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Marchand imitates Sissons’ reaction after high-sticking penalty (Video)

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Who knew Brad Marchand could act?

After Saturday night’s performance in the first period against the Nashville Predators, the Boston Bruins star might be getting a call from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Known for slick goals, questionable hits and even a lick or two every now and then, Marchand pulled another rabbit out of the hat after taking a high-sticking call against Predators forward Colton Sissons.

Marchand was hardly pleased after what appeared to be a phantom call and as he was getting ushered off the ice, decided to do his best Sissons impression.

Three times.

It was pretty funny.

Marchand’s best Hollywood moves netted him a 10-minute misconduct and a two-minute unsportsmanlike misconduct penalty on top of the two-minute call for getting his stick up a little too high.

And the Oscar goes too…

His thank-you speech should be interesting.

MORE: Your 2018-19 NHL on NBC TV schedule


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Lightning bounce Bruins from playoffs in five games

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The Tampa Bay Lightning will play for a spot in the Stanley Cup Final.

The Lightning earned a 3-1 decision in Game 5 on Sunday afternoon against the Boston Bruins, sending the Bruins into hibernation mode after taking the series 4-1.

The series will be largely defined by what the line of Brayden Point, Ondrej Palat and Tyler Johnson were able to accomplish after Tampa’s top line of Steven Stamkos, Nikita Kucherov and J.T. Miller took a back seat.

Point scored his third goal of the series to erase David Krejci‘s first-period tally, slotting home after making a patient play around Tuukka Rask.

Point, who finished with seven points in the series, helped the Lightning rebound from their 6-2 Game 1 defeat with a four-point night, a performance that one could argue was a turning point in the series. The Lightning cruised from there, allowing eight goals during their four-game winning streak.

Point’s time-on-ice jumped by over two minutes from Game 1 to Game 5, and it was well-deserved.

Contributions from Tampa’s top line weren’t as relevant as they were against the New Jersey Devils. Kucherov had 10 points in that series but just two points in the second round. Stamkos had a pivotal goal in Game 4 to force overtime, but had only an empty-netter otherwise.

Miller made his presence felt in Game 5, first by knocking David Backes out of the game with a crushing hit in the second period, and then minutes later, offering up the go-ahead goal that stood as the game-winner.

Boston, meanwhile, couldn’t find much in the way of scoring outside of Game 1.

Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and David Pastrnak combined four just four goals over the final four games of the series and secondary scoring from the Bruins was virtually non-existent, ultimately spelling the end to Boston’s season.

The Lightning now waits for the winner between the Washington Capitals and the Pittsburgh Penguins. Washington leads the series 3-2 after a 6-3 win on Saturday.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Girardi, Lightning push Bruins to brink of elimination

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The Tampa Bay Lightning have one foot in the Eastern Conference Final.

Dan Girardi scored 3:18 into overtime to give Tampa a 3-1 series lead after taking their second straight at TD Garden.

Girardi’s goal capped off a third-period comeback with his winner. Steven Stamkos scored his first goal at even strength in 21 games to erase the Bruins’ 3-2 lead.

There was some controversey on Stamkos’ goal as it appeared Nikita Kucherov tripped up Charlie McAvoy prior to the Stamkos one-timer that tied the game 3-3.

Brad Marchand, who wasn’t without his own controversy on the night after throwing a low hit on Ryan Callahan before licking him in a scuffled after, wasn’t none too pleased with the non-call.

The Bruins’ top line got their band back together in the game, but not before Tampa took a two-goal lead in the first 10 minutes of the first period.

The Bruins found themselves trailing early and spending time killing off penalties as Brayden Point and Kucherov put the visitors head. Kucherov’s goal was his first of the series.

Patrice Bergeron‘s line with David Pastrnak and Marchand took over from there, regaining the mojo that had worked so well for them in Game 1 — their only win of the series thus far.

Pastrnak pulled the Bruins one back in the first and Bergeron netted the next two as the Bruins took their first lead in the third period.

The series shifts back to Tampa for Game 5 on Sunday afternoon and the Lightning now has a chance to close the series out at home.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Brad Marchand enrages Lightning with lick, low bridge (Video)

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Oh, boy. Here we go again.

If you thought a request from the NHL and scorn from many around the league would stop Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand from unleashing another tongue lashing an opponent, you’d be wrong.

Marchand’s tongue was the center of attention once again on Friday night in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference second-round series against the Tampa Bay Lightning.

With less than 90 seconds left in the second period, Marchand leaned in for the kill on Lightning forward Ryan Callahan and swiped his face with his tongue.

Marchand is in nobody’s good books, and the questionable hit (low bridge) on Callahan moments earlier already had the Lightning in an uproar.

As you’ll remember, Marchand went in for the tongue kill in the first round against the Toronto Maple Leafs when he licked Leo Komarov.

In an in-game interview following the hit, Lightning head coach Jon Cooper told NBC’s Pierre McGuire that Marchand’s low hit is the type that “ends careers.”

In Game 3, Marchand threw a similar hit on Lightning defenseman Dan Girardi.

The Bruins were leading the Lightning 3-2 in the third period, with Marchand notching his second assist on the Patrice Bergeron‘s go-ahead goal.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Palat, Lightning strike down Bruins to take 2-1 series lead

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In Game 2, Brayden Point was the hero and on Wednesday night as the best-of-7 series shifted to Boston, it was Ondrej Palat who sparked the Tampa Bay Lightning to victory.

Notice anything strange here?

If you guessed the answer was a question such as, ‘Where is Steven Stamkos, Nikita Kucherov and J.T. Miller?’ then you’d be on the right track.

The line has a single goal so far in the series (Stamkos scored into the empty net to make Wednesday’s score a 4-1 final), yet the Lightning has rallied since a 6-2 loss in Game 1.

The reason? Secondary scoring, and a whole Palat of it.

It was Palat who scored twice in 1:32 early in the first period on Wednesday, his second and third goal in his past two games. Palat is up to four goals and eight points in eight games in the playoffs.

Both goals were all the Lightning needed as they kept the Bruins’ top line of Patrice Bergeron, David Pastrnak and Brad Marchand at bay (Bergeron scored the lone goal for the Bruins on the night).

The line of Point, Palat and Tyler Johnson has sizzled over the past two games, combining for 10 points as a unit during that time.

Tampa’s second line has picked up the slack with the Bruins paying a lot of attention to Stamkos and Co. It hasn’t been a winning formula as of late, however.

Andrei Vasilevskiy put in another solid performance, turning aside 28-of-29 for the win.

Both teams lock horns again on Friday for Game 4. For the Bruins, a victory will be a must as teams that go up 3-1 in a series have an 89 percent chance of moving on, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

For Boston, avoiding being sent to the brink of eliminations means getting their top line up and running again (they had 11 points combined in Game 1) or finding some scoring from literally anyone else.

Outside of Game 1, the Bruins have been steadily misfiring and need to curb it quickly before the Atlantic Division champs make that impossible.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck