Humboldt Broncos

Humboldt Broncos’ Ryan Straschnitzki back on the ice after surgery

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Ryan Straschnitzki was one of the Humboldt Broncos seriously injured when their team bus was hit by a semi-truck back in April, 2018, killing 16 players, coaches, and staff, while also injuring 12 others.

Straschnitzki was paralyzed in the crash, and a few months back underwent a special experimental surgery in Thailand that implanted a stimulator device into his spine that allows the nerves in his brain to communicate with his lower body.

In the months that have followed the surgery he has made significant progress in his recovery, starting with movement in his legs, to taking steps at the end of November.

On Tuesday, he was able to get back on the ice in Thailand on a sled.

According to Leah Murray of Discover Airdrie, a Tim Horton’s that is opening in Thailand donated ice time (as well as some timbits) to allow him to return to the ice.

Ever since the accident his goal has been to make Canada’s Sledge hockey team, saying back in March of this year that his goal is to just keep playing hockey until he can’t.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

PHT Morning Skate: Life after Babcock; goalie gambles not paying off

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Confidence should be gained for the Maple Leafs now that Mike Babcock is gone and Sheldon Keefe is in. [Toronto Star]

• The fun is gone in Toronto. [Pension Plan Puppets]

• Babcock is out, but now the pressure is upped on management. [Leafs Nation]

• “The NHL has to stop letting player safety depend on referees’ judgment calls.” [RMNB]

• “Why punching your opponent in hockey is fine but spitting on him is not.” [The Guardian]

• A look at Connor McDavid, Leon Draisaitl and other NHL players carrying large offensive burdens for their teams. [ESPN]

• Jamie McGinn has been released from his tryout with the Blues, while Troy Brouwer inks a one-year deal. [Blues]

• Some goalie gambles haven’t paid off for a number of GMs. [Yahoo]

• It’s been a mixed bag of results for the Sabres’ blue line. [Die by the Blade]

• In good news for the Sabres, assistant coach Don Granato, who’s been out since Oct. 1 while battling severe pneumonia, was back at practice on Wednesday. [Buffalo Hockey Beat]

• The Blue Jackets have faced a pretty tough schedule to start the season. [1st Ohio Battery]

Yanni Gourde should not longer be considered underrated; he’s just that good. [Raw Charge]

• Sharks’ Evander Kane pushes growth of hockey at Oakland middle school. [NBC Sports Bay Area]

• Finally, a great development for Ryan Straschnitzki, who was paralyzed in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash last April:

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Lindholm on Viking clap; Malkin eyeing Saturday return

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Elias Lindholm on returning to Carolina for the first time since mocking the Hurricanes’ Viking clap after a February game: “I don’t know if I would have done it again. But it just happened. That time I got some heat for the fans in Carolina after the trade because I didn’t want to sign there. They booed twice during the game, and then I went up to Dougie (Hamilton) there and we were hitting each other with crosschecks here and there at the end of the game. I was kind of fired up and went with the flow.” [Sportsnet]

Evgeni Malkin returned to Penguins practice on Monday and hopes to be back in the lineup for their Saturday afternoon game against the Oilers. [Tribune-Review]

• Dennis Seidenberg has retired after 15 NHL seasons and is joining the Islanders as part of their player development staff. [Islanders]

• Are we witnessing Jonathan Drouin’s breakout year? [Habs Eyes on the Prize]

• Former Sabres head coach and current Coyotes assistant Phil Housley is happy for the team’s success this season, but isn’t looking into the past. [Buffalo Hockey Beat]

Connor Carrick of the Devils will be out 4-6 weeks with a broken finger. [Devils]

Logan Couture on the Sharks’ scoring issues: “That’s been a story this season, we aren’t finishing. I can’t be sitting at one goal right now. (Hertl) is at three, Timo’s at two. We’ve got to score some more goals. We’re at 12 games in and I can’t be sitting at one goal.” [NBC Sports Bay Area]

• Paralyzed in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash, Ryan Straschnitzk is heading to Thailand later this week for surgery that could help restore some of his movement. [Airdrie Today via CP]

• Would Eugene Melnyk ever sell the Senators? [Spector’s Hockey]

• An early season examination of the Panthers. [Panthers Parkway]

• Duante Abercrombie is taking the next step toward his NHL coaching dream with an assistant gig with NCAA Division III Stevenson University. [NHL.com]

• A look at some of the big summer moves that have yet to pay off. [Featurd]

• Joel Farabee has been impressing his Flyers teammates since being recalled from the AHL. [Inquirer]

• Goalies are the focus in this week’s fantasy hockey report. [RotoWorld]

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Former Humboldt Bronco aiming to make team again

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He survived the horrific bus crash that killed 16 and injured 13 more, including himself. And now a former Humboldt Broncos wants his shot at battling for his spot back.

Graysen Cameron was on the Bronco’s bus on April 6, 2018, when a semi-truck ran a stop sign at an intersection and slammed into the bus, which was carrying the team to its playoff date against the Nipawin Hawks in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League.

Cameron’s life was spared, but he suffered a broken back in the horrific crash. Now, after spending time with trainers of the Calgary Flames, the 20-year-old is ready to give it his best shot.

“My only focus is getting to Humboldt and being able to perform there. I don’t want to show up and be average, I want to make a name for myself in the league, and do whatever it takes to try and get a championship there,” Cameron told The Canadian Press.

Cameron spent last season in Red Deer, Atla., as an assistant coach with the Red Deer Midget AAA Optimist Chiefs, a team he played for prior to linking up with the Broncos.

Cameron told CP that making the team won’t be easy, nor with the pressure of people expecting him to make it.

While he said his comeback attempt is for himself, he wants to play for those who fell in the crash.

“They’re always there (on my mind), and I think I’m not going back for them, I’m going back for me,” he said. “But I’m playing for them. I’ll always play for them.”


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Healing slow to come for some after Humboldt crash

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The 13 players who survived the Humboldt Broncos bus crash one year ago in Canada are dealing with injuries ranging from paralysis and back pain to brain damage and mental health issues. A synopsis from The Canadian Press:

GRAYSEN CAMERON

The 19-year-old forward can’t play hockey again after suffering back injuries, a concussion and an eye injury. He had surgery in November to remove metal rods and screws in an attempt to improve his mobility. He has become an assistant coach for the Red Deer Optimist Chiefs, a team in the Alberta Midget Hockey League. Cameron had played with the team from 2015 to 2017 before joining the Broncos.

BRAYDEN CAMRUD

The 20-year-old forward overcame a severe concussion, loss of feeling in his left arm and neck problems. He also had some cuts on his hands. He has returned to play with the Broncos this season. Camrud continues to attend physiotherapy as a result of his injuries.

”Eventually I overcame everything and I’m here now,” he said in September. ”I’d say I’m close to 100% now and good to go.”

KALEB DAHLGREN

The 21-year-old forward suffered a fractured skull, a puncture wound in his head, a brain injury and six broken vertebrae in his back and neck. He also had blood clots in one arm and behind an eardrum. He is still in rehabilitation and is seeing a neurologist to determine if he will be able to play competitive hockey. He attends York University in Toronto full time and has committed to play for the university’s Lions hockey team.

”We are unsure if he will ever be able to play hockey again. His entire life revolved around hockey,” his family said in a victim impact statement during a court sentencing hearing in January for the truck driver who caused the crash. ”This accident has certainly turned his life upside down, not to mention that the brain injury significantly slowed his reading ability … We are unsure what the future holds but are thankful Kaleb survived the accident.”

BRYCE FISKE

The 21-year-old defenseman suffered a neck fracture, skull fracture, left shoulder fracture and pelvis fracture. His spleen was lacerated and his left lung was punctured. His jaw was fractured in four places. He’s missing two teeth and his tongue was severely injured. Fiske is studying commerce and playing hockey for the Ridgebacks at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

”Currently, Bryce is able to move freely on his own,” said a statement of facts entered at the sentencing hearing. ”He has a significant amount of jaw pain and is still in treatment for his injuries. The majority of his treatment is for his jaw; he will require at least one more surgery for his jaw to be reconstructed.”

MORGAN GOBEIL

The 19-year-old defenseman has a traumatic brain injury. He sustained multiple skull fractures, three facial fractures, broken ribs and lacerations to his liver and spleen. His family said in a statement in March that he spent 333 days in hospital. He has not yet regained his ability to walk or talk, but the family remains hopeful he will someday experience those milestones.

”He has endured many medical procedures and hours upon hours of physical, occupational, and speech therapy,” said his parents. ”During his time at the hospital, Morgan has celebrated his high school graduation, his brother’s wedding, his 19th birthday, several holidays and he has witnessed the change of all four seasons.”

MATTHIEU GOMERCIC

The 21-year-old forward had a separated shoulder, a concussion and cuts to his hand and chin. His spleen was enlarged, his teeth shifted and his jaw was slightly displaced. He still gets headaches and has problems with one shoulder. Gomercic has joined the Ridgebacks at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology and is studying kinesiology. He continues to deal with emotional issues on a daily basis.

”My son remembers moments before the accident and then remembers waking up outside the bus in the middle of this disaster,” his mother, Joanne Girard-Gomercic, wrote in her victim impact statement. ”Although he was in a lot of pain, he got up and looked around to see where he was. He was convinced it was a nightmare because he could not believe that what he was seeing was real. What he saw and heard that night will affect him for the rest of his life, in ways that are hard to predict.”

XAVIER LaBELLE

The 19-year-old defenseman suffered a fractured skull, facial fractures and deep lacerations, as well as a brain injury that led to amnesia for two weeks. The severe injuries made him unrecognizable after the crash, which resulted in a misidentification that led to further chaos and heartbreak. He continues to undergo surgeries and faces daily challenges.

”As a young man, Xavier has shown unbelievable courage over the last nine months as he comes to terms with his injuries and the terrible loss of so many teammates, friends and mentors,” said his mother, Tanya LaBelle, in her victim impact statement. ”Xavier’s injuries have affected him physically, mentally and emotionally. His goal and dream to play a higher level of hockey through a hockey scholarship was suddenly and brutally taken away from him in the most horrific circumstances.”

LAYNE MATECHUK

The 19-year-old defenseman suffered a severe brain injury. He had extensive facial fractures and a sternum fracture. Both of his lungs collapsed. He was in a coma for a month and had to learn to walk and talk again, but has left the hospital. He is able to walk with a significant limp. He also has difficulty using his one arm due to the brain injury.

”Layne has a traumatic brain injury which has left him to be such a different son than we had before the accident,” his father, Kevin Matechuk, said in his victim impact statement. ”He is angry and confused and cannot understand why this has happened and how his life has changed so much. These injuries have taken away everything. His dream to play hockey has been taken away.”

DEREK PATTER

The 20-year-old forward suffered bleeding outside his brain, as well as right shin and fibula fractures, a nasal bone fracture and significant cuts and bruises. He continues to struggle with his leg and a surgeon has recently told him he has more healing to do.

”He has recovered enough to return to playing with the Broncos organization this year,” his parents, Roy and Laurel Patter, said in their victim impact statement. ”Being one of the survivors brings immense stress for such young men: From grieving the loss of the 16 people that they were very, very close with all at once … to dealing with the recovery of their own injuries and the changes in their physical abilities … to watching each other struggle with recovery both mentally and physically while trying to stay strong for each other.”

NICK SHUMLANSKI

The 21-year-old forward sustained a fractured bone behind his ear and a lumbar avulsion fracture, but walked away from the crash. He has been told his ear may never heal but he doesn’t expect that will have a significant effect. His back seems to have healed, but he continues to deal with emotional issues. Shumlanski is playing hockey for the University of Prince Edward Island Panthers in Charlottetown.

”Nick began counselling shortly after his release from the hospital,” said his sister, Sydney Shumlanski, in her victim impact statement. ”It has been almost one year since the accident, and he is still unable to get onto a charter bus with his teammates in P.E.I. and go to the away games. He either drives himself to the games or joins someone from the coaching staff.”

TYLER SMITH

The 20-year-old forward had two broken ribs, a broken shoulder blade, a broken collarbone and a punctured lung. He had part of his small intestine removed due to the injuries. He also had a stroke and is expected to require annual MRIs. Smith returned to play with the Broncos in the fall, but decided to leave the team to continue his recovery at home. He said his physical injuries are nothing compared to the mental health issues some of his teammates face.

”There are a lot of guys that have to live with the pictures in their minds,” said Smith. ”That’s something I would never wish for anybody.”

RYAN STRASCHNITZKI

The 19-year-old defenseman suffered a concussion, brain bleeding, an injured right shoulder blade and a collapsed right lung. He was paralyzed from the chest down and the injury is expected to be permanent. Straschnitzki played in an exhibition sledge hockey charity game in Calgary in September and is hoping to eventually represent Canada at the Winter Olympics.

”I am beyond heartbroken that my big, beautiful boy will never get to realize his dreams in stand-up hockey,” said his mother, Michelle Straschnitzki, in her victim impact statement.

”Ryan has near-perfect recall of the crash and the ensuing carnage,” she said. ”I cry daily over all that was lost that night.”

JACOB WASSERMANN

The 19-year-old goalie suffered a brain injury, a broken shoulder blade, fractured ribs and nasal bone fractures. Both of his lungs collapsed and a spinal cord injury resulted in paralysis from the navel down. Wassermann attends physiotherapy three times a week to get stronger and learn new ways to live with paralysis. He has started to have movement in his hips, his father, Kirby Wasserman, said in November. He has also turned to sledge hockey to keep his on-ice dream alive.