Andrew Cogliano

Acciari hat trick
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The Buzzer: Penguins prolong Oilers’ woes; Incendiary Acciari

Three Stars

1. Noel Acciari, Florida Panthers

Acciari never generated a multi-goal game before Monday’s hat trick. The Panthers forward authored quite a few firsts this week, as he added another hat trick (a natural one, too) against Dallas. Acciari completed his hat trick with a penalty shot goal, collecting another first.

Acciari actually assisted on a Vincent Trocheck goal for his point of the night, so he generated four overall on Friday. Click here for more on Acciari’s stunning spurt of hat tricks.

2. Nicklas Backstrom, Washington Capitals

Backstrom and Alex Ovechkin celebrated their 900th game together by bullying the poor Devils.

Backstrom matched Acciari by generating four points on Friday. In Backstrom’s case, the Swede collected two goals and two assists. The Capitals point out that this outburst pushes Backstrom to 900 points in his 900 games alongside Ovechkin. (Consider that an early factoid.)

Ovechkin and John Carlson enjoyed one-goal, one-assist nights themselves.

3. William Nylander, Toronto Maple Leafs

Last season, Nylander struggled after finally signing with Toronto, finishing with 27 points in 54 games. The 23-year-old reached 27 points on Friday, merely Nylander’s 36th game of 2019-20. Nylander produced two goals and one assist against New Jersey on Friday.

Generating 27 points in 36 games would translate to a 61 or 62 point pace (hinging on if you round up). Nylander managing such a pace would almost be too fitting, as 61 points is his career-high from both 2016-17 and 2017-18.

Highlight of the Night (non-Acciari division)

Picture a Maple Leafs – Rangers game, and you’ll envision lots of goals and plenty of mistakes. The two teams delivered, with Mitch Marner really making the Rangers pay on this nice goal. Jacob Trouba bumping him likely hurt a lot less:

Comic relief by way of a fight

Hockey players humble us with their feats of athletic fancy, so this goofy “fight” between Miles Wood and Nick Jensen serves as an amusing change of pace:

Factoids

Scores

TOR 6 – NYR 3
WSH 6 – NJD 3
FLA 7 – DAL 4
PIT 5 – EDM 2

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Trade: Ducks get younger, ship Cogliano to Stars for Shore

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The Anaheim Ducks, losers of 11 in a row, and the Dallas Stars, who have dropped three of their last four, made a good ol’ hockey trade Monday morning by swapping forwards Andrew Cogliano and Devin Shore.

On Sunday night Ducks general manager Bob Murray released a statement following yet another defeat stating he was sticking with head coach Randy Carlyle and he would be focused “on our players, specifically with who is going to step up in this situation.” A goal by Cogliano Sunday night was apparently not enough to keep him in Orange County.

“In acquiring Andrew, we are able to add a conscientious player who brings a veteran-presence to our room,” said Stars GM Nill in a statement. “His explosive speed, 200-foot game and iron-man mentality will help our team both on and off the ice.”

The Stars have their own issues this season, as have been documented, and while this move to acquire a veteran in Cogliano (3-8—11 pts.) will give them an upgrade in their bottom-six, he also carries some cap implications. He’ll turn 32 in June and his contract, which carries a $3.25M cap hit, expires after the 2020-21 NHL season. As someone who’s missed only two games in his entire 12-year career — and only due to suspension — he’ll be a veteran presence who will allow Jim Montgomery to re-jigger his lines and free up someone like Radek Faksa, who can provide more offense than he has this season.

Shore (5-2—17 pts.) will be 25 in July and carries a $2.3M cap hit through the end of next season. He’ll bring a bit of a two-way presence and help the penalty kill and, more importantly for the Ducks, is younger, cheaper and not signed as long as Cogliano.

The Ducks are in the midst of a big losing streak and the Stars were called out by their head coach on Saturday for having a “culture of mediocrity”. Both Murray and Nill may be seeking bigger trades to shake their teams out of their respective funks, but those deals aren’t always out there or beneficial to one side.

We’ll see if this move is a precursor to more wheeling and dealing from each GM, but for the time being it’s an upgrade with speed for the Stars, and for the Ducks it’s youth plus cap help in the future, as well as an attempt to wake-up his team.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Andrew Cogliano chokes up talking about the end of his iron-man streak

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An emotional Andrew Cogliano said having his iron-man streak ended by suspension was a “tough pill to swallow.”

Speaking to Fox Sports’ Kent French prior to the Anaheim Ducks 3-1 loss against the Colorado Avalanche on Monday, Cogliano choked up when asked about how tough the past 24 hours had been like for him.

“It’s a tough pill to swallow, I’m not going to lie,” Cogliano said, fighting back tears. “I’ve played hard and I’ve battled. I’m a professional in that I’ve played a long time and I’ve now missed a game.”

Cogliano was suspended Sunday for two games following an illegal check to the head of Los Angeles Kings forward Adrian Kempe in a 4-2 Ducks win on Saturday.

The ban ended the NHL’s fourth-longest games played streak at 830 games for Cogliano, who had never missed action in his 11-year NHL career before Monday.

Cogliano was a 134 games shy of Doug Jarvis’ record of 964 consecutive games played, which the Ducks forward would have reached at the start of the 2019-2020 if he remained healthy.

“First and foremost I think, I probably initiated contact too late,” Cogliano said. “I’ve been very open about that with this process, and I made a mistake at that time.

“As I think about the hit though, I watch it and I still see that my body doesn’t change through the process of it. I think my shoulders are low, my elbows are low, my knees are bent and I’m in a pretty set position. As it evolves, he tries to make a play back across my body, which ends up maybe initiating some head contact near my upper back area. That’s what I see. I think there’s no injury, he came back and played. At the end of the day from what I’ve seen, it is a situation where we closed the gap on each other a little bit.”

Despite the hit, which clearly showed Cogliano nail Kempe in the head well after the puck had left the vicinity, Cogliano was surprised about hearing he was going to have a chat with the league.

“I was told after the game from Bob [Murray] that I was going to have a hearing or have a call,” Cogliano said. “I was surprised because no one said anything after the game to me otherwise. There was no media talking about it or nothing was brought up, so I was more surprised about that. Initially, I was thinking back on it, wondering what happened and wondering if I did anything bad.

“Obviously, you never want to injure anyone on the ice. That’s a fact. I’ve played 11 years and that’s one thing that I have stood behind and I’m glad he played the rest the game. From my end, there’s zero intent to do any sort of head contact or hit a person to injure them. I think it was a situation where I admitted to initiating contact too late and I think it was something that happened that ended up being very unfortunate for me.”

Cogliano said his teammates, and at least one Ducks legend, have offered their support.

“I’m probably being too dramatic about it. I’m sorry my emotions came out for whatever reason. I have had a lot of support.” Cogliano said. “I think there has been a lot of people that have reached out and initiated that I have done something special. The more I look back on it, it’s pretty cool. I think that playing 830 games in a row, not a lot of guys can say that and I think that’s something that I will hold to my heart.

“I appreciate all the texts. [Teemu] Selanne has been a big advocate in terms of reaching out. I may be making too big a deal of it, but I think when you go through the process and think back about coming to work and playing every single game for 11 straight years, it holds some value and holds some value to a lot of the guys in the league. Like I said, this is the last way I wanted it to go out. I’m glad he wasn’t injured and I’ll take the suspension, move on and come back and help my team.”


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Andrew Cogliano’s 830-game ironman streak ends with suspension

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The fourth-longest games played streak in NHL history has come to an end via suspension.

Andrew Cogliano of the Anaheim Ducks has been suspended two game for interfering with Adrian Kempe of the Los Angeles Kings Saturday night. Cogliano delivered a late hit that will see the end of his 830-game ironman streak.

Here’s the NHL Department of Player Safety’s reasoning:

It’s a good call by the DoPS. As the video shows, you can see just how late Cogliano delivers the hit on Kempe. So much time had passed, Kempe was not expecting to be hit like he was.

Cogliano has never missed a game in his NHL career since breaking in at the start of the 2007-08 season. Had he remained in the Ducks’ lineup for the rest of this regular season, he would have passed Steve Larmer (884) next month. Anaheim handed him a three-year extension this week, which meant Doug Jarvis’ record of 964 consecutive games played would have been threatened at the start of the 2019-20 season.

So who is the new NHL Ironman? That would be Keith Yandle of the Florida Panthers, who’s played 676 straight regular season games. Right behind him is Toronto Maple Leafs forward Patrick Marleau (669) and Phil Kessel of the Pittsburgh Penguins (655).

All good things come to an end, but it’s too bad that Cogliano’s shot at a tough-to-reach NHL record is ending due to a suspension. Not missing one of 830 regular season games is an impressive feat, and now it’ll be fun to watch Yandle, Marleau and Kessel try and stay healthy to threaten Jarvis’ record.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Andrew Cogliano’s player safety hearing could put ironman record in jeopardy

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Andrew Cogliano is 134 shy of Doug Jarvis’ ironman streak of 964 games played in a row.

And that’s as close as he might get pending the outcome of a hearing with the NHL’s player safety department on Sunday.

Yes, Cogliano’s streak of 830 games played — the longest active streak in the NHL — is in real jeopardy after an illegal check to the head of Los Angeles Kings forward Adrian Kempe in Saturday’s 4-2 win for Cogliano’s Anaheim Ducks.

Cogliano was handed a two-minute penalty for interference on the play, and his shoulder’s principal point of contact was clearly Kempe’s head. (You can watch several angles of the play if you click on the Streamable link in the tweet).

Cogliano has never missed a game in his 11-year NHL career.

On Friday, Cogliano signed a new three-year contract extension for the Ducks.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck