Senators captain has an impressive resume and strong international credentials to make the cut. He’s also known for scoring the first shootout goal in league history, and sported Hall of Fame worthy hairstyles over his career.

Curtis Joseph – 454 wins, 51 shutouts, Olympic gold medal, three-time All-Star. A three-time Vezina Trophy finalist, Joseph had himself a fine career, but unlike Osgood didn’t win a Cup. Is he in the Hall of Fame class or Hall of Very Good class? Only five goalies have been inducted into the Hall since 1973. Is it time we see more?

Boris Mikhailov – The man Herb Brooks loved to remind his “Miracle on Ice” team looked like Stan Laurel had a decorated career playing for CSKA Moscow and representing the Soviet Union internationally. Domestically, Mikhailov scored 429 goals for CSKA and recorded 653 points, leading them to 11 Soviet League titles. On the international scene, the long time captain captured two Olympic gold medals and eight World Championships. And remember that it’s not the NHL Hall of Fame, it’s the Hockey Hall of Fame.

[2018 HHOF class: Bettman, Brodeur, Hefford, O’Ree, St. Louis, Yakushev]

Alex Mogilny – He was the first Soviet player to defect west and when he arrived he quickly made his mark. His 76-goal season in 1992-93 tied him for the NHL’s goal scoring lead with Teemu Selanne. He would finish with a 127 points that season. A year later he was named the first European captain in NHL history by the Buffalo Sabres. When it was all said and done, the six-time All-Star scored 473 goals and recorded 1,032 points. He’s a member of the IIHF’s Triple Gold Club, which means you’re a winner of the Stanley Cup, Olympics and World Championship.

Jeremy Roenick – 513 goals, 1,216 points, nine-time All-Star, silver medals at Canada Cup and Olympic Games. JR’s elite level status only lasted for a few seasons in the early 1990s. After three-straight 100-point and 45-plus goal seasons, his production settled into the “very good” range in the mid-90s. He certainly has the “fame” part down with the personality he’s shown during and after his NHL career, as well as his influential role in the 1996 movie “Swingers.”

Doug Wilson – 237 goals, 827 points, 1982 Norris Trophy winner, eight-time All-Star, Canada Cup gold. You don’t hear the San Jose Sharks general manager’s name much when these discussions come up. He played during an era dominated by Paul Coffey and Ray Bourque, but examine his career and it was a pretty solid one. Top 20 in points by a deenseman, top 10 in points per game. Like Dave Andreychuk in 2017, there are always some surprise inclusions every few years. And here’s a good note from Sean McIndoe of The Athletic: “Here’s the complete list of players who both won a Norris Trophy (peak) and finished in the top 25 all-time in defenseman scoring (longevity), but haven’t been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame: Doug Wilson, and that’s it.”

Sergei Zubov – His 771 points puts him in the top 20 all-time among defensemen, as does his 0.72 points per game average. He has the 12th-most playoff points for defensemen with 112. Only Sergei Gonchar has more goals and points than Zubov among Russian blue liners. He’s a two-time Stanley Cup winner, four-time All-Star, and gold medalist at the Olympics and World Junior Championship. If Nicklas Lidstrom hadn’t dominated so much, how much more love would Zubov have received?

THE REST

Tom Barrasso – 369 wins, 38 shutouts, 1984 Calder Trophy, 1984 Vezina Trophy, 1985 Jennings Trophy, 1991 and 1992 Stanley Cup titles, 2002 Olympic silver medal.

Peter Bondra – 503 goals, 892 points, World Championship gold, five-time NHL All-Star, two-time 50-goal scorer.

Dan Boyle – 163 goals, 605 points, 1,093 games, Olympic gold, World Championships silver, one Stanley Cup, six seasons of 50-plus points.

Rod Brind’Amour – 452 goals, 1,184 points, 2006 Stanley Cup champion, 1994 World Championship gold, two-time Selke Trophy winner.

Patrik Elias – 408 goals, 1,025 points, Olympic bronze, two World Championships bronze medals, two-time Stanley Cup winner, nine 20-plus goal seasons.

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Theo Fleury – 455 goals, 1,088 points, seven-time All-Star, gold at the World Junior Championship, Canada Cup and Olympics, silver at the World Championship and World Cup of Hockey, 1989 Stanley Cup winner.

Sergei Gonchar – 220 goals, 811 points, five-time All-Star, 2009 Stanley Cup title (two more as a coach), silver and bronze medals from the Olympics and World Championships, eight 50-plus point seasons, five straight seasons with at least 18 goals.

Tomas Kaberle – 87 goals, 563 points, 2011 Stanley Cup, 2005 World Championship gold, 2006 Olympic bronze, four-time NHL All-Star.

Steve Larmer – 441 goals, 1,012 points, 1983 Calder Trophy, two-time All-Star, 1991 Canada Cup gold, 1994 Stanley Cup title, owns third-longest consecutive games streak in NHL history.

Vincent Lecavalier – 421 goals, 949 points, 2004 World Cup of Hockey gold and MVP, 2004 Stanley Cup, 2007 Rocket Richard Trophy, 2008 King Clancy Trophy, four-time NHL All-Star. It’s not quite the trophy case of 2018 inductee Martin St. Louis, so that could probably leave Lecavalier stuck in the Hall of Very Good.

Kevin Lowe – 84 goals, 431 points, six-time Stanley Cup winner, seven-time NHL All-Star, King Clancy Memorial Trophy winner.

Bernie Nicholls – 475 goals, 1,209 points, three-time All-Star, World Championship silver.

Kent Nilsson – 262 goals, 686 points, two-time NHL All-Star, 1987 Stanley Cup title, 1978 WHA rookie of the year, IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame, Canada Cup and World Championship silver medals. The man who inspired Peter Forsberg:

Chris Osgood – 401 wins, 50 shutouts, three-time Stanley Cup champion, two-time Jennings Trophy winner.  A good goalie on some great Detroit Red Wings teams for a long time. How much has that hurt his candidacy?

Brad Richards – 298 goals, 932 points, two-time Stanley Cup champion, Conn Smythe and Lady Byng Trophy winner, 2004 World Cup of Hockey winner, Memorial Cup champion.

Keith Tkachuk – 538 goals, 1,065 points, 1996 World Cup of Hockey champion, Olympic silver medal. Like Roenick, Tkachuk’s numbers are good, but he’s in a range where there are a handful of players with similar stats. While Joe Mullen’s inclusion may help Tkachuk or Roenick at some point in time, right now, he’s just on the outside.

Pierre Turgeon – 515 goals, 1,327 points, Lady Byng Trophy, five-time All-Star. A very good player for a very long time. But other than a Byng, no other individual honors to help him standout from the rest.

Mike Vernon – 385 wins, 27 shutouts, 1996 Jennings Trophy, 1989 and 1997 Stanley Cup titles and 1997 Conn Smythe Trophy, five-time All-Star. Also, key player in one of the league’s most memorable brawls:

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Jeremy Roenick provides shenanigans while lobster boating

In the latest edition of “Where in the World is Jeremy Roenick?” (not an actual title … yet?), we get some fun video footage of JR “hunting” for lobster in Boston before Game 5 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final (airing on NBC; stream here).

Roenick has a fun time with Captain Fred Penney of Two Buoys Lobster Tour. If you’re familiar with JR’s antics with locals, you’ll know that shenanigans will be had, and JR does not disappoint.

  • In an initiation that was probably made up, Roenick bites the head off of a fish. He doesn’t seem to enjoy it.
  • Roenick gets the pincher treatment.
  • New England accents are enjoyed … in fact, Penney insists that Roenick pronounces it lobstah.
  • A funny line about Roenick being a “Husky Medium.”

Good times, except for that fish and some lobsters.

MORE BLUES-BRUINS:

• Bruins get Chara for Game 5
• Three keys to Game 5

• Blues fans’ baby was in Stanley Cup 20 minutes after birth
• Laila Anderson bobblehead created to benefit St. Louis Hospital
• Bruins confident they can overcome injuries
• Blues defense benefiting from HOFer Larry Robinson’s experience

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

This video has: JR in green suit, NHL 94 references, Tappen gaming

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Jeremy Roenick has gone all-out for NBC Sports videos, but he was truly in elite form for All-Star weekend.

While certain moments of Roenick in a green suit might be filed under “Things You Can’t Un-See,” this video is a true gem for a few reasons.

  • Kathryn Tappen is the person gaming as Roenick goes Into the EA Hockeyverse, as a PS4 controller is used to play both “NHL 94” and “NHL 19.”
  • JR is definitely Dad Spider-Man, right?
  • Again, there were references to Roenick being really good in those 16-bit EA hockey games, by way of Vince Vaughn in “Swingers.” This is virtually always a good thing.
  • Roenick provides some goal celebrations and slapstick comedy.
  • Green. Suit.

Overall, it’s a lot to absorb, so enjoy.

Also, you will likely quite enjoy the 2019 All-Star Skills event tonight, and probably not come across as much nightmare fuel. Enjoy that on NBCSN on Friday.

[WATCH LIVE – NHL ALL-STAR SKILLS 8 P.M. ET – NBCSN]

Here’s the “Silicon Valley” riff that was referenced. Very cool:

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Video: Jeremy Roenick clearly isn’t afraid of snakes

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If you live in the desert, you have to expect the unexpected. It sure doesn’t seem like Jeremy Roenick has an issue with that.

On Sunday, the NHL on NBC hockey analyst posted a video that would be horrifying for some (like me), as he caught a snake in what appears to be his garage.

Not only did Roenick just use two golf clubs to catch it, he also didn’t hesitate to grab it before launching it over a wall.

Clearly, JR is the only one in the room that wasn’t completely terrified of the snake.

Of course, this isn’t the first time Roenick has gone head-to-head with some form of wildlife. He also attempted to go after an alligator on a golf course once (top). Clearly, the gator wanted to no part of him.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Jeremy Roenick recalls his gruesome jaw injuries (Video)

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“My face blew up bigger than a pumpkin.”

That’s how hockey star turned NBC analyst Jeremy Roenick described the first time he broke his jaw thanks to an errant shot by Boris Mironov. That moment broke his jaw in 23 places … and no, you didn’t read that previous sentence incorrectly; that was merely the first time JR broke his jaw.

The second provided the grisliest visuals, as Derian Hatcher made Roenick pay for a hit on Mike Modano. Roenick explained that he tried to keep going during a 5-on-3 to stick it to Hatcher and the Stars, but … well, that’s where it gets gross.

In a twist that’s very “hockey,” Roenick and Hatcher would become teammates for the Flyers during an alumni game at the 2011 Winter Classic:

(Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

Hey, at least it made for a good story and some mildly scarring images.

(Holds own jaw in sympathy pain.)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.