Henrik Sedin

Keith Yandle seems very nonchalant about his iron man streak of 866 games

Panthers defenseman Keith Yandle discussed his “iron man streak” of 866 consecutive games played with Mike Tirico on “Lunch Talk Live.” And Yandle discussed the pain he’s gone through to maintain that streak in such a deadpan way, it was kind of funny, and can also add to the brimming binder titled “hockey players are tough.”

Maybe that’s simply necessary to play 866 games in a row in the modern NHL. Yandle’s mark, by the way, ranks fourth all-time in league history. To be fair, Yandle has some immediate competition among active players Patrick Marleau and Phil Kessel, though:

1. Doug Jarvis – 964
2. Garry Unger – 914
3. Steve Larmer – 884
4. Yandle – 866
5. Marleau – 854
6. Kessel – 844

(Andrew Cogliano’s seventh-ranked 830-game streak ended controversially with a suspension.)

It’s interesting to note how many modern players own some of the biggest streaks, as Jay Bouwmeester (737, ninth) and Henrik Sedin (679, 10th) saw their runs end recently.

Perhaps it’s a testament to modern conditioning and diet; Yandle noted to Alex Prewitt in 2018 that he also holds a distinction of not ordering room service on the road. In the cases of Sedin and Kessel, maybe you attribute some of that to style. Staying healthy doesn’t usually come down to being the “hitter” rather than receiving the brunt of the abuse. In many cases, it’s about avoiding contact altogether.

Yet, while Yandle plays more of a finesse style, his interview with Tirico reminds that it hasn’t always been easy.

Biggest threats to Yandle maintaining his iron man streak

Again, Yandle quite nonchalantly discussed some of the near-missed-games. (Maybe it’s that “Boston dry funny sense of humor?”)

Yandle faced arguably the biggest threat to his iron man streak this season, in November. The Panthers defenseman took a puck to the face during the first period of a Nov. 23, 2019 game against the Hurricanes. Despite losing multiple teeth, Yandle didn’t just keep his iron man streak alive, he actually returned during the game against Carolina.

During the interview with Tirico, Yandle’s expression rarely changed while discussing those agonizing events. Again, Yandle ranks among tough hockey players, whether his sometimes downright odd critics want to admit it or not.

Yandle went through hours of painful dental work, and still managed to complete a back-to-back set. Remarkable.

Also, back in December 2016, then-Panthers coach Tom Rowe expected Yandle to be out “a while” after what looked like a bad foot injury. In the Tirico interview, Yandle said an Aaron Ekblad shot “shattered” the back of his foot.

Naturally, “out for a while” meant not missing a single game.

It all makes me wonder: will Yandle’s streak eventually end as a “coach’s decision?”

The 33-year-old’s still an important piece of the Panthers’ puzzle. While he’s seen his ice time plummet over the years (24:29 TOI in 2017-18; 22:27 in 2018-19; 19:42 in 2019-20), Yandle remains prominent.

But with the Panthers struggling to support Sergei Bobrovsky — and/or struggling to justify the cost of Bob — might they decide that Yandle’s too much of a “double-edged sword?” Yandle’s puck movement, skating, and offensive acumen might make him a “net positive,” but the criticisms of his defense aren’t mere myths.

His Evolving Hockey RAPM chart from 2019-20 isn’t really out of line with Yandle’s usual work:

Could poor defense threaten Keith Yandle iron man streak
via Evolving Hockey

It’s never a popular move to sit someone who’s on a Ripken-of-hockey streak, but it’s a scenario worth considering, especially since Joel Quenneville has the political clout to make such a decision. Even if it’s probably ultimately unlikely, and painful.

You know, like returning to the same game when you got about 20 percent of your teeth knocked out by a puck.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

The Buzzer: Pastrnak hat trick; Markstrom does Swede job honoring Sedin twins

Jacob Markstrom points to retired Sedin twins jerseys
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Three Stars

1. Jacob Markstrom, Vancouver Canucks

Consider this a 1a/1b situation with the player listed next. Really, though, it’s matter of taste.

Either way, Markstrom produced one heck of a performance. Markstrom managed a 49-save shutout after watching the Sedin twins’ retirement ceremony.

When you look at the Canucks’ 3-0 record, you might assume that Vancouver fed off the energy of that ceremony. If they did, they had a funny way of showing it. The Blackhawks managed a 49-20 shots on goal advantage, yet couldn’t beat Markstrom one time.

Markstrom stands out as rock for Vancouver, especially lately. In winning two games in a row, Markstrom stopped 85 out of 87 shots faced.

2. David Pastrnak, Boston Bruins

Again, this is a tough call. Pastrnak generated a hat trick on Wednesday, leading Boston to a helpful win against the hated Habs. “Pasta” now has two hat tricks against Montreal this season, and eight goals against the Canadiens in four games.

By scoring three goals, Pastrnak stands alone as the goals leader this season with 41.

That said, he got some help, particularly when Brad Marchand set the table for Pastrnak with a ludicrous display of skill.

3. Brandon Sutter, Vancouver Canucks

The Canucks faced off against the Blackhawks, and the Bruins prevailed. It really was a fitting jersey retirement night for the Sedins, eh?

Markstrom carried the Canucks on his back, but Sutter was involved in all three Vancouver goals. Sutter collected an empty-net goal and two assists. That included a primary assist on the game-winner. While the Flames squandered a chance to earn breathing room, Vancouver is in a solid position to win the Pacific.

Highlight of the Night

Marchand pounced on a turnover, bamboozled a bunch of Canadiens, then sent a tremendous assist to Pastrnak:

Sedin jerseys retired

This post has more on the speeches, appearances, and ribbing, but check out the Sedin ceremony here:

Factoids

  • Markstrom generated a 43-save shutout against Carolina on Dec. 12. Factoring in that, Markstrom became the first Canucks goalies to generate two 40+ save shutouts during the same season. Naturally, Markstrom drew attention to the Sedin twins when the crowd honored his big night. (NHL PR)
  • The Canucks note that Markstrom’s 49-save shutout is the most in franchise history.
  • Here is a fun side-by-side comparison of Henrik and Daniel Sedin from the league:

  • Pastrnak didn’t just jump into the Maurice Richard Trophy lead on Wednesday. Pastrnak joined Alex Ovechkin (tied for second at 40 goals) as the only two players with four hat tricks this season. The winger would need three more to match Phil Esposito’s seven from 1970-71 as the most in Bruins’ history, though. (NHL PR)
  • Hey, Pastrnak joined Ovechkin in another specific-yet-impressive category. Pastrnak and Ovechkin rank as the only active players to reach nine hat tricks (playoffs + regular season) before turning 24. “Pasta” has time to earn more, as he doesn’t turn 24 until May 25. Wayne Gretzky holds the overall record with a patently absurd 36. (NHL PR)

Scores

BOS 4 – MTL 1
LAK 5 – CGY 3
VAN 3 – CHI 0

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Canucks treat Sedin twins to great jersey retirement ceremony

The Sedin twins received fantastic treatment — and some razzing — during their jersey retirement ceremony. Naturally, the Canucks paid a wonderful tribute to their careers, and even the Blackhawks did their part.

Plenty of memorable Canucks showed up for this great jersey retirement ceremony. Kevin Bieksa provided the light bit of roasting. Contemporary Canucks worse Henrik Sedin’s 33 or Daniel Sedin’s 22 before the game. Roberto Luongo, Markus Naslund, Mason Raymond, Mike Gillis ranked among those at hand. Really, it’s tough to think of anything that was missing from the Sedin twins jersey retirement ceremony.

(Canucks fans even “forgave” Kesler with a rousing ovation.)

The Sedins began their speech sharing their thoughts for Jay Bouwmeester. From there, they hit the high notes, and sprinkled in cliches about best fans in the world. They also acknowledged their rivalry with the visiting Blackhawks, “even Duncan Keith.”

Odes spanned beyond the Blackhawks and Canucks, with fellow Swedes paying respects to the Sedins:

The ceremony presents a golden opportunity to look back at what may end up as a truly one-of-a-kind combination.

 

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

My Favorite Goal: Sedins give Canucks fans one last memory

Welcome to “My Favorite Goal,” a regular feature from NBC Sports where our writers, personalities and NHL players remember the goals that have meant the most to them. These goals have left a lasting impression and there’s a story behind each one.

Today, Vancouver Canucks captain Bo Horvat recalls the memorable overtime winner by Daniel Sedin in the final game at Rogers Arena for the Sedin twins.

Bo Horvat was in his fourth NHL season when the Sedins played their last one. On the night of their final game at Rogers Arena, the twins gave Canucks fans one last memory when Henrik set up Daniel for the power play winner in overtime.

PREVIOUSLY ON MY FAVORITE GOAL:
Darren McCarty shows off goal-scoring hands during 1997 Cup Final
Alex Ovechkin scores ‘The Goal’ as a rookie
Marek Malik’s stunning shootout winner
Paul Henderson scores for Canada
• Mario Lemieux’s end-to-end masterpiece; Hextall scores again
Tomas Hertl goes between-the-legs
Borschevsky’s goal sealed with a kiss
Bolland clinches Cup for Blackhawks 17 seconds later
Stoll completes Kings’ upset over Canucks

PHT Morning Skate: Protecting Pettersson; more on Zucker trade

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Ken Campbell nails it in discussing the abuse thrown Elias Pettersson‘s way. Really, it applies not only to protecting Pettersson, but all star players. (The Hockey News)

• The Sedin Twins understand what Pettersson is going through. Unfortunately, their advice boils down to “you just gotta deal with it.” (Vancouver is Awesome)

• Believe it or not, the Sedin twins are still close friends. Who would have thought? (Although twins could get tired of each other, theoretically, so maybe it is impressive …) (Sportsnet)

• Need a connection between the NHL and the inescapable Coronavirus? Apparently the crisis is affecting the supply of sticks. Imagine a scenario where crusty hockey people live their random dream of wooden sticks making a brief comeback … (Boston Globe)

• Oilers fans winced at Connor McDavid hurting his knee. If they (and fans of the sport in general) want a slight silver lining, consider that McDavid claims it’s not related to his off-season injury. (Sportsnet)

• Mathieu Schneider came away from meetings regarding an Olympic return feeling “happy” from the NHLPA perspective. That might be a moot point if the league remains cool to the premise of participating in 2022, but it’s better than nothing. (TSN)

[NHL ON NBCSN: Ovechkin continues chase for 700 Thursday vs. Avalanche]

• During much of the season, the Penguins persisted with strong puck possession stats despite injuries. Adam Gretz details some discouraging recent trends, though. Then again, maybe generally defensively sound winger Jason Zucker could help a bit in that regard? (Pensburgh)

• Calen Addison ranks as one of the Wild’s most important returns in the Zucker trade. Corey Pronman breaks down what Minnesota is getting in the defensive prospect. (The Athletic, sub required)

• It’s tough to wrap your head around the idea of the Rangers actually buying out Henrik Lundqvist. Granted, that might be a pretty practical way to keep two younger goalie options. Blue Seat Blogs explains the potential pros and cons of such a buyout. (Blue Seat Blogs)

• Why the Maple Leafs should trade Tyson Barrie. (The Leafs Nation)

• Scroll through this interesting thread about how the 2012 NHL Draft ranks among the worst. Maybe the Blue Jackets were reasonable in rejecting the Islanders’ entire 2012 stock when Garth Snow came calling for Ryan Murray? (Benjamin Wendorf)

• Jaromir Jagr and Gordie Howe: two peas in a pod. (Featurd)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.