Daniel Carcillo

PHT Morning Skate: Best 3-on-3 producers; should Avs pay Hall price?

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• An interesting look at the players who have been the the best at 3-on-3 overtime. [The Hockey News]

• Should the Avalanche pay what’s expected to be a hefty price to acquire Taylor Hall? [Mile High Hockey]

Andrei Svechnikov is showing that the dreaded “sophomore jinx” isn’t going to affect him. [NHL.com]

• “Ottawa Senators defenceman Nikita Zaitsev was not talking publicly Friday about allegations that he took his daughters from his ex-wife, Margo Gotovtseva, while in Russia last month.” [Ottawa Citizen]

• Penguins GM Jim Rutherford on Alex Galchenyuk‘s future as he struggles offensively: “The fact of the matter is, when we’re totally healthy he’s going to have to work very hard just to get in the top 12.” [TSN]

Anders Lee is finally coming around offensively for the Islanders. [Islanders Insight]

• “How To Improve The Lack Of Consistency In The NHL Department of Player Safety” [NoVa Caps Fans]

• Daniel Carcillo admits he was an abuser, a bully and worse, but the former NHLer has stories to tell and a past he wants to make amends for. [Toronto Star]

• The Blackhawks know what they are this season: inconsistent. [NBC Sports Chicago]

• Fun read on the man who many NHL superstars go to when they have equipment needs. [Sportsnet]

• “Mark Pavelich case is one of sadness and frustration” [LA Times]

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Marc Crawford on leave from Blackhawks following Sean Avery’s allegations

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The Chicago Blackhawks announced that assistant coach Marc Crawford “will be away from the team” while they investigate “recent allegations that have been made regarding his conduct with another organization.”

To cut through the legalese that’s becoming common as stories of abuse have surfaced (or resurfaced) over the past few weeks, the Blackhawks are referring to Sean Avery’s claims that Crawford kicked him during a Dec. 23, 2006 game stemming from their time with the Los Angeles Kings.

Avery’s details were pretty vivid to the New York Post’s Larry Brooks.

Avery explained that he messed up a drill during a practice, and his errant puck caught Crawford on the head, forcing Crawford to get stitches. Brooks asked Avery if Crawford then kicked Avery because of the mistake during the drill, but Avery said that it was because of a penalty:

“No, he kicked me after a too-many-men-on-the-ice call I took,” Avery said. “He didn’t have me serve it, we got scored on, and he let me have it.”

“You know how I stand at the end of the bench? He came down and gave me an ass kick that left a mark.”

If you’re familiar with Avery’s career as a profound pest, you’d probably not be too surprised that he believes that the rump-kicking wasn’t what got Avery traded out of town. Instead, Avery stated that he nearly got in a scuffle with an assistant named Mark Hardy.

(The candidness is really worth a read.)

Anyway, Avery’s claims surfaced from Brooks on Nov. 30, and the Blackhawks made this move on Monday (Dec. 2).

Here are the two tweets, again heavy on careful wording:

Allegations surfacing from around the NHL, and hockey world in general

To recap, reports of Mike Babcock asking Mitch Marner to put together a list of the Maple Leafs’ most and least hard-working young players inspired others to share their own experiences.

Akim Aliu spoke up about racist remarks made by Bill Peters about a decade ago, when the two were part of a Blackhawks affiliate team, the Rockford IceHogs. Following Aliu’s tweets, Michal Jordan also accused Peters of being physically abusive during their time with the Carolina Hurricanes (claims that were backed up by others, including Rod Brind’Amour). The Flames eventually parted ways with Peters after he offered a carefully worded statement, a statement that was criticized by many, Aliu included.

There’s been a back-and-forth between former Hurricanes owner Peter Karamanos and former Hurricanes GM Ron Francis stemming from how allegations of Peters’ abuse was handled.

Additional details regarding Babcock’s treatment of players have also come about, including troubling details about how Babcock allegedly treated Johan Franzen, both from Franzen and from Chris Chelios.

Former NHL player Daniel Carcillo has also gone into (sometimes graphic) detail about allegations of abuse in the hockey world.

Crawford, then, is another person in a position of power who is being accused of abusive behavior.

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Will this series of accusations (which isn’t comprehensive, and may just be the beginning) result in big changes for the culture around the sport, overall?

Some, such as The Athletic’s Eric Duhatschek, believe that this is the start of a “reckoning.” Others, including Jashvina Shah for The Globe & Mail, believe that hockey culture will never change.

Whatever the larger impact might or might not be, we know that Peters is out as Flames head coach, and Crawford is at least on temporary leave from the Blackhawks.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Pondering retirement indeed: Carcillo is ’98 percent ready to move on’

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Daniel Carcillo isn’t just considering retirement; it sounds like he’s strongly leaning in that direction.

During an appearance on CSN Chicago’s Kap & Haugh, Carcillo said he’s “about 98 percent ready to move on.”

“Thirty is a good age for me to get out and do some other things,” Carcillo said.

As noted in this post, Carcillo detailed his plan to help players post-retirement with “Chapter 5” in an interview with The Chicago Tribune.

He’s raising money for his not-for-profit organization, and it sounds like that is going well:

Carcillo has enjoyed some big wins at the NHL level with the Chicago Blackhawks and Los Angeles Kings, even if an increasingly reduced role meant zero playoff appearances in the Blackhawks’ 2015 postseason run (he did play in 39 regular season games, however).

Combine that declining role with Carcillo’s clear realization that the sport takes a huge toll on a person, and it’s understandable that he’s weighing his options. Perhaps he can do some good after those years of being an agitating presence on the ice?

Check out his emotional video for The Players’ Tribune, where he speaks from the heart about Steve Montador’s untimely death.

PHT Morning Skate: Reacting to Chicago’s championship

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Let’s lead with the highlights from Chciago’s Stanley Cup-winning 2-0 victory last night:

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is among those declaring the Blackhawks a dynasty. He’s also promising a “world class” celebration. (Associated Press)

Whether or not they’re a dynasty, what they’ve accomplished in spite of the salary cap is incredible. (Bleacher Report)

Pro athletes react to Chicago’s Stanley Cup championship. (The Players’ Tribune)

Blackhawks president and CEO John McDonough’s say they have fulfilled their ultimate goal:

After winning the Stanley Cup, Daniel Carcillo spoke about Steve Montador, whose “spirit is still with me.” (CSN Chicago)

Here’s a look at the jerseys worn by each championship team from 1918-2014. (Sports Logos)

Report: NHLPA working on ‘back to school’ program for players

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Just weeks after Blackhawks forward Daniel Carcillo openly questioned the NHLPA’s exit program, TSN reports the union is currently working on a “back to school” program, aimed at helping current players adjust to their post-hockey careers.

More:

TSN has learned that for the past two years, [NHLPA executive Mathieu] Schneider and his colleagues have been quietly researching professional sports leagues around the world, consulting with sports industry executives as far away as in New Zealand about programs that help active professional athletes improve levels of education and prepare for post-playing careers.

The personal development program will see players receive counseling about personal relationships and parenting, and be given the opportunity to shadow executives in industries such as finance.

The NHL and NHLPA have each pledged close to $1.5 million over the next three years to the pilot project, though it’s unclear how much of the collective $3 million will go to pay for tuition and other fees at colleges, universities and trade schools.

Per TSN, Schneider said he was aware of Carcillo’s exit program critiques and acknowledged they had merit. Carcillo’s remarks came shortly after the passing of friend and ex-Blackhawks teammate Steve Montador, who died in February at 35.

“So after Monty died, I really did some research, kind of asking guys that had already moved on and that I had played with if they knew what our exit program was for the NHLPA and I was kind of astonished to find out that not one guy can tell me what it was,” Carcillo said.

“Right now, as far as the PA goes, we would receive a phone call to see how we’re doing and that’s pretty much our exit program.”

Per TSN, the union hopes to launch its “back to school” program this fall, which aims to eventually include retired players as well.