Collective Bargaining Agreement

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PHT Morning Skate: Kane strips; Pettersson faster, stronger

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• NHLPA weighing risks of poking the bear. (TSN.ca)

• NHL expands reach into Russia with new streaming deal. (The Canadian Press)

Evander Kane strips down, opens up about race for ESPN The Magazine’s BODY Issue. (The Undefeated)

• Maple Leafs’ Andersen ready to embrace load management once 2019-20 gets underway. (Toronto Sun)

• Laine, Connor could miss camp, but Jets claim it won’t be a distraction. (NHL.com)

• Morrissey would love to play his whole career with Jets. (Winnipeg Sun)

• Pettersson feeling quicker, stronger after summer of conditioning. (Sportsnet)

• New quarterback can help Oilers power play be magic, as opposed to tragic. (Edmonton Journal)

• Top NHL teams seek size after playoff failures. (Yahoo Sports)

• The Devils were one of the unluckiest teams in the NHL last season. (All About the Jersey)

• Sportsnet can’t dig out of hole created by NHL contract. (Troy Media)

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

NHL, NHLPA agree to no World Cup in 2020

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The World Cup of Hockey will not happen in 2020, but that doesn’t mean the popular tournament is dead in the water.

That is the message from both the National Hockey League and the National Hockey League Players’ Association late Wednesday.

Both entities released statements stating each party’s agreement that a World Cup of Hockey in 2020 would be unrealistic to schedule.

“The players are focused on finding the proper time to schedule the World Cup of Hockey within the context of an overall international hockey calendar,” a statement from the NHLPA read. “While we and the league have discussed the possibility of holding the next World Cup in September 2020, we jointly concluded that it is unrealistic to expect that preparations for the vent would be completed in that time.”

The NHL’s statement said that both parties held constructive meetings in Toronto on Wednesday.

The NHL’s statement echoed that of the NHLPA and say both parties “plan to continue their dialogue with the hope of being able to schedules the next World Cup event as part of a broader agreement, which would include a long-term international event calendar.”

[Related: NHL and NHLPA meet to discuss CBA, World Cup of Hockey]

Looming large over all of this is the current collective bargaining agreement, which is in place until 2022 unless one side elects to terminate it. That early window to opt out of the current arrangement opens on Sept. 1, 2019, for the NHL and Sept. 15, 2019, for the NHLPA.

The thought is that, if the World Cup in 2020 had gone forward, it would have signified some semblance of peace between the NHL and the NHLPA in terms of labor talks. The fear here, then, is that both sides aren’t close enough to an agreement.

The flip side is that the World Cup is a massive event that would take much planning and coordinating to get sorted in a year-and-a-half.

For now, it seems like both sides are looking in the same direction, together. That’s a positive sign as no one wants lost hockey in any form. Delaying the World Cup is worth it if harmony (and a new CBA) sans a work stoppage is the end result.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Columnist: Gap between cap and floor to grow wider

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A little something to chew on during a slow news day – the Globe and Mail’s Eric Duhatschek believes the gap between the salary cap and salary floor will be wider once the NHL and the players’ union negotiate a new collective-bargaining agreement. (The current CBA expires in September.)

Here’s Duhatschek’s explanation:

Coming out of the lockout, teams were limited to a $39-million payroll, but were required to spend a minimum of $23-million. Because the business has prospered since then, the ceiling is now $64.3-million and the floor $48.3-million – and the latter is an unsustainable figure for small-market U.S. teams.

…There will probably be a floor in the new CBA as well, but the gap will be wider than $16-million, just so the Nashvilles, Phoenixes and St. Louises can set their budgets and spend to their limits. The gaps between the haves and have-nots will widen financially, although how that actually plays out on the ice remains to be seen.

For fans of cost-conscious clubs like Nashville or Carolina, there are two ways to look at this.

From a pessimistic view, the Leafs, Flyers, Rangers and the rest of the rich franchises will be able to outspend your team to an even greater degree.

On the other hand, if the cap floor is too high and your team is forced to spend money it can’t afford to spend, there’s always the risk your team calls it a day and moves somewhere else.

What the NHL and NHLPA might discuss next summer once current CBA expires

This has not been an easy summer for the NHL by any means. Perhaps the post-Game 7 Vancouver riots acted as an ominous introduction for months in which most of the biggest stories were negative. From more manageable headaches like Drew Doughty’s contract holdout situation to stomach-churning issues such as Sidney Crosby’s battle with post-concussion syndrome and the troubling series of enforcer deaths, the notion that next season cannot come soon enough takes on added meaning in 2011.

Yet as bad as things have been lately, next summer could be foreboding in its own right for a reason few of us even want to consider: the possibility of another lockout. The league seems like it’s in much, much better shape heading into the summer of 2012 than it did going into the summer of 2004, but the fear is there since the Collective Bargaining Agreement will expire.

The good news is that the NHL isn’t likely to shoot for enormous changes like instituting a salary cap or attempting to radically improve the style of play (among other alterations that the damaging 2004-05 lockout gave way to). That doesn’t mean that the league and its players association won’t be locked in some tough battles, though.

Tony Gallagher took a look at some of the hot button issues that will likely be discussed next summer as the parties try to hash out another CBA. It’s a piece worth reading from top to bottom, but PHT will take a look at some of the most interesting bits.

Let’s start things off on two issues that might have an impact on the league’s poorest teams.

In speaking to a number of informed people around the league on both sides of the fence, it’s clear that one of the league’s biggest problems within the present agreement is the obligation to enforce a floor on the genuinely pathetic franchises around the league.

The teams that have been losing money and crying wolf for the past 10 years are now being forced to pay out in the neighbourhood of US$45 million, which is forcing them into a position of losing money in some cases, and the league will be looking toward either lowering the floor or eliminating it altogether. That is something the players will likely vigorously defend.

(snip)

The Torontos, Montreals and Vancouvers keep handing over money to the same dud franchises year after year with the question being whether that will continue to be the case, and if so, will that pool of money increase or decrease? And how will it be comprised going forward.

A particularly wrangling issue is all playoff teams having to contribute one-third of all revenue sharing from their first-round take, a system that actually rewards franchises (most notably Toronto) for missing the playoffs.

That’s the interesting thing about the current CBA; there are provisions that both hurt and help the league’s less successful teams. (Then again, the high cap floor/playoff revenue sharing combo might have the worst impact on not-so-deep-pocketed clubs like the Nashville Predators, who use their guile more often than big pay checks to make the playoffs.) To make things fair, the league probably wouldn’t want to eliminate the salary cap floor without keeping a minimum payroll for teams who want to benefit from shared revenue.

Naturally, the big money questions will be the biggest sticking points. The other major money matter is guaranteed contracts (and owners’ urges to do away with them). Considering the dangers involved in the sport, it would be a hard sell to roll back guarantees. After all, who’s going to want to risk breaking a bone by blocking a shot if they could lose their job shortly afterward?

Gallagher’s most interesting point comes late in the article, where he claims that NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA head Donald Fehr have already won some big labor battles in their day, so they might be more willing to avoid a big standoff. It would be great if that ends up being true, but we’ll need to wait and see if that bit of sunshine turns out to be the light at the end of a (hopefully short) negotiating tunnel or just an example of an incorrect but educated guess.

Click here to read more about the probable talking points during the 2012 CBA meetings.

Nervous about potential NHL labor strife next year? Daniel Paille isn’t

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While we may (or may not) be paying attention to how the NBA is locked out without any progress, we’re reminded about the NHL’s troubles back in 2004-2005 when the owners locked out the players themselves. That lockout was devastating to the NHL in that it canceled an entire season and saw the Stanley Cup not handed out.

With memories like that and the NHL’s Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NHLPA expiring after this season, some are already getting nervous about how things will go this year and over the summer. After all, those wounds for NHL fans run deep and are all too fresh in our minds. Seeing the NBA go through what the NHL did just six years ago gives us reason to pause and hope there won’t be a repeat of that disaster.

One guy who isn’t worried about things is Boston Bruins players representative Daniel Paille. Paille might be new to the leadership position, but he says that the players remember what went down before and see how the NBA struggles are affecting their league and how they can’t follow the same path.

“We’re one year away, so we’re in the same position where we’re going to have to make a decision, but I feel confident [of avoiding another lockout],” Paille added.

Paille believes both the players and owners understand that the league can’t afford to have another stoppage after working so hard over the last six years to overcome the damage of the last lockout. Still, negotiations are likely to be contentious as player salaries have continued to rise despite the implementation of a hard salary cap.

“I think both sides know what’s at stake,” Paille said. “I think just having two lockouts in a row, especially one after the other, is not healthful on either side. I think hopefully both sides realize what’s at stake and realize that we want to build the fans base and the way to do that is to keep playing.”

Continuing to play hockey would be a really smart idea. After all, the NHL is in a position to perhaps gain a few more fans with the NBA figuring their business out. They’d also be wise to not further infuriate fans who came back after the 2004-2005 lockout again. There’s a cliché that fits well for this situation: “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.” A lockout after the 1994 season managed to kill off part of the 1994-1995 season while the 2004-2005 season was wiped out entirely.

The one line from this that Paille and NHL commissioner Gary Bettman share when it comes to this topic is about how potential problems are a year away. We understand that their minds are focused more for what’s directly ahead for them and the upcoming season, however they have to understand where the fans’ minds are at. Fans don’t want to see a work stoppage again and with former MLBPA head Donald Fehr in charge of the NHLPA, everyone’s more than a bit nervous. After all, Fehr was in charge of the MLBPA when they canceled the World Series in 1994.

We’re not advocating giving fans lip service, but we hope that they’ll understand why fans will get grumpy if there’s no progress on matters as the season wears on and potentially into the summer. Players and executives certainly don’t want to be talking big business when there’s games to be played, but let’s hope that lessons learned are still fresh in their mind.