2020 NHL Draft

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How aggressive should Blue Jackets be at trade deadline?

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We need to talk a little more about the Columbus Blue Jackets because they are one of the most fascinating teams in the NHL right now.

Not only for their recent hot streak, but for what might still be ahead of them over the next couple of months.

Thanks to their win in New York on Sunday night, capped off with an Oliver Bjorkstrand goal with 26 seconds to play in regulation, they hold the first Wild Card spot in the Eastern Conference and are one of the hottest teams in the NHL. They are 15-2-4 since Dec. 9, while their overall record through 50 games is actually one point better than it was at the same point a year ago. Considering their offseason and the almost unbelievable run of injuries they have experienced once the season began, they are one of the biggest surprises in the league.

It all creates a pretty interesting discussion for what their front office does — or is able to do — before the NHL trade deadline.

1. They are in a position to buy, not sell

That is not up for much debate, either. This is the same team and front office that went all in before last season’s trade deadline at a time when they were still on the outside of the playoff picture. Not only are they in a playoff position right now, they are just one point back of the New York Islanders for the third spot in the Metropolitan Division.

There is also this: Their upcoming schedule through the trade deadline and end of February really softens up with only five of their next 16 games coming against teams that currently rank higher than 19th in the league in points percentage. Three of those games (two against Philadelphia, one against Florida) will be against teams they could be directly competing with for a playoff spot.

There is a chance to gain even more ground and solidify their spot even more.

2. What they need and what they have to spend

What they have to spend: A lot. The only teams with more salary cap space to spend ahead of the deadline are the New Jersey Devils, Ottawa Senators, and Colorado Avalanche. Out of that group, only the Avalanche will be in a position to buy. The Blue Jackets, in theory, could add any player that is theoretically available before the trade deadline.

What they need: At the start of the season the easy — and expected — answer here would have been a goalie given the uncertainty of Joonas Korpisalo and Elvis Merzlikins and their ability to replace Bobrovsky. After some early struggles, they have turned out to be the Blue Jackets’ biggest bright spot as that tandem has combined for the second-best five-on-five save percentage in the NHL and the third-best all situations save percentage. They have been great, and especially Merzlikins with his recent play.

What they really need now is some scoring. Getting healthy would help a lot (Cam Atkinson just returned to the lineup; Josh Anderson, Alexandre Texier are still sidelined) but they do not have a single player in the top-77 of the league in scoring (Pierre-Luc Dubois is 78th), and only two in the top-120 (Dubuois and Gustav Nyquist).

As a team, they are 24th in the league in goals per game.

Looking around the league, obvious forward rentals would include Tyler Toffoli (Los Angeles Kings), Chris Kreider (New York Rangers), Ilya Kovalchuk (Montreal Canadiens), and Jean-Gabriel Pageau (Ottawa Senators). Potential trade options with term still remaining might include Jason Zucker (Minnesota Wild) or Tomas Tatar (Montreal).

3. The problem: How aggressive can they be?

The downside to their “all in” trade deadline a year ago is that it absolutely decimated their draft pick cupboard for two years. They were left with just three picks in the 2019 class (none before pick No. 108) and as it stands right now they have just five picks in 2020, with only one of them (a first-round pick) slated to be in the top-100.

While players like Texier and Emil Benstrom are good prospects, their farm system is not the deep and the younger players currently on the NHL roster (Dubuois, Seth Jones, Werenski) are players they are going to build around.

That seriously limits what they can do.

Is general manager Jarmo Kekalainen in a position to trade another first-round pick to add to what is a pretty good, but probably not great team? Is there a player available that can a big enough difference to make that worth it? If there is, that player can not be a rental. It has to be a player that has meaningful term left on their contract and can be a part of the organization beyond just this season.

Even if you assume the Blue Jackets will not be able to maintain their current hot streak (and they will cool off at some point) they have at the very least put themselves in a position where they are going to be in the playoff race with a very good chance of making it. This is also not a team in a “rebuild” mode, either. When you are in that position you owe it to your fans and the players in that room to try to win. For the Blue Jackets, it is just a matter of how much they can do and how aggressive they should be over the next few weeks.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

NHL extends Buffalo’s agreement to host combine through 2022

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BUFFALO, N.Y. — The NHL’s top prospects will continue making their pre-draft stops in Buffalo for at least another three years.

The league on Monday announced an extension of its agreement to hold its annual scouting combine in Buffalo at the Sabres downtown practice facility, LECOM Harborcenter, through 2022. The announcement coincided with NHL Central Scouting releasing its mid-season rankings of draft-eligible prospects, with Quebec-born left wing Alexis Lafreniere topping the list of North American skaters.

Buffalo has hosted the combine since 2015, after the weeklong event spent the previous 20-plus years being held at various locations around Toronto.

”I’m very excited about it,” said Kevyn Adams, former NHL player and Sabres senior vice president of business administration. ”It’s an incredible opportunity for us as an organization and city to host such a great event for the last number of years, and now that it’s moving forward.”

Each year, Central Scouting invites more than 100 of its top-ranked prospects to the combine, where they undergo physical and medical testing, and also meet with team executives. It’s considered the final major step in their pre-draft process, and traditionally held about three weeks before the draft.

The move from Toronto was prompted by the construction of the Sabres’ $200 million practice complex which includes two rinks, a hotel, restaurant and workout facility, all connected to the team’s arena.

Though the combine does not include on-ice testing, the floor of Harborcenter’s main rink provides plenty of room for prospect testing to be conducted, while also allowing team executives to watch from the stands.

Those are considered upgrades from when the combine took place inside carpeted convention centers and hotel ballrooms in suburban Toronto.

In Buffalo, teams also have the advantage of going across the street to hold in-person meetings with prospects in arena suites. That’s a switch from Toronto, where prospects had to be shuttled to various hotels, depending on where each team was based.

”It just seems to be a pretty good fit, and I do think the three-year term is indicative of that,” Adams said. ”In Toronto, it was spread out a little bit and just the logistics of it. When the the players and team management get here, it’s all here.”

Central Scouting director Dan Marr referred to the setup in Buffalo as ideal and featuring a venue that meets all needs.

”The NHL’s annual scouting combine is one of the most valuable experiences in a young prospects’ draft year, and we are thrilled to continue utilizing the Sabres best-in-class facilities,” Marr said.

Lafreniere continues making a case for being the No. 1 pick in showing no signs of slowing a season after being name the Canadian Hockey League player of the year. In his third season with Rimouski, he leads the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League with 49 assists and 73 points in 34 games. He was also named the world junior championship tournament’s MVP after helping Canada to a gold-medal victory earlier this month.

U.S. Developmental team defenseman Jake Sanderson, of Whitefish, Montana, is the top-ranked American-born prospect, coming in at 11th. Forward Tim Stuetzle, who plays for Mannheim in his native Germany’s pro league, is the top-ranked European prospect.

This year’s combine was already on the NHL calendar, and scheduled to take place June 1-6.

The combine is also a boon to Buffalo by annually attracting some 250 NHL executives, scouts and media to the city and its redeveloped waterfront.

”This is exciting news for the Sabres, downtown Buffalo and our great hockey fans in the region,” Mayor Byron Brown said. ”The three-year extension is the hat-trick of extensions and will allow so many visitors during the NHL combine to experience our fabulous Canalside area, waterfront development and downtown development for years to come.”

Sabres trade Scandella to Canadiens, acquire Frolik from Flames

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The Buffalo Sabres have had a logjam on their blue line all season and it has long been assumed they would deal from that depth to try and address their forward situation.

They finally did that on Thursday night in two separate deals.

First, they sent defenseman Marco Scandella to the Montreal Canadiens for a 2020 fourth-round draft pick. That pick originally belonged to the San Jose Sharks.

They followed that deal by trading that same fourth-round pick to the Calgary Flames for forward Michael Frolik.

Let’s break all of this down team-by-team.

The Canadiens side

This is a pretty easy one to figure out. Scandella is a pretty significant upgrade to their top-six on defense and it cost them next to nothing to get him. Even after trading a fourth-round pick to Buffalo for him they still have 11 picks in the 2020 class including three in the fourth-round alone. They had the picks to spare, and Scandella, 29, should be a nice addition. He has three goals and six assists in 31 games this season and was one of Buffalo’s best players when it came to driving possession. His 52.8 Corsi mark was second-best on the team and tops among the team’s defenders. He will be eligible for unrestricted free agency this summer.

The Canadiens made another smaller move on Thursday, trading defenseman Mike Reilly to the Ottawa Senators for forward Andrew Sturtz and a 2021 fifth-round draft pick.

The Sabres side

The Scandella trade seemed a little weird at first glance. Yes, they needed to move a defenseman, and given his contract Scandella seemed to be a likely candidate. But trading him for a fourth-round pick this far ahead of the trade deadline seemed premature.

There had to be a corresponding move coming for it to make sense. That is where Frolik comes in. And once the dust settled they essentially traded Scandella for Frolik, which seems about right. Both players are unrestricted free agents after the season, the Sabres had too many defenders, and they badly needed help at forward, especially with Jeff Skinner sidelined.

Frolik is having a down year offensively (just five goals and five assists in 38 games), but he has been a safe bet for around 15 goals, 30 points, and great possession numbers throughout his career. There is a chance he can help them more than Scandella could in the short-term. Will that be enough to stop their slide and get back into a playoff spot? That remains to be seen.

The Flames side

The name of the game here is simply dumping salary and clearing salary cap space. They had been shopping Frolik for a while now and it was only a matter of time until they moved him. By doing so they shed some valuable salary cap space that could enable to make a more significant addition before the trade deadline. The trade also gives them a fourth-round pick, something they had been lacking. They now have seven draft picks this year.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Canada’s Lafreniere to miss Czech Republic game at World Junior Championship

OSTRAVA, Czech Republic — Alexis Lafreniere’s knee injury will keep him out of Canada’s next game at the world junior hockey championship.

However, the star winger hasn’t been ruled out for the rest of the tournament.

The 18-year-old was helped off the ice early in the second period of his team’s 6-0 loss to Russia on Saturday after twisting his left knee on an awkward fall.

Canadian assistant coach Andre Tourigny said Sunday an MRI done on the joint revealed no fracture or structural damage to ligaments.

Lafreniere has been ruled out of Canada’s game against Germany on Monday, but he could return later in the under-20 tournament.

Lafreniere, projected to be the No. 1 pick at the 2020 NHL draft, scored the winning goal and added three assists in Canada’s 6-4 victory over the United States on Dec. 26.

He has 23 goals and 70 points in 32 games this season with the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League’s Rimouski Oceanic.

The Canadians play host Czech Republic on Tuesday before the medal round starts Thursday.

NHL Draft: Top 31 prospect rankings for 2020

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By Ryan Wagman, McKeen’s Hockey lead prospect writer

After providing a few mock drafts for Rotoworld towards the tail end of last season, I have been asked to make the mock a more regular feature for 2019-20. To that extent, this marks the jumping off point for 2019-20 NHL draft coverage here, with a look at McKeen’s Hockey’s first draft rankings. It is obviously too early to make this a traditional mock draft, in that the NHL standings are too fresh to presume which team will finish in what order, not to mention how the various teams will want to pick players.

Beyond that, it is very early for the players we are about to introduce as well. As an NHL scout taught me when I first begin to watch with intent*, most draft eligible players really only begin to take off after Christmas and the World Juniors. 

*While what I do is effectively scouting, I will reserve that terminology for those whose scouting will have a direct impact on the selections made by their employers. Neither McKeens nor Rotoworld is currently in the business of putting hockey teams together.

So in addition to the three late season mock drafts such as we did last year, there will be three additional, earlier mocks, starting with the one you are reading today. As the months pass, the draft picture will become clearer, just like the various skill sets of the players up for discussion will refine their games and clarify what they will become at their respective peaks.

As always, the players listed and the insights into their games have come from the McKeen’s Hockey scouting team. We have dedicated watchers with intent in rinks across the Northern Hemisphere and this and subsequent lists would not be possible without their collective input.

Without further blather, here is an early look at the top 31 draft candidates for the 2020 NHL Draft.

1. Alexis Lafreniere, LW, Rimouski Oceanic, QMJHL – Two years before his draft eligible season, Lafreniere topped the point per game mark as a CHL rookie. He followed that up by adding an additional 25 points to his final totals last year, a season in which he also spent some time representing Canada at the World Junior Championship. He would have gone to the U18 tournament again, too, but his Oceanic were pushing through the Q postseason. His point pace this year is putting the two previous years to shame, with 39 points through 16 games, by far the best numbers of anyone, of any age, in any CHL league. He has a pro frame and his offensive tools and instincts are unparalleled in this draft class. While he is not known for playing in the greasy areas, he never gives up on a play and has a rare ability to create – and finish – scoring chances. 

2Lucas Raymond, RW/LW, Frolunda HC, SHL – After tearing up Sweden’s U20 league last year as a 16-year-old, Raymond shone under the international spotlight, helping lead Sweden to a gold medal at the U18 tournament. Now playing men’s hockey for Frolunda, he is still able to drive the play forward with his great hands and vision. The numbers aren’t all there yet, but he is a combo goalscorer/playmaker just waiting to break out.

3. Quinton Byfield, C, Sudbury Wolves, OHL – The much heralded Byfield, two years ago the top pick in the OHL Priority Selection, is going to contend for the same honors at the NHL level next June. After a near point-per-game rookie campaign last year, he is essentially doubling that so far, with 31 points through his first 16 games. He is a dominating power forward with ideal size and skating ability, thinks the game at an advanced level, and has high end hands. 

4. Alexander Holtz, RW/LW, Djurgardens IF, SHL – Similar in developmental path to Raymond above, Holtz has been a bit more prolific in what should be his first full season playing in the SHL. Not the play driver like Raymond, he plays more of a two-way game with a killer shot and enough skill in his hands to keep defenders guessing. A bit more of a complementary player, he can nevertheless finish chances at a high rate.

5. Jamie Drysdale, D, Erie Otters, OHL – Undersized but incredibly smooth and fast on his feet, Drysdale is the highest upside blue liner for the 2020 NHL Draft, by a considerable margin, through the early going. He put up very good numbers as a rookie on a poor Erie team last year is has taken a next step so far this season. He frequently has games that suggest a future number one defender at the highest level, an impression helped along by his mate hockey sense. Is already a real candidate for Canada’s World Juniors entry as a 17-year-old. 

6. Cole Perfetti, C, Saginaw Spirit, OHL – A top three talent in some draft classes, Perfetti’s ranking here is a testament to the strong top end of the 202 draft class. A gifted scorer, he put up 37 goals as an OHL rookie last year. Despite a relatively slow start to his draft year scoring-wise, (16-5-22-27), he has above average offensive tools and is one of the smartest players in this age group, and one of the top two centers as well.

7. Tim Stutzle, F, Adler Mannheim, DEL – The easy part is recognizing his high end puck handling skills, as is his impressive edge work, and his willingness to engage physically with much older players. The hard part is determining exactly how much of that is translatable. The German league is improving, and he played a massive role in helping his native Germany earn promotion to the top flight of U18 hockey, Stutzle’s game is not directly comparable to compatriot and former teammate Moritz Seider in the sense that his skill is rarer in the German game than Seider’s mature and physical game. Uncertainties aside, the potential is special.

8. Connor Zary, C, Kamloops Blazers, WHL – One of Canada’s standouts at the 2019 U18 tournament, Zary has picked things up right where he left off in the early goings. With a September birthday, he is on the older side for a first year eligible, around two weeks older then Lafreniere. But with that maturity, comes a more mature game as well, as he plays smart at all ends of the ice, creating space for himself and his teammates through his passes and mobility. Zary also brings a lot of positive energy to the game.

9. Anton Lundell, C/LW, HIFK, Liiga – A big-bodied, versatile forward who is already in his second season in the Liiga, putting up remarkable numbers for a draft eligible player. He similarly played a strong game for Finland at the 2019 World Juniors, which they won. His success is due to a combination of plus skills and incredible offensive instincts. His speed is decent but could be so much more with added strength. Has a clear path to a top six future. 

10. Yaroslav Askarov, SKA-Neva St. Petersburg, VHL – For the doubts that I still had on Spencer Knight as the 2019 NHL Draft approached, I am more confident at this stage in the ability to Askarov to live up the glowing early reports. An incredibly athletic netminder, he tracks the puck like a ten year pro, while possessing near elite reflexes. Incredibly accomplished at the international level, he is also receiving plenty of playing time in Russia’s second men’s league, the VHL, and holding his own.

11. Marco Rossi, C, Ottawa 67s, OHL – The best prospect to come from out of Austria since Thomas Vanek, Rossi exceeded all expectations as a rookie last year, with over a point per game in both the regular seasons and the playoffs. Although on the small side, he plays a chippy game to go along with his fine wheels, and solid all-around tool set. 

12. Noel Gunler, RW/LW, Lulea HF, SHL – A clever, offensively inclined winger, Gunler is more quick than fast. He has an innate feel for finding soft spots in coverage and turning them into scoring chances. He still needs to work on his game away from the puck, but his early success in the Champions Hockey League has raised some eyebrows, despite rarely being called up to play internationally for Sweden.

13. Dylan Holloway, C, Wisconsin Badgers, Big 10 – A true freshman coming off a dominant season with Okotoks of the AJHL, Holloway has demonstrated his impressive tools in the early going for the Badgers. He brings a strong offensive presence with plus stickhandling and a more aggressive game than most in this draft class. He looks ready to burst as the skills catch up to the pace of the NCAA.

14. Ty Smilanic, LW USNTDP, USHL – This year’s USNTDP U18 class is nothing like the star class of 2018 which saw eight players taken in the first round, and all but two draft eligible drafted, there is still some very intriguing talent, and Smilanic is the most interesting of the bunch. He is a very agile skater with high end hands and he processes the game well. Was hurt to start the year and is still warming up, production-wise.

15. Hendrix Lapierre, C, Chicoutimi Saugeneens, QMJHL – Great hands and strong skating ability are united in a high end hockey brain to make Lapierre a very exciting draft prospect in the 2020 class. The top pick of the QMJHL’s 2018 Entry Draft, he is overshadowed by Alexis Lafreniere, but his contributions are still essential to Chicoutimi’s chances. A pure playmaker, he makes great reads and has plus anticipation, helping to make his linemates better. His hockey IQ also extends to the defensive end, and Lapierre is an excellent penalty killer to boot. 

16. Justin Barron, D, Halifax Mooseheads, QMJHL – A key member of last year’s QMJHL finalists, Barron is one of several understated future top four defenders in this year’s draft class. He is a good skater for his size, and he helps to shut down opposing rushes with great gap control and then he puts the Mooseheads in gear with consistently high end first passes to begin the transition. Has a good point shot, but lacks a dynamic presence in the offensive zone.

17. Justin Sourdif, C/RW, Vancouver Giants, WHL – One of the top picks in the 2017 WHL Bantam Draft, Sourdif is looking like one of the top draft prospects from the WHL for the spring of 2020. He needs to beef up, but he plays a power game, driving the net aggressively. He is a strong skater with high marks for his ability to close in on the puck, and his decision making under pressure. 

18. Kaiden Guhle, D, Prince Albert Raiders, WHL – Younger brother of Brendan Guhle of the Anaheim Ducks, Kaiden is bigger and similarly advanced as a skater. He is not a flashy presence in the offensive zone, but demonstrates great stick work and gap control and uses his strength well without being mean. That all said, he is no old-school defensive defenseman, but a player who can kickstart the counterattack with a head for the transition game.

19. Rodion Amirov, LW, Salavat Yulaev Ufa, KHL – Although he has also spent time this year in the second men’s league and the top junior league in Russia, Amirov has spent the bulk of the early season playing in the KHL. While his production there isn’t rivalling his accomplishments at last year’s U18 tournament, he is still able to show off his fast-paced offensive game, plus skating, and intriguing puck skills. His game away from the puck has not yet caught up to his game with it.

20. Emil Andrae, D, HV71 J20, SuperElit – A modern day defender who makes up in smarts what he lacks in size or strength. He reads the game like an aged pro and is a strong contributor at both ends of the ice. Despite his eye-popping early season numbers, Andrae is not gifted with jaw dropping skills, but he moves the puck very well and plays the type of game which will see him on the right side of the puck more often than not, pushing play in the right direction.

21. Seth Jarvis, RW, Portland Winterhawks, WHL – An undersized point producer, Jarvis is following up a strong rookie season in the WHL with over a point per game in his draft year. He is a dynamic player with high end vision and creativity. He can attack defenders one on one with his speed and hands, or play within a team structure. Like many players his size, he will have to show that he can stand up to the full season grind, and prove some utility off the puck.

22. Zion Nybeck, RW, HV71 J20, SuperElit – A teammate of Andrea’s with HV71’s junior program, Nybeck is even smaller than his undersized teammate. He is quick with fantastic hands, which he deploys with creativity and instincts. He will be asked to prove that he can contribute off the puck, a question that dogs most players of his stature, but the early returns are positive. 

23. Jacob Perreault, C, Sarnia Sting, OHL – The son of two-way center Yanic Perreault, Jacob looks to be following in his father’s footsteps. Although he lacks any real defining tools to advertise his game, he does everything at a solid, and promising for more, level. His high end hockey IQ will eventually allow all of his skills to play up at maturity.

24. Jake Sanderson, D, USNTDP, USHL – The son of Geoff Sanderson, the younger defenseman is also a plus skater, although not the burner his father was. He plays a very low key game, with a high panic threshold, and a great, consistent first pass out of the zone. A shutdown type, but more regularly on the penalty kill than the power play.

25. Mavrik Bourque, C, Shawinigan Cataractes, QMJHL – A high energy center with great hockey sense, Bourque overcomes his size concerns with strong skating and a feisty demeanor on the ice. The center is an offensive force, leaning more towards the finishing side of the attack than the playmaker. A committed backcheker, he wants the puck and wants to impact the game with it.

26. Jeremie Poirier, D, Saint John Sea Dogs, QMJHL – On the younger side with a June birthday, Poirier did what he could with a putrid Saint John team as a rookie last year, and while the team isn’t a big competitor yet, Poirier is excelling, with almost a point per game from the blueline so far. He has gained the confidence that he lacked last season, allowing him to lead the attack with regularity. He has demonstrated the ability to be passable away from the puck, but suffers from the occasional lapse in concentration. 

27. Braden Schneider, D, Brandon Wheat Kings, WHL – Considering his usage internationally for Team Canada at last years U18 tournament and the recent Hlinka Gretzky Cup, Schneider is not a big offensive presence, but is very much a defense first blue liner. He has a large, mature frame and skates very well, controlling things in his own zone through mature positioning, coupled with his strength. Developing his offensive game would see him move up future versions of this list.

28. Roni Hirvonen, C Assat, Liiga – Although small, Hirvonen is a skilled forward with plus instincts. Despite his age, he has been performing admirably as a 17-year-old in the Liiga. An equal opportunity shooter and playmaker, he makes up for his lack of size with plus skating and the ability to make plays at speed. After a massive Hlinka Gretzky Cup, look for more international exposure before draft day.

29. Antonio Stranges, C/LW, London Knights, OHL – So far, Stranges is more potential than production, but, to his credit, his early season numbers are heading in the right direction. You are still hoping to see more consistency as the season progresses, his puck skills are among the best in the draft class. In addition to a steadier game, he could also stand to show more assertiveness and fearlessness, while also improving his footwork to increase his chances of realizing his potential.

30. Ryan O’Rourke, D, Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds, OHL – Not the flashiest or most talented defenseman in the 2020 draft class, O’Rourke is a strong, somewhat brawny blueline rock instead. It’s not that he cannot contribute to the offensive attack, because he can, but his puck moving ability is more fitting on a second pairing than a first, or a prime powerplay slot. Still very valuable in the late first round.

31. Dawson Mercer, RW, Drummondville Voltiguers, QMJHL – After approaching one point per game last year, Mercer is stepping forward in his draft year, scoring nearly one goal per game so far. He is a great North-South skater, who plays hard at both ends and has turned himself into a useful penalty killer in addition to his killer finishing ability from the slot. His success is more a function of his hockey smarts than his innate skill set. 

Observations for all of the above are courtesy of the amazing McKeens Prospect Team. Brock Otten, OHL; Jimmy Hamrin, Sweden; Mike Sanderson, QMJHL; Vince Gibbons, WHL; Marco Bombino, Finland; Alessandro Seren Rosso, Russia.

If you’re looking for more prospect or fantasy hockey information, Rotoworld is a great resource.

Every week Michael Finewax looks ahead at the schedule and offers team-by-team notes in The Week Ahead. Ryan Dadoun writes have a weekly Fantasy Nuggets column. Gus Katsaros does an Analytics columns if you want to get into detailed statistical analysis. If you’re interested in rookies and prospects, there’s a weekly column written by writers from McKeen’s Hockey.

For more coverage of top prospects and the 2020 NHL Draft, follow @Ryan Wagman on Twitter.