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PHT Morning Skate: Tom Hanks, Martin Short and OHL

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Plenty of bits in Elliotte Friedman’s latest “30 Thoughts” column, with one of the more intriguing bits being the Los Angeles Kings’ easier said than done goal of knocking Drew Doughty‘s ice time down from 29 to 25 minutes per game. Bold prediction: split the difference and expect 27. (Sportsnet)

As far as CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty is concerned, many (now-former) Boston Bruins were simply “too soft” in 2014-15. (CSNNE.com)

The five greatest moments of Simon Gagne’s career. (The Hockey News)

What we can gleam from the NHL’s first games ever. (Greatest Hockey Legends)

The lion really sells Jonathan Bernier‘s new mask:

Someone wants to make a fourth Mighty Ducks movie, but Disney apparently isn’t particularly interested. (BarDown)

From the “Um, What?” files: Martin Short and Tom Hank cheer on … the OHL’s Hamilton Bulldogs?

Quick hits: Rheaume’s return, Coach Q’s milestone and more

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Plenty is going on heading into Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final. Here are a few things that you may find interesting, even if they’re not full-blown posts.

  • Remember Manon Rheaume, the first (and only) woman to play in an NHL exhibition game? She did so with the Tampa Bay Lightning more than 20 years ago, and tonight mark’s her first visit back. Sportsnet’s has a fantastic Q & A session with her, which includes the shocking realization that she never heard of David Letterman before appearing on his show.
  • Dynasty talk often boils down to semantics. The bottom line is that the Chicago Blackhawks have done some special things, and you can see that in one form by noticing the milestones head coach Joel Quenneville (pictured) is starting to pile up. Game 2 marks Coach Q’s 200th career postseason game behind an bench, becoming just the third coach to do so. The list is as elite as they get, too:

One would expect him to pass New York Islanders great Al Arbour, but legend Scotty Bowman’s mark is almost certainly safe.

Quenneville’s record is impressive, too, as he heads in with a 112-87 record in playoff games coached.

  • Should we expect overtime tonight? The league points out that four straight Game 2’s have gone beyond regulation. (Grinds extra coffee beans.)

  • Obvious point alert: the Lightning really, really need to win this one.

Opportunity booms: Habs promote Blake Geoffrion

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Just about any player carries pressure with him when he puts on that beautiful Montreal Canadiens sweater. Still, it’s say to say that Blake Geoffrion will probably feel the boom of fireworks more than most when he makes his Habs debut tomorrow.

The Canadiens colors run deep for him and – let’s be honest – this an incredibly cool moment. Geoffrion is the first fourth-generation player in NHL history and a member of each generation spent at least some time for the Montreal Canadiens:

Howie Morenz (great-grandfather) – Won three Hart Trophies, died at age 34 due to complications from a broken leg suffered during his final NHL game.

Bernie “Boom Boom” Geoffrion (grandfather) – Popularized the slap shot, won six Stanley Cups and one Hart Trophy.

Dan Geoffrion (father) – Played 32 of 111 career NHL games with Montreal.

So to review: his grandfather and great-grandfather both had their numbers retired, with Morenz’s  No. 7 being the first Habs sweater to receive that honor. (At least his dad eased the pressure a bit by not being a Hall-of-Famer, though.)

Geoffrion’s lineage makes it a truly special story, but Blake has a chance to make a mark of his own. It’s not like he’s just some guy with a famous last name, either. The Nashville Predators made him the 56th choice (second round) of the 2006 NHL Entry Draft before packaging the young player in the Hal Gill deal.

It’s a great story that could get even more fascinating if he makes an impact in more direct hockey terms. At 24 years old, he still has plenty of time to do just that.

(Meanwhile, Louis Leblanc was sent down to the AHL. Judging by his last name, he probably knows his fair share of scrutiny in Montreal, too …)