Alex Kerfoot

PHT Morning Skate: Bergeron out indefinitely; Ovechkin’s early D.C. days

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• On the Robert Bortuzzo suspension: “According to the Department of Player Safety, the act alone would typically lead to only a fine, rather than a suspension. That was the case in October 2017, when Bortuzzo was fined the maximum allowed ($3,091.40) under the Collective Bargaining Agreement for cross-checking New York Islanders forward Brock Nelson while Nelson was down on the ice — a ‘very similar play’ to the Arvidsson incident, although at the time, ‘he didn’t have the history,’ according to Player Safety. But this time, Bortuzzo was a repeat offender, having been suspended three games (two preseason games, one regular-season game) for elbowing Michal Kempny of the Washington Capitals in September 2018. That, combined with the injury to Arvidsson and a history of similar acts, raised this incident to the level of a four-game suspension rather than a fine.” [ESPN]

Alex Kerfoot on his two-game suspension: “I feel terrible about the incident … I didn’t mean to do it by any means, but it’s a bad spot on the ice and something I should not be doing.” [The Star] 

• A lower-body injury will keep the Bruins’ Patrice Bergeron out for at least the next two games. [NBC Sports Boston]

• The chemistry between Max Domi and Nick Suzuki has been fun to watch. [Eyes on the Prize]

• A fun read about the early days of Alex Ovechkin in Washington D.C. [Capitals]

• The other part of the Jacob Trouba deal, Neal Pionk, is doing real well with the Jets. [Winnipeg Free Press]

• Why Hockey Fights Cancer is meaningful to Ryan Dzingel of the Hurricanes. [News and Observer]

• How cancer forced Kings trainer Chris Kingsley to take care of himself [LA Times]

• It’s time for the Devils to reunite Jack Hughes and Nikita Gusev. [Pucks and Pitchforks]

• Keying in on defense has helped the Sharks turn things around. [NBC Sports Bay Area]

• A look at how the Viktor Arvidsson injury will affect the Predators’ lineup. [Predlines]

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Kerfoot to have hearing; elite Vrana

CapsPup / Twitter

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Captain the dog meets Jay Beagle. [CapsPup – Twitter]

• Mike Babcock’s gone so that means it’s time for all the dirty laundry to be aired. “Babcock was alleged to have asked one of the Leafs’ rookies to list the players on the team from hardest-working to those who, in the eyes of the rookie, didn’t have a strong work ethic. The rookie did so, not wanting to upset his coach, but was taken aback when Babcock told the players who had been listed at the bottom.” [Toronto Sun]

• It’s early days but things are going pretty smoothly for the Maple Leafs under Sheldon Keefe. [Toronto Star]

Alex Kerfoot of the Maple Leafs will have a Monday hearing with the NHL Department of Player Safety for boarding Avalanche defenseman Erik Johnson Saturday night. [NHL.com]

Quinn Hughes has been impressive early on in his rookie season with the Canucks. [Sporting News]

• Why it’s time for Jakub Vrana to be included in the elite winger discussion. [Japers’ Rink]

• The Bruins have released their third jerseys for this season and they’re not bad. They’ll debut them Friday against the Rangers (1 p.m. ET; NBC) during the Thanksgiving Showdown. [NBC Sports Boston]

• The youth movement continues in Detroit as the Red Wings have recalled Filip Zadina from the AHL. [MLive]

• Great read on legendary Getty Images photographer Bruce Bennett. [Sportsnet]

• Grading Artemi Panarin’s first quarter as a New York Ranger. [Blueshirt Banter]

• Blackhawks goalie Robin Lehner is looking for advice in the shootout. [NBC Sports Chicago]

Tuukka Rask and Jordan Binnington lead the goalie crop in the fantasy hockey world this week. [RotoWorld]

• Finally, spin-o-rama to the moonwalk. Solid, kid:

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Analyzing the Avalanche after Colorado re-signs J.T. Compher

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The Colorado Avalanche’s offseason continues to come into focus, even as we’re in more of a housekeeping mode, rather than a more exciting time of dramatic renovations.

Earlier, the Avalanche signed intriguing new addition Andre Burakovsky at a bargain $3.25 million rate. While I would’ve been even more excited if the Avalanche would have bought more term, it’s still a nice move, and Burakovsky’s still slated to be an RFA after this one-year re-up expires.

The medium-sized moves continued on Wednesday, with Colorado handing forward J.T. Compher an interesting four-year deal reportedly worth $3.5M per season.

Overall, it’s fairly easy to understand. Compher scored both 16 goals and assists on his way to 32 points last season, despite being limited to 66 games. He quietly logged a lot of minutes (17:29 TOI per game), and had some utility, although the Avalanche might be wise to ease some of his PK duties going forward.

You can dig deeper into certain numbers, or make some tough comparisons, and start to feel not-quite-as-good about Compher’s new contract.

[ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker]

After all, Compher possesses the same contract as now-former teammate Alex Kerfoot, who will carry $3.5M for four seasons with Toronto. On one hand, it’s not as though Colorado necessarily chose to keep Compher over Kerfoot; it’s very plausible that the analytics-savvy Maple Leafs wanted Kerfoot to make that Nazem KadriTyson Barrie deal work, in the first place. On the other hand, the comparisons are natural when you consider their identical deals. Comparing the two using visualizations including Evolving Hockey’s Regularized Adjusted Plus/Minus (RAPM) makes this contract look less appealing:

via Evolving Hockey

Compher doesn’t need to equal or exceed Kerfoot’s value to be worth $3.5M per year to the Avalanche, though, and there’s a solid chance that they’ll be fine with this contract.

It does open up an opportunity to ponder where Colorado is, though.

The Avalanche still have a big-ticket item to re-sign, as Mikko Rantanen is one of the many RFAs heading for a big raise alongside the likes of Mitch Marner and Brayden Point. If Colorado can convince Rantanen to sign somewhere in the team-friendly range that the Carolina Hurricanes enjoy with Sebastian Aho, or the borderline insane deal the San Jose Sharks landed with Timo Meier, then Colorado would continue to look like one of the smartest people in the room.

But how many steps have the Avs taken after upsetting the Flames in Round 1 and pushing the Sharks hard in Round 2 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs?

Tom Hunter of Mile High Hockey projected next season’s lineup, figuring that Compher will center a third line with two sneaky-good analytics wingers in Colin Wilson and Joonas Donskoi, while Kadri could center a second line with Tyson Jost and Andre Burakovsky around him.

Losing Kerfoot stings, but on paper, that does seem like a middle-six that could ease some of the burden for that all-world trio of Rantanen, Nathan MacKinnon, and Gabriel Landeskog. It’s also plausible that the Avs could try to move different pieces around to see if one of MacKinnon or Rantanen could carry their own line, thus diversifying the Avs’ attack.

Yet, with the Central Division continuing to look like a beastly group, it’s tough to say where Colorado fits. Is this team more wild-card material, or will a boosted supporting cast push them to a new level? There’s also the possibility that things don’t work out the same way as they did in 2018-19, from that MacKinnon line slowing to maybe the goaltending falling short.

Whatever value Compher ultimately brings, along with newcomers like Burakovsky, Kadri, and Donskoi, a mild itch for something bolder remains for some of us (I blame the NBA’s run where the West is revolutionized every week, seemingly). At least Avs fans can let their imaginations run wild, as there could be some space left over, even after Rantanen gets paid:

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Maple Leafs ink Kerfoot, Ceci to extensions

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Toronto Maple Leafs general manager Kyle Dubas has done a great job of creating cap space for his team, and it’s allowed him to re-sign a pair of trade acquisitions in Alex Kerfoot and Cody Ceci.

Per TSN’s Darren Dreger, Kerfoot has inked a four-year, $14 million extension ($3.5 million AAV) with the club and Ceci has signed a one-year, $4.5 million contract. Before these two deals were handed out, the Leafs had just over $11 million in cap space. Once these two contracts are made official, they’ll be down to roughly $3.765 million in cap space.

Kerfoot is expected to serve as the third line center for the Leafs heading into this year. Last year, that spot was occupied by Nazem Kadri, who made $4.5 million per year, so there’s a $1 million savings there. As for Ceci, he’ll serve as a replacement for Nikita Zaitsev, who was also making $4.5 million but on a long-term contract. So even though there’s no cap relief this year, there could be some coming in the near future.

The Leafs, of course, still have one more player they need to re-sign and he’s going to be expensive too. So what kind of money to they have left over for Mitch Marner?

We mentioned the $3.765 million in cap space they currently have, but that number will increase once they put Nathan Horton‘s $5.3 million cap hit on long-term injured reserve. That puts them back close $9 million in available cap space.

Including Kerfoot and Marner, Toronto has 14 forwards under contract. They’ll likely be sending at least one of those extra bodies down to the minors, which means another $700,000 could be coming off the books. They also have eight defenseman on the roster, so they can opt to carry seven guys if they wanted to.

[ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker]

So let’s recap the cap situation:

The Leafs currently have $3.765 million available to spend. They’ll put Nathan Horton’s $5.3 million hit on LTIR ($9.065 million in available space after that move is made). They can also send two players making roughly $700,000 each to the AHL without them counting on the cap. That would give them $10.465 million in available funds to spend on Marner. Will that be enough? No one can say for sure, but it’s in the ball park.

The team will look different when it hits the ice next year, but we always knew that was going to be the case because of the salaries they already had on the books. Dubas has done a good job of improving the roster as a whole while leaving himself some money to play with to make sure he could bring back key parts, too.

Now they just have to iron a contract out with Marner.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Maple Leafs, Avs make blockbuster trade featuring Kadri, Barrie

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If you thought the Toronto Maple Leafs and Colorado Avalanche almost seemed too quiet on free agent day … well, they combined for one whopper of a trade late on July 1.

It’s a lot to process, but here are the terms.

Maple Leafs receive:

  • Underrated right-handed defenseman Tyson Barrie, with the Avs retaining half of his cap hit on a deal that expires after next season. So Barrie only costs $2.75M on Toronto’s cap.
  • RFA center Alex Kerfoot. He’s a sneaky-good two-way player, but doesn’t have a deal yet.
  • The Avalanche’s 2020 sixth-round pick.

Avalanche receive:

  • The biggest piece is Nazem Kadri, a talented center who’s nonetheless become a lightning rod for controversy after being suspended for two consecutive postseasons. As controversial as Kadri can be, he’s an excellent forward who carries only a $4.5M cap hit through 2021-22.
  • Defenseman Calle Rosen.
  • The Maple Leafs’ 2020 third-round pick.

Maple Leafs work some magic

Personally, I’ve almost always been impressed with Kyle Dubas’ work as Maple Leafs GM, yet I’ve also been a little sad that we haven’t seen him be too creative, what with a team that’s largely been put in place for him.

Well, a cap crunch certainly forced him to use his brain, and the results are impressive.

Via Cap Friendly, the Maple Leafs now have about $11.1 million in cap space. They also still have some of their toughest work to do.

Most obviously, Mitch Marner is still an RFA who could conceivably eat up all of that $11.1M. The Maple Leafs have already seen the Montreal Canadiens throw out an offer sheet to Sebastian Aho, and while Toronto would gladly match something close to that $8.4M+ range if that’s what came Marner’s way, there’s no guarantee that Toronto would enjoy such a manageable challenge.

Of course, there’s also no guarantee that any other NHL team will tender a viable offer sheet during this offseason.

The Maple Leafs also need to sort out Cody Ceci‘s situation, and Kerfoot himself is an RFA whose situation must be settled. TSN’s Darren Dreger reports that Kerfoot is expected to file for salary arbitration, and the award could exceed $3M.

So, there’s still some uncertainty hovering around the Maple Leafs. The biggest factor revolves around sorting out Marner’s situation. To do so, Dubas might need to make even more moves, and you can’t totally rule out moving the rights to Kerfoot and/or Ceci as time goes along.

But, as is, the Maple Leafs are in a profoundly better situation on July 1 than they were even at the end of June.

One could argue that Barrie is Jake Gardiner‘s equal, nearly at Gardiner’s level, or even better. That might come down to personal taste. One thing that’s not debatable is that Barrie is a better fit. While Gardiner with Morgan Rielly and Jake Muzzin meant a glut of left-handed defensemen, Barrie is a RHD. This immediately gives Toronto better balance on defense, as RHD was their biggest weakness.

Now people can debate Barrie vs. Rielly, even.

About the only bummer is that Barrie’s contract expires after 2019-20, and considering his lofty point totals, he may end up being too expensive to keep around. Then again, who’s to say that Dubas doesn’t make another swap that buys Toronto some cost certainty?

The longer term discussion is interesting, yet as it stands, this is a fantastic boost.

One could argue that Kadri is a better asset than Barrie, particularly since his contract runs through 2021-22 at that affordable $4.5M clip. Still, with John Tavares and Auston Matthews firmly planted ahead of Kadri, and with William Nylander as at least a plausible option at 3C at times, Kadri was expendable. Even beyond the whole “Sometimes Kadri sees red, then loses his mind and gets suspended, including during the playoffs” thing.

Kerfoot is an intriguing talent if Toronto can keep everyone together, too, so this is promising stuff.

Avalanche add some certainty, still have a bunch of cap space

On paper, I’m more excited about the Maple Leafs’ side of the deal, at least potentially. Right-handed defensemen of Barrie’s caliber just aren’t available very often, and certainly not at a $2.75M clip, even if it’s just for one season. And, depending upon how Toronto can manage things with Kerfoot, the drop off at center might not be that steep for Toronto.

Don’t let all the disdain for Kadri fool you, though. He’s very good, and was almost certainly overqualified as a 3C this past season. The Avalanche seemed primed to part ways with Barrie, what with his contract up after 2019-20, and rising defensive prospects possibly set to usurp him anyway, including Cale Makar and Bowen Byram, in particular.

The Avalanche remarkably have $27.125M in cap space left over, according to Cap Friendly. Mikko Rantanen will take a huge bit out of that, possibly at a level comparable to whatever Mitch Marner makes, and Andre Burakovsky might not be cheap, either. Nikita Zadorov also lingers as an RFA, yet there’s a chance the Avalanche might get yet another piece … might they also look at former Maple Leafs defenseman Jake Gardiner?

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Overall, this is a fascinating trade between two young, exciting, rising, and well-run teams. We could very well be debating the merits of this one for some time, and heck, maybe a future Stanley Cup Final would be the ultimate lab to test the experiment?

In the cases of Colorado and Toronto, there’s also a “to be continued” element, as both teams have enormously important RFAs to re-sign. If this trade is any indication: buckle up.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.