Derek Boogaard

PHT Morning Skate: Rask an early Conn Smythe favorite; Should all goals be reviewable?

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Here’s the NBC Sports Stanley Cup playoff update for May 16

• Following the Blues’ loss in Game 3 after a missed hand pass call, Benjamin Hochman argues that all goals and the plays leading up to them should be reviewable. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

• The reaction from the Sharks and Blues to the call was naturally different. Joe Thornton took issue with an earlier decision not to call a delay of game penalty on David Perron in the second period. (CSN Bay Area)

Tuukka Rask is looking like a Conn Smythe favorite:

• Derek Boogaard’s mother is fighting to keep the memory of her son alive. Derek passed away eight years ago due to accidental overdose of alcohol and oxycodone. (The Hockey News)

• Charles Glenn, 64, has been singing the national anthems at St. Louis Blues’ games for 19 years, including nearly eight years since he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. It’s been getting increasingly difficult and he decided back in January that this would be his last season, but thanks to the Blues’ turnaround and postseason success, he’s got to extend his final run for longer than anticipated. (ESPN)

Brad Marchand seems to have succeeded in getting in Justin Williams‘ head. (CSN Boston)

• The Bruins’ fourth line played a major role in their Game 3 victory over the Carolina Hurricanes. (WEEI)

• After winning the No. 2 pick in the draft lottery, would it make sense for the Rangers to prioritize pursuing Erik Karlsson over Artemi Panarin, should both of them end up as unrestricted free agents? (Blue Seat Blogs)

• The Sharks are partnering with local tattoo shops to offer free Sharks tattoos during each Western Conference road game. (NBC Sports Bay Area)

• Although his playing days are long over, Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour is still dedicated to his own personal fitness to the point that Sebastian Aho thinks their bench boss can “outlift everyone in the whole league.” (USA Today)

• There are connecting threads between the underdog stories of the St. Louis Blues and Carolina Hurricanes. (Sports Illustrated)

• Islanders assistant Lane Lambert could end up as a head coach for the 2019-20 campaign. At a minimum, the Anaheim Ducks have offered him an interview. (Anaheim Calling)

• A look at 10 potential buyout candidates. (Sportsnet)

Andreas Johnsson isn’t one of the Maple Leafs’ bigger names, but he played a valuable role for the squad in 2018-19. (EP Rinkside)

• It seemed like Ralph Krueger might be done with the NHL in a coaching capacity, but talking with Sabres GM Jason Botterill and the talent on Buffalo’s roster convinced him to become their new head coach. (Buffalo News)

Ryan Dadoun is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @RyanDadoun.

PHT Morning Skate: Leo Komarov shows off piano skills

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Toronto Maple Leafs forward Leo Komarov is back in the NHL after spending last season with Dynamo in the KHL. Apparently he picked up some new off-ice skills while overseas. Komarov showed off his hands behind the piano this weekend. (via Petri Kontiola)

TSN hockey insider Bob McKenzie explains the origins of corsi in his new book Hockey Confidential. (TSN)

Bruins’ beat writer Amalie Benjamin explored the handedness inside the Boston locker room over the weekend and offered up an insightful piece. Despite selling more left handed sticks in Canada and Europe, they sell more right handed sticks in the US. According to an industry expert, the split is somewhere from 60-65 percent left handed around the world, and 60-65 percent right handed in the US. (The Boston Globe)

Vancouver Canucks goaltender Ryan Miller is paying a little more attention to the voices of his new teammates so not to have a repeat performance of what happened after he was dealt from the Buffalo Sabres to the St. Louis Blues last season. (The Vancouver Sun)

As the LA Kings look to repeat as Stanley Cup champions in 2014-14, their biggest offseason acquisition is someone you will see or hear very little from. (The Hockey News)

New York Times reporter John Branch chronicles the downfall of enforcer Derek Boogaard in his new book Boy on Ice: The Life and Death of Derek Boogaard due out this week. (The Globe and Mail)

Report: Derek Boogaard’s family sues NHLPA for $9.8 million

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Derek Boogaard’s sad saga has reportedly taken another turn.

TMZ reports Boogaard’s family has filed a lawsuit against the NHLPA for failing to help them recover the balance on his contract with the New York Rangers.

According to USA Today, the players’ union has a bit of a different take on things.

“We are saddened to read reports that the parents of the late Derek Boogaard have filed a lawsuit against the NHLPA,” the union said in a statement sent to The Associated Press. “We have not been served with or seen a copy of the complaint, but we are confident that there is no meritorious claim that can be made against the NHLPA in regard to Derek’s tragic death.”

The union said they won’t be commenting further on the case.

Boogaard died last May due to a mix of pain killers and alcohol. His parents believe trainers and doctors were negligent by continuing to feed his addiction to pills.

Derek Boogaard’s father discovers how bad his son’s drug issues were

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Derek Boogaard’s tragic death due to a drug overdose was one that shocked most fans. For his family, they demanded answers to find out how their son managed to run into so many problems with painkillers.

Derek’s father Len, a 30-year member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, as John Branch of the New York Times shares, found that his issues came from how easily he obtained drugs and how Boogaard’s long-term effects from prior abuse plagued him while in New York.

In a six-month stretch from October 2008 to April 2009, while playing 51 games, Boogaard received at least 25 prescriptions for the painkillers hydrocodone or oxycodone, a total of 622 pills, from 10 doctors — eight team doctors of the Wild, an oral surgeon in Minneapolis and a doctor for another NHL team.

Len Boogaard also notes that while with the Rangers, the team was told about Boogaard’s troubled past with narcotics but managed to prescribe hydrocodone for him to deal with pain stemming from dental work after getting re-injured in fights. Doctors also gave him numerous prescriptions for Ambien despite his addiction to sleeping pills in the past.

It’s an extensive and sad story to read and one that highlights how dangerous addiction can be, especially when it’s being enhanced by doctors trying to help someone get better.

PHT Morning Skate: Where the Kings want what the Lakers have

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

The Kings share a space with the NBA’s L.A. Lakers and they’re rather jealous of those championship banners and would like to add one of their own. (OC Register)

The Devils haven’t had to travel by plane for a playoff game since knocking out Florida. Advantage: Kings? (The Star-Ledger)

Tim Thomas’ teammates in Boston reacted rather reasonably to the news he’s taking a year off for his family, friends, and faith. (CSNNE.com)

Could the Senators be shopping Sergei Gonchar around this summer? (Ottawa Citizen)

The New York Times has a damning look at the ease in which Derek Boogaard had access to pain killers both before and after he entered the league’s substance abuse program. (New York Times)

Oilers assistant coach Ralph Krueger could sneak in as a candidate for the head coaching job. He’s apparently a very intense worker. (Edmonton Sun)

Nail Yakupov visited Edmonton recently and has his sights set on being the No. 1 pick in the draft. (Oilers)