Cam Talbot

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Cam Talbot could be Flames’ X-factor

Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to identifying X-factors to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Calgary Flames.

If the Calgary Flames are going to repeat their 2018-19 regular season success and take another step toward becoming a Stanley Cup team they are going to need a better goaltending performance than the one they received a year ago.

The duo of David Rittich and Cam Talbot is one of the biggest — maybe the biggest — questions facing the team this season.

Talbot is the intriguing one here because his move to Calgary presents an opportunity for him to potentially jumpstart his career.

While his time with the Edmonton Oilers ended poorly, his first two years were extremely productive. He gave the Oilers above average goaltending, he was durable and played a ton of minutes, and was so good during the 2016-17 season that he finished in fifth in the Vezina Trophy voting. Given the number of minutes he played and the production he provided he was easily the second most valuable player on the team after Connor McDavid.

[MORE: 2018-19 in review | Under Pressure: Treliving | 3 questions]

After that, everything kind of fell apart for him.

The Oilers never gave him a capable backup that could ease his workload and ran him into the ground as a result, and they did so while making him play behind one of the most porous and lackluster defensive teams in the NHL. The results were disastrous over the past two seasons, and especially so during the 2018-19 season.

Was it a result of the workload? Certainly possible. Between 2015-16 and 2017-18 no goalie in the NHL appeared in more games, played more minutes, or faced more shots than Talbot did for the Oilers. He not only paced the league in all of those categories, he was significantly ahead of the next closest goalie in each category, playing 200 more minutes than any other goalie and facing nearly 200 more shots. During those three yeas he faced more than 5,800 shots on goal. New York’s Henrik Lundqvist is the only one that faced more than 5,400.

He played 11,247 minutes. Only two other goalies (Devan Dubnyk and Martin Jones) played more than 11,000. There only four others that played more than 10,000 minutes.

As if the workload wasn’t enough, he wasn’t exactly playing easy minutes, either, serving as the last line of defense for a team that was awful defensively.

By joining the Flames he is going to the complete opposite situation.

With Rittich in place on a two-year contract Talbot will not be required to carry the bulk of the workload as there is the potential for a platoon situation to be put in place.

He is also going from a team that was 19th in the NHL in shots against the past two seasons to a team that was fifth and also boasts the reigning Norris Trophy winner. It is a much better set of circumstances.

Talbot has shown the ability to be a capable starting goalie in the NHL. Going from one of the most dysfunctional franchises in the league to a Stanley Cup contender could be just what he needs to get back on track and return to that level. If it happens for him, it is going to have positive results for the Flames as well.

MORE:
ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Goaltending, Lucic’s role among biggest questions facing Flames

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to identifying X-factors to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Calgary Flames.

Let’s take a look at three big questions for the Calgary Flames for the 2019-20 season.

1. Who is going to stop the puck?

There is probably no question that will impact the Flames more than this one.

Goaltending has been a constant struggle for nearly a decade now as the team has not finished higher than 15th in save percentage since the 2011-12 season, and hasn’t finished higher than 20th since the 2013-14 season. That is simply not championship caliber goaltending, and it was probably the single biggest weakness the team had this past season.

David Rittich was a nice surprise, but he struggled down the stretch and is still a bit of an unknown entering this season. Challenging him for playing time will be Cam Talbot who was brought in on a one-year deal to replace Mike Smith.

The Flames have elite, high-end forwards and a strong defense that is carried by Norris Trophy winning blue-liner Mark Giordano.

That core at forward and defense is good enough to compete for a championship right now and maybe even win one if everything goes right. Goaltending, however, is going to be the biggest “make-or-break” aspect of this team and if things do not dramatically improve in net it is going to be an impossible obstacle to overcome.

[MORE: 2018-19 in review | Under Pressure: Treliving | Talbot the X-Factor]

2. What can they get out of Milan Lucic?

James Neal‘s brief tenure with the Flames did not go as anyone could have planned it, so it is not really a surprise they were willing to part ways with a 32-year-old winger coming off of a down year.

What is a surprise is that they traded him for Milan Lucic, a player that is regarded to have one of the worst contracts in hockey.

How badly has Lucic’s career deteriorated in recent years? He scored just 16 goals over the past two years and has looked like a player that is simply not built for the modern day, faster paced NHL.

If the Flames think they can rejuvenate his career or that his size and physical presence is going to dramatically alter the success they are likely setting themselves up for disappointment. They didn’t get upset in the first round by the Colorado Avalanche because they weren’t big enough or physical enough — they lost because they were outplayed by a faster team that is quickly emerging as a powerhouse in the Western Conference. Giving Lucic a significant role and assigning him to be the muscle to “protect” their stars as a deterrent is only going to hold them back.

If they play him in the bottom-six role he should be in they are committing $6 million in salary cap space to a player that isn’t going to give them that sort of a return on their investment.

Maybe they had to trade Neal, but trading him for a worse player with a worse (and buyout proof!) contract doesn’t seem to move the needle much in the right direction.

3. Will Johnny Gaudreau‘s playoff luck finally change?

Gaudreau has blossomed into a superstar for the Flames and is one of the league’s most dynamic offensive game-changers. He is the definition of an impact player and one that can take over a game on any given night, and he has consistently done that for the better part of the past three seasons.

The problem: It has not yet happened for him in the playoffs.

In his past two playoff appearances Gaudreau has scored zero goals in nine games while managing just three assists. Not great for a player that has been one of the best point producers in the league.

It’s easy (and lazy) to write that off as him “not being a playoff player” or being “too small.”  It is most likely a lot of bad luck. It is not as if Gaudreau has lacked chances in those playoff games. He still generated shots and he still created chances — he just hasn’t had the puck go in the net. That is not an uncommon development for any player. Pick out any superstar in the league and look at their postseason careers and you will find extended stretches over multiple postseasons where they did not consistently score goals.  Gaudreau is too good, too talented, and too productive to be shut down in the playoffs.

MORE:
ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

PHT Morning Skate: Triple-A ball club to wear Sabres inspired jerseys; Talbot comeback?

WKBW Buffalo

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• What’s up with Ivan Provorov’s contract negotiations? (Broad Street Hockey)

• Is Cam Talbot set for a bounceback season? (TSN.ca)

Keith Kinkaid’s arrival should help Canadiens manage Carey Price’s load. (Sportsnet)

• Montreal’s front office made quite a few moves this off-season, but will they pay off? (Eyes on the Prize)

• The Top 10 reasons an NHL team should trade for Milan Lucic. (Edmonton Journal)

• After adding Kessel & Soderberg, Coyotes should secure a playoff berth. (Featurd)

• A little roster juggling could do the Winnipeg Jets a lot of good next season. (Winnipeg Sun)

• Islanders add Varlamov as they try to build off an impressive season. (NHL.com)

• Buffalo Bisons baseball team to wear Sabres’ royal blue and gold for ‘Hockey Night at the Ballpark’ (WKBW Buffalo)

• Six young players who need a change of scenery. (The Hockey News)

• For all their efforts, did the Minnesota Wild gain anything from all the shuffling? (StarTribune)

• Most offer sheets get matched. Now what? (Sin.Bin Vegas)

• Hockey cards that need to be made. (Puck Junk)

• A look back, two years on, at the Mikhail Sergachev-Jonathan Druin trade. (Raw Charge)

• Chris Kelly is back with the Bruins in as a player development coordinator. (Boston Bruins)

• Former Predators captain Greg Johnson’s sucide should spark change. (Predlines)

• Blues anthem singer Charles Glenn ready for his encore. (Ladue News)

• How should the Vancouver Canucks utilize Thatcher Demko next season? (The Canuck Way)


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Flames’ Talbot ready to put last season behind him

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Cam Talbot says last year was an outlier in his career and that he’s looking forward to having a stout defense in front of him this season in Calgary.

All it took was a few-hour drive down the road (and a one-year contract worth $2.75 million), away from the Edmonton Oilers and a season where he only started 29 games (winning just 10 of them) and had a career-worst .893 save percentage. It’s a far cry from the 42 wins he put up in 73 starts two seasons prior. Then, the Oilers, as a whole, were a good team. This past season they were anything but.

Talbot lost his starting job to Mikko Koskinen and the Oilers gave the Finn a big money deal based on not a whole lot. As such, Talbot was traded at the deadline to the Philadelphia Flyers. Behind Carter Hart, Talbot barely played and was just as ineffective when he did.

“Last year was an outlier in my career,” Talbot said on Saturday after being introduced to the media. “Just take everything in stride. Any time you have a season like that, it puts things in perspective. Things aren’t always going to go your way. It’s how you can battle back and make yourself better in the long-run.”

Talbot said he has to come in refreshed and let last year slide.

“Have a short-term memory,” he said. “I think it’s easier said than done sometimes. I just want to come in here and prove that I still have a lot of hockey left in me.”

He’ll get to do so under Bill Peters, who coached Talbot at the World Hockey Championships. Talbot said he feels comfortable in the system, one that is defense-first and includes the reigning Norris winner in Mark Giordano.

“It’s exciting for myself,” Talbot said. “It’s a very deep team.”

[ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker]

David Rittich is the started in Calgary, but he split time with the outgoing Mike Smith (ironically, he’s gone to Edmonton) last season and Smith took the crease for the playoffs. Still, Talbot realizes he’s 1(b), if not the backup heading into next season.

“He’s a good, young goaltender… took his game to another level last year, had a heck of a season,” Talbot said. “I’m just coming in here trying to compete and pushing each other to be better.”

Flames general manager Brad Treliving said the expectations for Talbot are rather simple.

“Come in an stop the puck,” he said.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck.

Smith signs in Edmonton, Talbot head to Calgary

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Mike Smith is moving north this summer.

TSN’s Frank Seravalli reported Sunday that the unrestricted free agent goalie will sign with the Edmonton Oilers when the free agency window opens on Monday, a deal that was made official by the club during the first few hours of free agency. Smith joins the Calgary Flames’ bitter rivals, a team he held the crease for the past two seasons.

Smith is coming off a particularly poor season with a .898 save percentage after splitting time with David Rittich, who is now the favored netminder in the Flames organization despite Smith getting the crease in a disappointing first-round playoff exit.

[ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker]

Seravalli also reported that Cam Talbot is heading the other way and will join the Flames Monday, a move the Oilers confirmed. While Talbot finished last season with the Philadelphia Flyers after getting shipped there at the trade deadline, he spent most of the past four seasons with the Oilers.

It would seem that both Alberta teams are now out of the running for any of those signatures, although they may never have been in the race regardless. Not everyone wants to play in Edmonton and unless they want to be a part of a tandem in Calgary, there are better starting options elsewhere, and likely money, too.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck.