Colton Parayko

Associated Press

PHT Stanley Cup Tracker: Cup heads to the Canadian prairies

The PHT Stanley Cup tracker will keep tabs on how the St. Louis Blues spend their summer celebrating.

We’re back once again and on the trail of the Stanley Cup, which is traveling around the world this summer in the hands of the St. Louis Blues.

According to the Blues, the Cup will travel nearly 29,000 miles across three continents and five countries over the next two months.

This week, the Cup was in Western Canada, visiting head coach Craig Berube’s’ quaint hometown in Alberta and in Regina, where Brayden Schenn and Co. took the mug to Mosaic Stadium, the home of the Canadian Football League’s Saskatchewan Roughriders.

The Cup made its way to Busch Stadium two weeks ago as several of the Blues players hoisted it in front of thousands of St. Louis Cardinals fans.

And here’s Conn Smythe winner Ryan O'Reilly throwing out the game’s first pitch.

Brayden Schenn got his day with the Cup in Saskatoon on Friday and took it right to the place where his father has worked for 28 years as a firefighter.

Schenn was seen wearing a firefighter helmet during the Blues’ parade with the Cup back in June.

“You always think if I win the Cup, you put the thoughts in your head of what I would do with it,” Schenn told the team’s website. “My dad is a firefighter, so this was important to me. I’m trying to do my best sharing it with a lot of people today.”

He also took it Royal University Hospital where he met with sick children, including 16-year-old John Bossaer.

The Cup then headed a few hours south, where Tyler Bozak and Jaden Schwartz shared their day with the Cup with the city of Regina on Saturday.

The duo planted a Blues flag on the Saskatchewan Legislative Building.

They then headed to where people where melons on their heads: Mosaic Stadium.

There, they paraded the trophy in front of thousands of Saskatchewan Roughriders fans who had assembled for the Canadian Football League’s game against the Calgary Stampeders. There wasn’t much to cheer for during the football game for fans — the Roughriders lost 37-10 — but Bozak and Schwartz, along with Schenn, got the crowd into a frenzy.

Earlier in the week, the Cup was a province over in Alberta.

Craig Berube, fresh off a three-year extension as bench boss with the Blues, took the Cup back to his hometown of Calahoo, Alta.

It’s not a big place — the thriving metropolis boasts a population of just 85 — but they were all out to congratulate Berube.

“We all grew up here,” Berube told the team’s website. “My dad and brothers lived on this farm or just down the road. We were grain farmers, cattle farmers, we had it all here, that’s how we grew up. It’s changed now, but still my dad lives here with his brothers and my uncle built a 9-hole golf course on the property over there.

“Every summer I come back once or twice, and when we play Edmonton I come back and visit if I have the chance. But this is the most special trip so far for me.”

His mother, meanwhile, was just as thrilled.

“I never dreamt it. Unreal,” said Ramona Berube, Craig’s mother. “I never thought of something like this (happening). It’s just great for everybody who was down at the arena to see it. You can see how much it means to everybody.”

Colton Parayko, meanwhile, got his day with the Cup in St. Alberta, a city northwest of Edmonton.

Parayko’s day also included an emotional moment as he, along with his grandfather and family, toasted his grandma, who died last November after a battle with cancer.

According to Parayko, a deal was made between grandmother and grandson that if the latter made the NHL one day, the former would take a shot of peach schnapps at her home in St. Albert any time he scored.

With her passing, the family honored the tradition on Wednesday.

“She was a special girl and she means a lot to me and my whole family,” Parayko said. “With me not being in St. Albert here and playing in St. Louis, the shots were a way we could frequently connect (during hockey season). In the summer when I came home, she begged me to score a few extra ones for her.”

“We had such a wonderful life together. I wish she was here to see this.”

Meanwhile, the mayor of Boston, Martin Walsh, made a nice gesture to Laila Anderson this week, congratulating her and the Blues for their Stanley Cup win.

“Dear Laila – We have never met, so let me begin by introducing myself. My name is Marty and I am a passionate, lifelong Boston Bruins fan,” Walsh wrote. “I am writing to you because a couple of weeks ago, I was at home, watching pre-game coverage of game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals, when I saw a story about you, your love of the St. Louis Blues, how the Blues players’ love you in return, and how you inspried an entire city and fan base. After watching the segment, I turned to my partner, Lorrie, and said, ‘This stinks! I love the Bruins and I want them to win! … But I really want Laila to win, too!’

“I don’t know if you or your family plan to come back to Boston anytime soon, but if you should return please let me know as I would be very glad to meet you and your family and show you some more of Boston. I certainly can’t promise you a cooler experience than standing on the Garden ice kissing the Stanley Cup, but Boston’s a great city and would love to have you back.”


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Blues fan Laila Anderson gets moment with Stanley Cup

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St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson has enjoyed quite a ride while inspiring her team to its first-ever Stanley Cup victory.

Despite Game 7 being in Boston, Anderson was there, and she didn’t just get to see the Blues win it all. She even got a moment with the Stanley Cup, and fittingly, her buddy Colton Parayko helped her give the Stanley Cup a kiss.

This completes quite the ride for the 11-year-old, who’s battling a rare disease called HLH. Anderson’s had a bobblehead made in her image, and even had the chance to pump the team and the crowd before Game 3 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final in St. Louis.

The NHL posted wonderful footage of the moment on Twitter:

While PHT’s own Sean Leahy was on the ice to capture the moment:

Even if your team didn’t win it all this season – even if you root for the Bruins – it’s hard not to feel happy for Laila Anderson. Really, moments like these are what it’s all about.

MORE FROM THE BLUES WINNING THE STANLEY CUP

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Stanley Cup Final: Blues make lineup change; Grzelcyk game-time decision

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It looks as if the St. Louis Blues and Boston Bruins will both be making some lineup changes for Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final Wednesday night (8 p.m. ET, NBC; Live Stream).

Let’s start with the significant news on the Boston side where the Bruins might have all of their top defenders in the lineup for the first time since the beginning of the series. After missing the past four games, Matt Grzelcyk has been cleared for action and is officially listed as a game-time decision. If he plays, and it seems extremely likely that he will, he would replace Connor Clifton.

Grzelcyk has been sidelined since early in Game 2 when he was on the receiving end of an illegal check from Oskar Sundqvist, resulting in a one-game suspension for the Blues’ forward.

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

It remains to be seen how much of an impact he can make since he hasn’t taken any contact since the injury, but the Bruins have definitely missed his ability to move the puck.

“I think your adrenaline will carry you through,” said Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy on Wednesday.

“The one thing about Matt if he does go in after missing some games is he’s been skating with us. It’s not like he just jumped on the ice yesterday. He’s been participating, albeit non-contact, so there is a little bit of a different animal there. At this time of the year you’re not into a lot of contact in practice anyway so he’s just going to have to understand, because he did obviously live the first whatever it was, game and a half with St. Louis, he knows they are physical. He’s been there. He’s been watching. He knows he’s gotta get back in a hurry, make good decisions with it, take a hit to make a play if that’s what is required, which it usually is against this team. That’s the challenge in front of him. We’ve had discussions with him about it and he’ll be ready for it.”

Two of the three Bruins’ losses in this series came in games where they were forced to finish with five defenders due to injury with Grzelcyk exiting Game 2 and Zdeno Chara being forced to miss most of Game 4 after being hit in the face with a puck. While Chara has not missed any further game action, Grzelcyk’s absence has been significant.

“If he’s able to come back and help us tonight, he’s an incredible puck mover,” said Bruins defender Charlie McAvoy. “He’s just kind of had that fire in his eye for the playoffs. He’s been playing awesome for us, and we’ve missed him terribly since he’s been out. He just gives us that extra jolt when it comes to breaking out. He’s a gifted puck-mover. If he’s back to night, I think he’ll do his job and help us out even more.”

On the St. Louis side, forward Ivan Barbashev will be returning to the lineup after missing Game 6 due to a suspension for an illegal check to the head.

He will replace rookie forward Robert Thomas on the team’s fourth line next to Alex Steen and Sundqvist.

That is not the only change the Blues will be making.

Coach Craig Berube also said that Joel Edmundson will be drawing back into the lineup in place of Robert Bortuzzo.

Why the change? With Alex Pietrangelo and Colton Parayko playing so many minutes on the right side Berube wants to go with four left-handed defenders in his lineup.

“With Parayko and Pietrangelo on the right side, they’re just eating so many minutes up; there’s not a lot of minutes over there,” said Berube. “So, we decided to go with the four lefties, and what he can bring, he can bring a lot. I mean, he’s got some real good upside, shoots the puck well, big guy, big body, physical player, but he does do some things well in the offensive zone, so I like his shot.”

Edmundson played sparingly over the first four games of the series, recording zero points and finishing as a minus-3 in his limited minutes. Bortuzzo scored a goal for the Blues in Game 2 of the series in Boston and also scored a game-winning goal in the Western Conference Final series against the San Jose Sharks.

Edmundson will skate on the Blues’ third defense pairing alongside Vince Dunn.

“I played in I think three Game 7s now so this is going to be my fourth. None of them compare to this one,” said Edmundson. “Obviously it’s going to be the biggest game of my life. But everyone’s excited.”

Edmundson said his first reaction upon finding out that he would be in the lineup was to text his parents, who were already planning on attending the game. One member of his family not attending the game? His brother, Jesse, who has apparently been bad luck throughout the series.

“They were coming,” said Edmundson when talking about his parent’s plans. “My brother (Jesse) stayed back because he thinks he’s bad luck. He’s been bad luck throughout the series, so he stayed back, he’s taking one for the team.”

Whatever it takes.

More Blues-Bruins Game 7
• Blues vs. Bruins: Three keys for Game 7
• The Wraparound: It is all on line for Blues-Bruins 
• Which Blues, Bruins player will get Stanley Cup handoff?
• Conn Smythe watch
• Stanley Cup roundtable discussion

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Blues defense benefiting from HOFer Larry Robinson’s experience

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BOSTON — It never helps to have a little experience helping guide you through new situations. For the St. Louis Blues defensemen, none of them had ever played in a Stanley Cup Final before this postseason. So as the team’s blue liners got a taste of the rough and tumble fourth and final round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs, they knew they could rely on one specific person who owns plenty of experience in that situation.

When Craig Berube took over from Mike Yeo in November, Larry Robinson moved from senior consultant to hockey operations to assistant coach.  A nine-time Stanley Cup winner as a player and coach, his addition to Berube’s staff brought plenty of knowledge to the job. 

“To have a guy like that with that experience around, you can’t beat it. He’s an unbelievable man,” said Berube.

It was a position, however, that Robinson only took on until Christmas as he cited the travel being too much for his 68-year-old body. As the season has progressed, especially now in the postseason, the Hall of Famer has been with them through their journey.

A 10-time All-Star, two-time Norris Trophy winner, and Conn Smythe winner, Robinson is a resource for any of the Blues’ defensemen to use for advice. He’s seen it all and any bit of information he can pass on that will assist, he will.

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

“He’s been great for me. It’s just another sounding board,” said Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo. “When you’ve got nine Stanley Cups you’ve got a lot of information to provide. He’s fun to have around. If you’ve ever had a conversation with him, his demeanor and personality fit great with our group. I know for us, on the back end especially, he’s been fantastic for us.”

Now an eye in the sky during the playoffs, Robinson communicates things he sees from up top between periods. But it’s the defensemen who as a group have benefited most. With five players at least 6-foot-3 and Robinson listed at 6-foot-4, he knows the ins and outs of playing the position as a bigger player.

“It’s an advantage for us when we’re out there,” said 6-foot-4 Colton Parayko on working Robinson to improve his stick work. “It helps us where we can control the forward a little bit, which is important for us.”

Ask any of the defensemen and they’ll tell you that the way Robinson delivers his messages is in a clear manner and that the players aren’t overloaded with too much information. He knows just how to get his point through when he sees something that needs to be addressed.

Vince Dunn is the youngest and shortest defensemen on the Blues at 22 years old and 6-feet tall. This is his first postseason, and it’s been an eventful one. Having Robinson around and his years of experience behind the bench and on the ice has been very beneficial.

“He’s been amazing to have as a mentor,” Dunn said. “He knows there’s a lot going on with coaching and just learning from the other guys, too, who are on the team. He doesn’t try to push you too much but he’s definitely there for someone to talk to. He has a lot of very smart things to say that maybe you don’t really think about and other guys don’t think about because he’s been around for so long.”

Knowing they have such an asset at hand, the Blues players don’t hesitate to reach out to Robinson with any questions, or inquire about a good story from his 20-year NHL career. Robinson will also approach them if he sees something that he’s noticed in their games. 

Every conversation has had a benefit for the defensemen.

“I think more than anything he wants you to feel confident about yourself and put yourself in good areas, just make the game easier on yourself,” said Dunn. “He doesn’t try to teach you how to shoot all over again or skate all over again, it’s little things that you don’t really think about out there. Those things make a huge difference when you’re on the ice.”

Game 5 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final airs Thursday on NBC at 8 p.m. ET (stream here).

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Laila Anderson bobblehead created to benefit St. Louis Hospital

St. Louis Blues fan Laila Anderson has become such an inspiration to the team, fans, and hockey world in general, that she now has her very own bobblehead. This continues what has to have been quite the few weeks for the 11-year-old, who was on hand to pump up the Blues during Game 3 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final.

The National Bobblehead Museum has put an Anderson bobblehead on pre-sale, with a goal of shipping the figurines by October of 2019. The website notes that $5 from every bobblehead sold (they’re going for $25, plus shipping) will be donated to the St. Louis Children’s Hospital, where Anderson is receiving treatment for  HLH, a rare, life-threatening condition that attacks the immune system.

“I’m really excited to be having my own bobblehead, especially since they support such a great cause!” Anderson said, via The National Bobblehead Museum’s press release. “Thank you to the St. Louis Blues and to hockey fans everywhere for all the love and support.”

Here’s a look at the bobblehead in GIF form, because you have to see that bobbling, right?

The National Bobblehead Museum explains some of the elements of the bobblehead, including the bell:

The bobblehead features Laila on a hockey-rink base with her signature jean jacket holding a replica of the sign that she held up during a recent playoff game as well as the bell that children at the Children’s Hospital ring when they finish their chemotherapy treatment.

For more on Anderson’s experiences, including her friendship with Blues defenseman Colton Parayko, check out the videos above and below.

Game 5 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final airs on NBC at 8 p.m. ET on Thursday (stream here).

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.