Florida Panthers

PHT Morning Skate: Top free agents; O’Reilly up for ‘unique’ challenge

Leave a comment

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• A look at the top 50 free agents who could hit the market at some point in the next few months. [TSN]

• Which UFA moments have defined the NHL’s salary-cap era? [Sportsnet]

Ryan O'Reilly is up for the “unique” challenge of helping the Blues defend their Stanley Cup title. [NHL.com]

• “There are health risks for the players who will be quarantined in hub cities for the Stanley Cup playoffs, but their concerns don’t end there. It’s possible the players will be paying for the lost revenues caused by COVID-19 for years.” [The Hockey News]

• On players potentially opting out of playing if the NHL resumes this summer. [NBC Sports Washington]

• It’s not looking good for Alexander Romanov, Kirill Kaprizov, and Ilya Sorokin in their attempts to play this season. [Hockey Wilderness]

• The NHL should thank college hockey for producing so many impactful young defensemen. [Grand Forks Herald]

• What Alexis Lafreniere would mean to the Blackhawks. [NBC Sports Chicago]

• Why Shane Doan should be in the Hockey Hall of Fame. [Five for Howling]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Rested Phil Kessel thinks he can get back on track as Coyotes await NHL return

Leave a comment

By just about any measure, 2019-20 marked a disappointing debut season for Phil Kessel with the Arizona Coyotes. Kessel acknowledged his “tough year,” but believes that he can bounce back as an NHL return looms.

“Obviously I had a tough year,” Kessel told Alex Kinkopf of the Coyotes website. “I think it’s probably the most injuries I’ve had in a year, but that’s no excuse, right? It’s one of those years, and obviously I’m going to look to never have that again. I’ve never had a year like that.”

Kessel pointed to the pandemic pause, saying that his body “feels good” and that he’s rested.

Of course, just about any returning player probably expects to rebound from a bad season. Especially a driven one like Kessel, a player who’s reached considerable heights — both individually, and by helping the Penguins win two Stanley Cups.

But the question is: does Kessel have the ability to rebound after a 14-goal, 38-point letdown?

Kessel thinks he can bounce back, but he needs a rebound from beyond his Coyotes debut

The more interesting question is: can Kessel regain a form from longer ago?

Yes, Kessel still produced even as things soured with the Penguins (Evgeni Malkin, or otherwise). You can look at point-per-game production in 2018-19 (82 points in as many games) and even better 2017-18 numbers and think that Kessel was at his peak.

But the criticisms that once unfairly dogged Kessel caught up to him quite a while before Kessel joined the Desert Dogs. Plenty of metrics indicated that Kessel’s defensive game nullified his offense. Depending upon what you weigh and who you ask, some viewed him as a net negative toward the end of his Penguins days:

Really, the defensive criticisms of Kessel have frequently been warranted — it’s just that the tenor’s been overly harsh. Attribute it to advancing age at 32 or whatever else, but Kessel at some point declined from “worth the trouble” to “not nearly productive enough to look away” during the past few seasons.

Pandemic pause could negate (some of the) possible downside of that “ironman” streak

But one interesting consideration is: maybe Kessel has been playing at less than 100 percent for quite often?

Consider the lengths Keith Yandle has gone to maintain his league-leading active games played streak of 866 games. Kessel is right behind Yandle with an 844-game “ironman” streak of his own. Perhaps Kessel — a perceived stubborn player — has sometimes played when he shouldn’t have?

This pandemic pause gave Kessel no choice but to be more rested. Or at least not to play professional hockey.

There’s absolutely a chance that such a break would be bad for a professional athlete. Some rely on playing games and practicing to stay in shape, rather than supplementing with training.

Yet, if you want to be optimistic about Kessel returning to form, then the break is a legitimate reason to focus on. Just realize that even the “best” Kessel will probably take something from the table — you just have to hope he brings more than he takes away.

If nothing else, it would be fun to watch Kessel if he got a new lease on life with the Coyotes, both against the Predators during the Qualifying Round and possibly beyond.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Reports: Edmonton, Toronto emerge as hub city favorites

9 Comments

As the NHL and NHLPA continue hammering away at a return-to-play plan, we’re closer to learning which two cities will act as hubs.

According to TSN’s Bob McKenzie and ESPN’s Emily Kaplan, Edmonton and Toronto have emerged as the likely destinations. Once details on Phase 3 (training camp) and Phase 4 (games being played) are finalized, the agreement would then need to be ratified by the entire Players’ Association and voted on by the NHL’s Board of Governors. Those votes could take place later this week.

Since Commissioner Gary Bettman announced the league’s return-to-play plan in May, Las Vegas was seen as a lock. But the number of COVID-19 cases has surged recently, prompting both sides to look to Canada should play resume later this summer.

[MORE: NHL announces return-to-play plans]

The NHL entered Phase 2 last month, allowing players to hold voluntary workouts in small groups. The tentative plan is to open full training camps in mid-July with games taking place beginning in early August.

This is all subject to an NHL/NHLPA agreement, which could also include an extension to a Collective Bargaining Agreement that is set to expire in Sept. 2022. That deal would see a cap on escrow at 20% for 2020-21, and one season where players would defer 10% of their salary. That money would be returned to them in the future. The salary cap ceiling would also be set at around $81.5 million for the next three seasons. Compliance buyouts are not expected be part of any agreement.

And according to Pierre LeBrun, Olympic participation in 2022 and 2026 would also be in the deal between the league and union. That would then require further discussions with the International Olympic Committee before players would get the green light to go.

MORE:
NHL: 26 players have tested positive for COVID-19 since Phase 2 began
A look at the Eastern Conference matchups
Final standings for 2019-20 NHL season, NHL draft lottery results
A look at the Western Conference matchups

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL player signing bonuses to reportedly be paid on schedule

Leave a comment

It’s July 1, which means we’re used to waking up and expecting a ton of players changing teams with the opening of free agency. Instead, we’re wondering if training camps will open up next week and if we’ll see a completion to the 2019-20 NHL season later this summer.

While the league and the NHLPA have agreed to an extension on all expiring player contracts, those players currently signed who are due July 1 signing bonuses will get their money. According to TSN’s Bob McKenzie, over $300 million is expected be paid out to players on Wednesday following an agreement between the league and union. Though, with holidays in Canada and the U.S. this week it may take a few days to actually hit their bank accounts.

[Reports: Edmonton, Toronto emerge as hub city favorites]

That’s good news for the likes of Auston Matthews ($15.2M), Mitch Marner ($14.3M), Connor McDavid ($13M), Artemi Panarin ($12M), Roman Josi ($11M), and Erik Karlsson ($10M) (per CapFriendly), among many others. Not so fun news for the Maple Leafs, who will be shelling out nearly $60M in bonus money.

When teams would pay out signing bonuses was one of many details the NHL and NHLPA have been working on since the return-to-play plan was announced. With the goal to open full training camps by mid-July, both sides are hoping to announce an extension to the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Once an agreement is in place, the next step will be a full vote by the union and among the league’s Board of Governors before moving forward.

 MORE:
NHL: 26 players have tested positive for COVID-19 since Phase 2 began
A look at the Eastern Conference matchups
Final standings for 2019-20 NHL season, NHL draft lottery results
A look at the Western Conference matchups

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Will players opt out?; Dumba on Hockey Diversity Alliance

Leave a comment

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from the NHL and around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Maple Leafs goalie Frederik Andersen on the NHL’s Return to Play plan: “I’m not quite 100 per cent confident yet. I think the league is very adamant about working towards that [return]. I think once we get to the hub cities, everyone has to be confident [in those] and that the league will have a good setup. So once we get there we’ll be good, but I think it’s a matter of getting there first. It looks like there’s some more things that need to be ironed out first.” [TSN]

• Potential Calder Trophy winner Quinn Hughes on how he’s feeling after four months off: “I feel as strong as I’ve ever been, so I’m confident, excited and ready to come back here.” [NHL.com]

• Will we see NHL players opt out of returning to play? [Sin Bin Vegas]

• If the NHL resumes play later this summer, the Blue Jackets will have Alexandre Texier back from injury. [Blue Jackets]

• On Matt Dumba, the Hockey Diversity Alliance and how he’s pushing the sport to become more inclusive. [NBC News]

• The ZSC Lions have given head coach Rikard Gronborg an early two-year extension. Gronborg, who’s been linked to NHL jobs in the last few off-seasons, has an out-clause in his deal for the 2022-23 season. [Swiss Hockey News]

• How Rangers head coach David Quinn leans on Lindy Ruff and Chris Drury for their playoff experience. [Forever Blueshirts]

• Five questions with David Andrews, the longtime commissioner of the AHL who retired on Tuesday. [NHL.com]

• Rick Dudley, the Hurricanes’ Hockey Ops VP, will not have his contract extended by the team. [News and Observer]

• Alexis Lafreniere donning the bleu, blanc et rouge? The draft lottery outcome has given us that possible outcome. [Sportsnet]

• From the barber poles to the classics, a look at the best and worst Canadiens jerseys. [Hockey by Design]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line atphtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.