Doug Gilmour

NHL players’ favorite Stanley Cup memories as fans

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Leading up to Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final (Monday, 8 p.m. ET, NBC), Pro Hockey Talk will be looking at every aspect of the matchup between the Boston Bruins and St. Louis Blues.

Not every player has photos of themselves as young fans in team-appropriate jammies like John Tavares with the Toronto Maple Leafs, so it can be fun and surprising to hear about their memories. Sometimes you’d be surprised to learn more about a players’ roots, and rooting interests.

In the fun video above, a variety of NHL players share some of their favorite Stanley Cup memories. You’ll see some expected moments, such as Brandon Dubinsky and Cam Atkinson recalling Mark Messier and the 1994 New York Rangers lifting that curse. The video also reminds us of how dominant the Colorado Avalanche were, as evidenced by a reminiscent Ryan Reaves. And, shield your eyes, Sabres fans, as a foot is, again, in the crease.

There are some other interesting touches. One mildly sad aspect is that Canadian NHL’ers P.K. Subban and Tyler Seguin point to a Doug Gilmour wraparound goal … even though it wasn’t associated with a Stanley Cup win.

You also might be intrigued to learn who mentioned Chris Pronger battling Dustin Byfuglien during the 2010 Stanley Cup Final, which player pointed to Teemu Selanne’s tearful Stanley Cup win, and some other moments. You may also notice a much younger Gary Bettman during certain moments.

It’s good stuff overall, so enjoy.

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James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Former Cup winners seem to agree with scratching Radulov, Kostitsyn for Game 4

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Luke Fox of Sportsnet spoke to several former Stanley Cup winners and they seem to have two pieces of advice: Don’t miss curfew during the playoffs and don’t mess with a winning lineup.

That seems to support Nashville’s decision to suspend Alexander Radulov and Andrei Kostitsyn for Game 3 of the second round. The Predators ended up earning a 2-0 victory without those two, so coach Barry Trotz decided that both of them would be healthy scratches on Friday.

“The old saying is, it doesn’t matter if you’re two seconds or one minute late, you might as well be three hours late,” Doug Gilmour said. “Curfews are there for a reason, and you gotta follow them.”

Mike Krushelnyski, who won the Stanley Cup as a player and then a coach also sided with the Predators.

“As a coach, I would leave my lineup,” Krushelnyski said. “I wouldn’t insert them back in. One, you’ve won the [previous] game. Two, you’ve gained momentum, and hopefully they can continue. If [Trotz] loses the next game, then he’s going to bring them in, and he can use it as a tool: We can strengthen our team with these two guys.”

Krushelnyski admitted that it wasn’t unheard of for players to break curfew back when he was a member of the Edmonton Oilers, but they were much stricter about it in the playoffs.

Bryan Trottier was a member of the Islanders’ dynasty back in the 1980s and later won back-to-back Stanley Cups with the Pittsburgh Penguins in the early 1990s. He never heard of players missing curfew on his teams.

“Curfew was a high priority, something every player respected,” Trottier said. “Accountability in the locker room was a high priority. From the time I walked into the Islanders to the time I left the Penguins, it was always, ‘Hey, guys, let’s make sure we’re focused on all the things that are necessary,’ and that was one of them.”

Of course, Radulov and Kostitsyn have already served their time and odds are that they haven’t played in their last playoff game. The question is: How will they respond when they finally get a chance at redemption?

Doug Gilmour is now the proud owner of DougGilmour.com

Big year for Doug Gilmour. First, he gets inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Then, he wins a Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution proceeding for the rights to DougGilmour.com.

Huzzah!

In a case heard on Dec. 7, the former Toronto Maple Leafs star won his namesake back from a guy named Matt Parsa, who claims to be Gilmour’s “biggest fan.”

Parsa said he was using the site as a fan appreciation page, though Gilmour’s legal team contended it was being used as a portal to the commercial website “www.hockeyvideohighlights.com” (which expired on Dec. 11.)

Parsa also argued that Gilmour’s likeness didn’t belong to Gilmour, but rather the National Hockey League. That’s quite the legal can o’ worms he was trying to pry open.

Anyway, the case is now closed and the domain name belongs to Killer. Here’s hoping he does something useful with it, like turn it into a portal for amusing kitten pictures.

https://i1.wp.com/www.lolcats.com/images/u/07/34/lolcatsdotcomapif8cpspt0k87dj.jpg

Video: Why this Hall of Fame class was so special

This year’s induction class to the Hockey Hall of Fame was one teeming over with talent. With great forwards like Joe Nieuwendyk and Doug Gilmour, the impeccable goaltending of Ed Belfour, and the defensive prowess as well as the long wait Mark Howe had to get in it’s a special group to behold.

The NHL Overtime crew of Tony Amonte and John MacLean discuss what made each of these guys so special to watch.

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Mark Howe’s fitting tribute to his father Gordie

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Mark Howe lived in the shadow of his famous father Gordie … until he turned out to be an excellent professional in his own right. His inclusion in the Hockey Hall of Fame should make that perfectly clear.

That doesn’t mean Mark didn’t appreciate the hockey legend’s presence in his life and he made that clear in his speech, as he donned Gordie’s iconic Detroit Red Wings number nine jersey. (View his full speech here.)

That was arguably the most memorable moment of the night, but you might want to check out the other three inductees’ speeches. Here they are, in alphabetical order:

Ed Belfour:

Doug Gilmour:

Joe Nieuwendyk: