betting

A bet on a whim could net Blues fan $100K, another $50K

4 Comments

If you’re in Las Vegas next year around January and there’s a team in last place, perhaps put a few dollars down on them winning the 2020 Stanley Cup. You never know.

That’s what St. Louis Blues fan Scott Berry did on a business trip at the beginning of the year.

Speaking to The Action Network’s Darren Rovell, Berry bet the $400 he was planning on gambling away on the Blues — at that time a 150-to-1 longshot to win the Cup.

The hotel he was staying at — Paris Las Vegas Hotel — had the Blues at 250-to-1. Telling Rovell it seemed high, he strolled over to the Bellagio and found them at only 150-to-1.

“So I sprinted back to the Paris and put down everything I had planned on spending on gambling — $400,” Berry said. “To win $100,000 sounded really good.”

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

With the Blues beating the San Jose Sharks in six games with a 5-1 win on Tuesday night, Berry is now on the cusp of turning his January bet into a June haul if the Blues win their first Stanley Cup in franchise history.

Berry wasn’t the only one to throw down some cash, either.

Brendan Chapel, who plays with Berry in a rec hockey league, saw the odds after a message from the latter and dropped $200 of his own hard-earned cash on the Blues. He stands to win $50,000 if the Blues can overcome the Boston Bruins, a series that begins next Monday at TD Garden in Boston.

That’s $600 that could turn into $150,000.

MORE: Stanley Cup Final 2019 schedule, TV info

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

NHL embraces more betting with William Hill partnership

1 Comment

OXON HILL, Md. (AP) — The NHL entered its third partnership in six months with a gambling operator on Thursday, another step in its embrace of business opportunities that come with legal sports betting.

The league announced the deal with William Hill shortly before Commissioner Gary Bettman spoke at a sports gambling summit organized by the American Gaming Association, a casino-industry trade group. Last fall, the NHL announced partnerships with MGM and FanDuel.

Bettman had been a staunch defender of the federal law that limited single-game sports betting to Nevada, and he had also been skeptical about NHL fans’ level of interest in gambling. But since the Supreme Court struck down that law last May, allowing any state to authorize sports gambling, he has embraced the change enthusiastically, and he now speaks proudly about a 38 percent increase in bets on NHL games at William Hill’s Nevada sports books this season.

”Once the Supreme Court ruled, you’ve got to get with the program,” Bettman said. ”You have to evolve, you have to innovate and you have to be relevant.”

Sports betting is now legal in eight states, and William Hill runs sports books in Nevada, New Jersey, Mississippi, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. The deal with the NHL will allow William Hill to advertise at arenas and on the league’s online and mobile platforms.

As of now, William Hill has not agreed to pay the NHL for access to its proprietary data. The NHL is developing a system to track player and puck movement through microchips worn by the players and embedded in the pucks. Bettman believes the new data will lend itself to in-game betting opportunities.

One data point valued by gamblers that the league has no plans to disclose is more detailed information on player injuries.

”Most of the injury data affects whether or not a player is going to play. Our guys probably play injured more than in any other sport, and we don’t see any reason to subject them to any further injury risk,” Bettman said. ”We’re transparent about not being transparent.”

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

U.S. sports leagues split on how to monetize sports betting

2 Comments

By Wayne Parry (Associated Press)

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — America’s major professional sports leagues are split on how to get a piece of the action from legal sports betting after failing to get early adopting states to cut them in.

But they are back in the game this year with several state legislatures considering granting them fees from sports bets.

The National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League uniformly fought to stop the spread of sports gambling for years, but retrenched in their positions after a key loss – a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that granted New Jersey and other states the option to allow wagering.

That shift from the courts to statehouses, Congress and the open market has revealed divisions among the leagues in how to approach the inevitability of expanded legal betting.

Some are lobbying individual states to include a 0.25 percent cut of all sports bets placed in their states. Others are concentrating on making free-market deals with individual gambling companies. Some are doing both those things and others say they don’t want or need payments from sportsbooks.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last May that all states are free to legalize sports betting. Eight states currently accept bets with many more expected to follow suit – some soon, others in future years. None of the laws passed in 2018 gave leagues what they’d hoped for.

But at least six states have included fees for the leagues in sports betting bills they are considering this year, with more bills expected.

The NBA, MLB and golf’s PGA Tour began lobbying individual states for direct payments, an idea widely known among legislators and lobbyists as an ”integrity fee” but that the leagues prefer to call a royalty. The leagues say they deserve to be reimbursed for costs to make sure their games are free from scandal and manipulation. They also feel that outside companies making money from games should share profits with those organizing the sports.

”It obviously helps the leagues in providing compensation to us for our product,” said Bryan Seeley, a senior vice president of Major League Baseball. ”It also helps defray the costs for us for integrity and regulatory costs.”

Those costs include hiring additional people to monitor games and betting activity, training players, referees and other league employees on integrity measures, developing special software and hiring outside consultants, said Dan Spillane, an NBA senior vice president. But neither of those leagues would quantify exactly how much integrity measures are costing them or how much is new spending, given that illegal sports betting has been popular in America for a long time and other countries offer legal wagering on their games.

Seeley said gambling companies need to partner with leagues so both sides have incentives to grow appeal and profitability, he said.

”I can’t think of another industry where a class of people is able to make hundreds of millions of dollars off someone else’s product, put risk on that party, and pay them nothing,” Seeley said. ”Some of the revenue that’s going to be made by the gambling companies needs to be shared.”

The NFL – even with the most popular betting sport in the United States – says it never sought such payments.

”Rather, we are focused on game integrity and consumer protection,” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said.

The National Hockey League has put most of its energy into reaching direct deals with gambling companies, including gambling giant MGM Resorts International, one of a flurry of deals the leagues made last year. These pacts have included sportsbooks licensing official league data as well as using league and team logos in marketing and advertising.

”Instead of seeking legislation at the federal level or even at the state level, our approach has been to work directly with the industry,” NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said. ”We believe that, whether it’s our intellectual property, our data, whether it’s video of our game, we have important assets, and if somebody is going to avail themselves or want to avail themselves of those assets in order to conduct their business, then we’re going to need to have a negotiation.”

MLB and the NBA say they are pursuing state-by-state fees and deals with private companies as parallel but independent efforts. David Schwartz, director of the Center for Gaming Research at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, sees that as ”an adjustment by the leagues to the political reality of the situation.”

”I imagine that as the market grows, they will seek various ways to monetize public interest in sports betting, perhaps even some they haven’t thought of yet,” Schwartz said.

At least five states considered royalties to leagues last year before deciding against paying them. The leagues think they’ll do better this year with more lobbying. So far this year, Missouri, New York, Kansas, Illinois, Iowa and Massachusetts have introduced bills providing fees of between 0.2 percent and 1 percent for the leagues.

That doesn’t necessarily mean there’s strong support for the fees in those states. Lawmakers in several of those jurisdictions say they included the fee in bills for the purposes of discussion, but say they’re not convinced it should be adopted.

New York state Sen. Joseph Addabbo Jr. said the bill he sponsored is basically a reintroduction of last year’s unsuccessful bill. He’s not sold on the 0.2 percent fee it would provide to the leagues, noting that Nevada, where sports betting has been legal for years, does not share its revenue with the leagues.

”Somebody is going to have to justify an integrity fee, credibly,” he said. ”The leagues say there’s more work involved in ensuring the integrity of their games; I get it. But I need to maximize the funding for our state. There’s a pie, and everyone wants their little slice. And the state wants the biggest slice.”

Iowa state Rep. Bobby Kaufmann included a 0.25 percent fee in one of his state’s bills because, ”I wanted to give every one of the stakeholders – the casinos, the leagues, the lottery and the horsemen – their ‘dream bill.’ But I don’t believe right now (the fee) has the votes.

”Iowa doesn’t have any pro sports leagues, but our casinos are in 19 different locations,” he said. ”An integrity fee would just direct money away from Iowa to out-of-state entities.”

Missouri state Sen. Paul Wieland opposes such fees, which are in one of his state’s bills.

”I don’t think that the leagues have any rights to fees,” he said. ”The leagues are in the sports and entertainment business, and the casinos are in the gaming business. If the leagues feel they should get something, they should work out individual deals with casinos to be the ‘official sports book of,’ just like beer companies do.”

Illinois state Rep. Mike Zalewski won’t commit to supporting an integrity fee, but is sympathetic to the position of the leagues.

”It’s their product,” Zalewski said. ”They want to have a say in this.”

Some state lawmakers and gambling companies object to the proposed fee taking the form of a percentage of all bets made, as opposed to a percentage of gambling companies’ profits, which is a far smaller number.

One thing the leagues have agreed on with one another is the idea of federal regulation, preferring a single set of uniform rules than different laws in each state. A bill introduced late last year that would have the U.S. Justice Department set minimum standards for states to meet in offering sports betting does not include royalties. But it does not explicitly forbid them, either, and whether such payments are ultimately added is expected to be a central focus or negotiations as it makes its way through Congress.

Associated Press writer Geoff Mulvihill in Philadelphia contributed to this report.

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Lightning, Penguins trending to the OVER on Wednesday Night Hockey

NBCSN’s coverage of the 2018-19 NHL season continues with the Wednesday Night Hockey matchup between the Tampa Bay Lightning and Pittsburgh Penguins. Coverage begins at 7 p.m. ET on NBCSN. You can watch the game online and on the NBC Sports app by clicking here.

Scoring is up in the NHL this season, but the Tampa Bay Lightning and Pittsburgh Penguins have been combining for plenty of offense for years.

The Lightning, led by Nikita Kucherov, are a slim -115 away favorite against the -105 underdog Penguins with a 6.5-goal total on the NHL odds for Wednesday night at sportsbooks monitored by OddsShark.com.

The OddsShark NHL Database shows that not only has the total gone OVER in 19 of the last 20 games in this matchup, but the last 12 matchups have all had at least seven goals. Tampa Bay, thanks to a bye week and the NHL all-star break, is playing for the first time in 11 days and is 7-2 in its last nine away games. The Penguins are 1-4 at home this season against Atlantic Division teams that are currently in a playoff position.

Tampa Bay is 37-10-2 this season, including a 17-5-2 away record. The NHL schedule-maker has affording the Lightning, with their dynamic forward group that includes leading scorer Kucherov and centers Steven Stamkos and Brayden Point, the luxury of not having to jump right back into action upon reconvening following the all-star weekend.

On paper, a well-rested team facing an opponent that has allowed 13 goals over its last two games seems like an excellent matchup for the Lightning, who also boast the NHL’s No. 1 power play (29.5 per cent) and have the fifth-ranked penalty kill (83.6 per cent).

[WATCH LIVE – COVERAGE BEGINS AT 7 P.M. ET – NBCSN]

Lightning goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy, who should get the start, is 5-3-0 with a 2.29 goals-against average and .929 save percentage in eight games in January.

One factor in favor of the Penguins, whose 26-17-6 record includes being 13-8-4 at the PPG Paints Arena, is the embarrassment factor. Any team whose leadership includes captain Sidney Crosby, fellow center Evgeni Malkin and defenseman Kris Letang can be expected to give a peak effort the next time out after a loss such as Monday’s 6-3 setback against the New Jersey Devils.

Both Pittsburgh’s power play (24.8 per cent) and penalty kill (83.1) rank sixth in the NHL, making them the only team other than the Lightning with both special teams units ranked in the top 10, but they were 0-for-5 with the extra skater against New Jersey.

Matt Murray gave up all six goals against New Jersey, but still has a 5-2-0 record with a 2.71 goals-against average and .913 save percentage so far this month. It can be reasonably expected that the Penguins would have Murray get back in net right away after a rough night.

The total has gone OVER in seven of the Lightning’s last 10 away games. The total has also gone OVER in seven of the Penguins’ last 11 home games.

For more odds information, betting picks and a breakdown of this week’s top sports betting news check out the OddsShark podcast with Jon Campbell and Andrew Avery. Subscribe on iTunes or Spotify or listen to it at OddsShark.libsyn.com.

MORE: Kendall Coyne Schofield to serve as NBC Sports analyst on Wednesday Night Hockey

Coyne will join the broadcast team of John Forslund (play-by-play), U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame member Eddie Olczyk (analyst) and Emmy Award-winner Pierre McGuire (‘Inside-the-Glass’ analyst) for the call from PPG Paints Arena in Pittsburgh, Pa., on Wednesday night.

Golden Knights favorites hosting Predators on Wednesday Night Hockey

NBCSN’s coverage of the 2018-19 NHL season continues with the Wednesday Night Hockey matchup between the Nashville Predators and Vegas Golden Knights. Coverage begins at 10 p.m. ET on NBCSN. You can watch the game online and on the NBC Sports app by clicking here.

Disparate divisional trends and a strong bounce-back pattern seem to be riding with the Vegas Golden Knights.

The Golden Knights are the -130 home favorite on the NHL odds with the Nashville Predators coming back at +105, while there is a 6.0-goal total for their matchup on Wednesday at sportsbooks monitored by OddsShark.com.

The second-year Golden Knights, who are 9-4 in their last 13 regular-season home games against the Central Division, will be looking to avoid their first back-to-back home defeats to teams from the other half of the Western Conference after losing 4-2 against the Minnesota Wild on Monday. The Predators are 0-5 in their last five road games against Pacific Division teams, but prior to that had won six in row dating to January 2018.

The Predators are 29-18-4 this season, including a 13-9-4 road record, but are just 2-4 over their last six games according to the OddsShark NHL Database with one of the victories being a 4-1 win on Monday against the Colorado Avalanche, whom they have long dominated.

Only two goals have been scored in the first periods of the last four Predators-Golden Knights contests, so it is not out of the realm that Nashville’s top scoring threats such as center Ryan Johansen and right wing Viktor Arvidsson will have to be patient to wait for opportunities. Another challenge for Nashville is that its power play, converting at a 13.3 percent clip, is 29th in the 31-team NHL whereas the Golden Knights’ penalty kill is fifth (83.8 per cent).

[WATCH LIVE – COVERAGE BEGINS AT 10 P.M. ET – NBCSN]

The Predators are among the NHL teams moving toward a true two-goalie system. Pekka Rinne handled their most recent game but has had a below-par month, going 3-3-1 with a 3.33 goals-against average and .896 save percentage. Juuse Saros is 3-2 with a 1.58 average and .947 save percentage.

The Golden Knights are also 29-18-4, but are 16-5-3 at T-Mobile Arena. While Vegas has been in win-one, lose-one mode with a 3-3 record across its last six games, some positive signs are that they haven’t dropped two in a row, or allowed more than four goals in any of the losses.

The Golden Knights, whose leading scorers are right wing Alex Tuch and left wing Jonathan Marchessault, roll four lines with speed and often create an edge in offensive zone pressure and shot attempts. Whether that lends itself to scoring a lot of goals can depend on the quality and the form of the opposing goalie. The Golden Knights will have an 18th-ranked power play (18.5 percent) facing Nashville’s 16th-ranked penalty kill (79.9 percent).

Golden Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury is 5-3 with a 2.28 goals-against average and .913 save percentage in eight games so far in January.

The total has gone OVER in eight of Nashville’s last 10 road games at sports betting sites. The total has gone UNDER in four of Vegas’ last seven games as a home favorite.

For more odds information, betting picks and a breakdown of this week’s top sports betting news check out the OddsShark podcast with Jon Campbell and Andrew Avery. Subscribe on iTunes or Spotify or listen to it at OddsShark.libsyn.com.

Kenny Albert (play-by-play), Eddie Olczyk (analyst) and Pierre McGuire (‘Inside-the-Glass’ analyst) will have the call from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. Nev.