Cory Conacher

PHT Decade in Review: Most significant trades in hockey

As 2019 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at the past decade. We’ll remember the best players and teams, most significant goals, and biggest transactions that have happened since 2010. Let us know your memories in the comments.

Best Hockey Trades

Seth Jones for Ryan Johansen

The Nashville Predators and Columbus Blue Jackets each had a glaring need and were able to help each other when Seth Jones and Ryan Johansen were traded for one another. From Columbus’ perspective, Johansen was not a favorite of coach John Tortorella and already had a lengthy contract dispute. Nashville had an abundance of talent on the blueline and needed to find a top line centerman. When a trade of this magnitude happens, one team usually regrets the move but, in this situation, both teams were left quite pleased.

Martin St. Louis for Ryan Callahan

It takes a lot of extenuating circumstances for two teams in the thick of a playoff race to trade their captains, but in 2014, the New York Rangers and Tampa Bay Lightning completed the transaction. Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman created a dispute with Martin St. Louis when he left the future Hall-Of-Famer off Team Canada’s original roster for the Sochi Olympics. In return, St. Louis requested a trade and the Lightning ended up honoring the request. On the other side, Glen Sather wrapped up contract extensions with Henrik Lundqvist and Dan Girardi but struggled to find common ground with Callahan. Even though the Lightning had very little leverage in the negotiations, Yzerman still found a way to pry two first-round picks from New York in the process. The Rangers went on to lose in the 2014 Cup Final and fell in the 2015 Conference Finals to the Lightning in a seven-game series. Neither team won a championship because of this move, but both clubs settled a problem with this transaction.

Mike Richards and Jeff Carter end up in Los Angeles, Flyers acquire Wayne Simmonds, Bradyen Schenn and Jakub Voracek

A few maneuvers were significant when Los Angeles won two Stanley Cups early in the decade, but the Kings paid a steep price to acquire Mike Richards in June 2011. Coincidentally, another big piece, Jeff Carter, was traded that day to the Columbus Blue Jackets. He was eventually sent to Los Angeles at the 2012 trade deadline where he became a key cog for the Kings. Anze Kopitar, Drew Doughty and Dustin Brown were already in place, but the acquisition of Richards and Carter were a huge reason why Los Angeles was very successful in the first half of the decade.

On the flip side, the Flyers were looking to change the culture around the club that offseason and landed Wayne Simmonds and Brayden Schenn in the Richards deal, while acquiring Jakub Voracek in the Carter trade. Philadelphia did not win a Stanley Cup, but they were not ripped off in either deal when trading legitimate NHL stars.

Flames send Dougie Hamilton to the Hurricanes in five-player trade

It was a blockbuster trade in June of 2018 that helped both the Carolina Hurricanes and Calgary Flames. Dougie Hamilton, Micheal Ferland and Adam Fox were sent to Carolina in exchange for Noah Hanifin and Elias Lindholm. If one was to define a hockey trade, this would be a great place to start.

One sided trades

Bruins ship Tyler Seguin to Dallas

There are always overreactions after losing in the Stanley Cup Playoffs but the way the Boston Bruins reacted to losing the 2013 Stanley Cup Final was clearly a mistake. The Bruins front office decided to trade Tyler Seguin, a star in the making, to the Dallas Stars for Loui Eriksson and several other pieces. The Bruins did not make matters worse by handing Eriksson a lucrative contract extension in the summer of 2016, but they did lose a player that averaged 77 points per season since the trade.

Capitals send Filip Forsberg to Nashville for Martin Erat

George McPhee is most likely still having nightmares about this transaction.

Ben Bishop for Cory Conacher

This deal is easy to judge knowing how each player performed since the trade. However, in April of 2013 the move did make some sense for both teams. The Ottawa Senators had a crowded crease with Craig Anderson, Robin Lehner and Bishop while Conacher was off to a strong start with the Tampa Bay Lightning, recording 24 points (nine goals, 15 assists) in the first 35 games of the season. The undersized forward instantly became the Senators’ leading scorer upon his arrival but would never become the lethal scorer Ottawa hoped for. On the other hand, Bishop has become a well-rounded NHL goaltender.

Griffin Reinhart to Edmonton

There probably could be a category for several of the moves Peter Chiarelli made but trading two premium draft picks for Griffin Reinhart is at the top of the list. It doesn’t help when one of those picks turned into Mathew Barzal, but the Oilers general manager hoped Reinhart would solve Edmonton’s defensive issues. Former Islanders general manager Garth Snow is probably still confused how he pulled this one off.

Taylor Hall for Adam Larsson

Hall helped the New Jersey Devils return to the Stanley Cup Playoffs and captured the 2018 Hart trophy, while Edmonton picked up a middle-pairing defenseman.

Mika Zibanejad for Derick Brassard

Why the Ottawa Senators were interested in trading a young center with Zibanejad’s potential is still a bit mind-boggling. The Swedish forward has turned into one of the more underrated centers in the NHL while Brassard has bounced around the NHL the past couple of seasons.

Brent Burns to the Sharks

The Minnesota Wild received Devin Setoguchi, Charlie Coyle and a first-round draft pick, but Burns has been one of the most dynamic defensemen in the entire NHL throughout the decade. There are very few assets that could have lived up to the value Burns has provided on the ice.

Franchise Altering Maneuvers

P.K. Subban for Shea Weber

For those who understand the salary cap recapture penalties, the Nashville Predators took a significant gamble when sending Shea Weber to the Montreal Canadiens for P.K. Subban. If Weber were to retire before his deal runs out, they will be forced to operate with a lot of dead money on their books.

Subban did help the Predators reach the Stanley Cup Final in 2017 but has since been shipped off to the New Jersey Devils.

Blues acquire Ryan O'Reilly

The 2019 Conn Smythe winner was an integral member of the St. Louis Blues’ Stanley Cup run last season. Doug Armstrong gave up a lot at the time including a top prospect, two premium picks and two roster players, but the Buffalo Sabres miscalculated in their evaluation. Without the the O’Reilly acquisition, the song ‘Gloria’ is probably not a huge hit in the St. Louis area.

Penguins acquire Phil Kessel

It wasn’t always a smooth ride in Pittsburgh, but Kessel averaged 75 points per season and played a major part in back-to-back Stanley Cup Championships.

TJ Oshie to the Capitals

The Washington Capitals have been one of the most successful teams over the last decade but didn’t get over the hump until the spring of 2018. T.J. Oshie was not the main piece during the championship run, but he has provided secondary scoring and strong two-way play since his acquisition in the summer of 2015.

MORE PHT DECADE IN REVIEW FUN:
• Top NHL players in fantasy hockey
• Most significant goals
• Best players of the decade
• Favorite goals, best/worst jerseys
Best NHL teams of the decade

Scott Charles is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @ScottMCharles.

Rask, Conacher come to blows; Vasilevskiy feels left out (video)

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It was Tuukka Time in Boston on Thursday, but Tuukka Rask wasn’t making a save on this particular play.

Instead, the Boston Bruins goalie was using his glove and blocker for far more sinister purposes than merely robbing opposing players of goals.

After Cory Conacher got too close to his personal space, Rask decided to throw a couple hands at Conacher in the second period. Rask’s engagement was over at that point, as Bruins players jumped into and all hell broke loose.

Let’s roll the tape.

At the end of the video, you can see Andrei Vasilevskiy being held back by a referee. He wanted a piece but was left wanting. Oh, how we miss the days of a good, ol’ fashioned goalie scrap. Credit to Vasilevskiy, though. He didn’t hesitate to make a B-line for the Bruins netminder.

[The 2018 NHL Stanley Cup playoffs begin April 11 on the networks of NBC]

Vasilevskiy was penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct after crossing the center line.

Conacher was handed a two-minute minor for goaltender interference and another two-minute minor for roughing on the play. Rask, who started the whole thing, was assessed a two-minute minor for roughing.

Rask was not assessed a match penalty for throw a punch with his blocker.

Tensions are high in this one, with first place in the Atlantic Division on the line.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

So, a Senators defenseman got hurt during a round of pregame soccer

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During an 82-game season, NHL players get hurt in all sorts of ways. It almost seems surprising that we don’t hear about them getting banged up during the traditional round of pre-game soccer more often, really.

It appears that was the case for Ottawa Senators defenseman Mark Borowiecki on Monday, as the team announced that he suffered a leg laceration during pregame activities while TSN’s Chris Cuthbert clarified that it was specifically soccer.

At least Borowiecki shouldn’t feel alone among Senators who’ve been injured in odd and semi-comical ways, as Craig Anderson memorably hurt himself cutting chicken.

Patrick Wiercioch gets the nod against the Ottawa Senators with Borowiecki out of the lineup.

(Note: the main image features former Senators forward Cory Conacher, in case you’re curious.)

Conacher clears waivers, off to Bridgeport

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Cory Conacher cleared waivers Saturday and has been loaded to the Bridgeport Sound Tigers the New York Islanders announced.

The 24-year-old’s play has dropped off considerably since he burst on to the scene with the Tampa Bay Lightning during the lockout-shortened 2012-13 season.

After a mid-season trade to the Ottawa Senators, Conacher finished his rookie season with 11 goals and 29 points in 47 games. He finished sixth in Calder Trophy voting that season.

However, Conacher mustered just seven goals and 26 points in 79 games last season split between the Senators and Buffalo Sabres.

He signed a one-year, $600,000 contract with the Islanders in the summer, but had just a goal and two assists in 15 games before New York placed him on waivers Friday.

Conacher last played in the AHL during the 2012-13 season with the Syracuse Crunch scoring 12 goals and 28 points in 36 games.

Isles waive Conacher

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After scoring just one goal in 15 games this year, Cory Conacher has been placed on waivers.

The Islanders made the announcement on Friday, a tough development in what started out as a promising campaign. Conacher actually started the season as a No. 1 winger on the John Tavares-Kyle Okposo line, but quickly fell out of favor and was a healthy scratch by early November.

It’ll be interesting to see if anyone takes a flier on Conacher via waivers. He burst onto the scene during the lockout-shortened ’13 campaign and finished sixth in Calder voting but, since then, failed to catch on in both Ottawa and Buffalo.

He signed a one-year, $600,000 deal with the Islanders in July.