2011 Stanley Cup playoffs

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PHT Decade in Review: Most significant goals in hockey

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As 2019 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at the past decade. We’ll remember the best players and teams, most significant goals, and biggest transactions that have happened since 2010. Let us know your memories in the comments.

What does everybody want? Goals! What does everybody need? Goals! What does everybody love? Goals!

From Jan. 1, 2010 through Dec. 23, 2019 there were 65,439 regular season goals scored in the NHL. The Penguins (2,425) had the most, while the Devils (1,892) had the fewest if you’re counting teams that played the entire decade (Vegas has 633 total).

While there have been tons of beautiful goals scored at various levels of hockey around the world, we wanted to hone in on the ones that meant the most. Not the prettiest, but the biggest, most significant goals of the last 10 years. Some won championships, others were the final part of a drama.

There’s lots to get to, so let’s begin.

John Carlson’s golden goal (2010 World Junior Championship)

Five days after Canada won 5-4 following a shootout in the preliminary round, the Americans got their revenge. Carlson’s overtime goal helped the U.S. win their first gold medal since 2004 and snapped Canada’s streak of six straight golds. It also began a decade of growth on the junior level for the program. U.S. teams at the World Juniors have won three gold medals since 2010 and seven medals in the last 10 tournaments.

Iggy! (2010 Winter Olympics)

Zach Parise gave the U.S. hope when he tied the game with 25 seconds left in the third period. But it was Crosby who delivered Canada gold as he called for the pass from Jarome Iginla and slid the puck by Ryan Miller for the country’s second gold medal in three Olympic Games. 

How much did the goal resonate? Crosby’s stick, gloves, the puck, and the net used in the game at GM Place were put on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.

Patrick Kane‘s disappearing shot (2010 Stanley Cup Final)

At first only three people inside Wachovia Center — Kane, Patrick Sharp and Nick Boynton — knew the location of the puck. The rest of their Blackhawks teammates, the Flyers, including goaltender Michael Leighton, and the closest official had no idea, until upon closer inspection it was discovered a goal had been scored and the Blackhawks were Stanley Cup champions.

Alex Burrows slays the dragon (2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

The Canucks had their Stanley Cup dreams ended in Round 2 two consecutive playoffs at the hands of the Blackhawks. Both the 2009 and 2010 series ended in six games, but the third time would be the charm for Vancouver and Burrows would be the hero. Chris Campoli’s clearance was blocked by Burrows, who then fled into the Chicago zone and fired a rocket by Antti Niemi, earning himself the “dragon slayer” nickname.

Bergeron completes the comeback vs. Maple Leafs (2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

The Maple Leafs were looking good up 4-1 midway through the third period of Game 7 against the Bruins and eyeing their first playoff series win in nine years. But then it all fell apart. Nathan Horton cut the lead to 4-2 with 10:42 to go and a wild final two minutes in the third period ended with Milan Lucic and Patrice Bergeron scoring 31 seconds apart to force overtime.

In the extra period it was Bergeron again completing the dramatic comeback to send the Maple Leafs home and the Bruins on a path to the Stanley Cup Final.

Gone in 17 seconds (2013 Stanley Cup Final)

A few weeks after their series win over the Maple Leafs, the Bruins were on the other end of a dramatic comeback, one that would end their season. Boston held a 2-1 lead late in Game 6, hoping to hang on and force a Game 7 in Chicago. With the Blackhawks’ net empty, it was Brian Bickell tying the game with 1:16 to play. As many were preparing to see overtime, Bolland had other ideas as 17 seconds later he pounced on a rebound in front to send the Blackhawks to a second Cup win in four years.

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The T.J. Oshie Show (2014 Winter Olympics)

There was no medal on the line. The only meaning to the game was that the winner avoided the qualification round. A shootout was needed and the U.S. turned to T.J. Oshie, who scored on four of his six attempts to help the Americans beat Russia 3-2.

The game took place in the early hours of a Saturday morning in the U.S., and the reactions from around the country of fans who gathered in local bars to watch showed the impact of the victory. (It also provided us with this amazing photo.)

Poulin shatters American dreams again (2014 Winter Olympics)

The U.S. should have claimed gold. Up 2-1 with under two minutes to play, Kelli Stack’s shot toward an empty net clanked off the post and gave Canada life. Thirty-one seconds later Marie-Philip Poulin broke the Americans’ hearts for the first time that day, tying the game with 54.6 seconds left. She did it again in overtime to continue Canada’s gold medal run at the Olympics.

This wasn’t the first time Philip-Poulin shattered American dreams. Four years earlier she scored both goals to lead her country to gold over the U.S. at the Vancouver Games.

Martinez the Cup winning King (2014 Stanley Cup Final)

One overtime wasn’t enough for the Kings and Rangers, who settled the 2014 Cup Final with a second extra period. With the Kings leading the series 3-1, the fans inside Staples Center were chanting We Want the Cup! and Martinez, who scored the overtime winner in Game 7 of the Western Conference Final, delivered leading a rush into the Rangers’ zone and burying a feed from Tyler Toffoli to help franchise capture its first championship.

Islanders finally advance to Round 2 (2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

The eighth time was the charm. Since the spring of 1993 when David Volek shattered Pittsburgh’s three-peat dreams and the Islanders reached the conference final, the franchise could not find a way out of the first round of the playoffs. But a second consecutive 100-point season was boosted by captain Tavares’ double overtime wraparound to get the monkey off their backs.

Kunitz keeps Penguins’ back-to-back dreams alive (2017 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

It was a goal that sent two franchises in two different directions. Kunitz’s goal sent the Penguins to the Cup Final that season, which they could win in six games over the Predators to give the NHL back-to-back champs for the first time in two decades. The goal also ended a memorable run by the Senators, who topped the Bruins and Rangers to reach the Eastern Conference Final for the first time since 2007. Since that night, Ottawa has failed to make the playoffs, failed to reach 67 points and win more than 28 games in a season. They also said goodbye to players like Mark Stone, Erik Karlsson, Kyle Turris, Mike Hoffman, Ryan Dzingel, and Derick Brassard, among others.

Oops, I did it again (2018 Winter Olympics)

Her sister, Monique Lamoureux-Morando, forced overtime, so to keep it a family affair, Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson helped the U.S. women earn their first Olympic gold medal since 1998 with the shootout winner. The move was six years in the making and ended Canada’s streak of four straight Olympic golds.

Kuznetsov’s winner exorcises demons (2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

It seemed like the Capitals were never going to win the Stanley Cup unless they beat the Penguins. They hadn’t topped their old rivals in seven straight playoff series dating back to 1994, but this one felt different. The back-and-forth series finally came to an end when Evgeny Kuznetsov slipped the puck five-hole on Matt Murray, sending Washington on a path that would end with its first championship.

The game had it all (2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

After blowing a 3-1 series lead the Golden Knights were up 3-1 on the Sharks in Game 7 and things were looking good. But then Cody Eakin cross-checked Joe Pavelski, who fell awkwardly and hit his head on the ice, causing the game to stop for several minutes. Eakin was given a major penalty and game misconduct, opening the door for the San Jose power play to score four times in four minutes to completely alter the game. In overtime, Barclay Goodrow made the SAP Center roof fly off with the winning goal to send the Sharks to Round 2.

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Maroon’s goal cues Play Gloria! (2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs)

It was fitting that the St. Louisan returns home on a one-year deal and scores one of the biggest goals of the season. Round 2, Game 7 against the Dallas Stars and it was Maroon who played hero inside Enterprise Center. The goal set off wild celebrations on the ice and and in the bowels of the arena as the Laura Branigan song Gloria played over and over. Thirty-six days later the Blues would win their first Cup to kick off a summer of partying.

MORE PHT DECADE IN REVIEW FUN:
• Top NHL players in fantasy hockey
• Best players of the decade
• Favorite goals, best/worst jerseys
Best NHL teams of the decade
Biggest NHL trades

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

A look back at the last time Stanley Cup Final needed a Game 7

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The Boston Bruins won’t have to look far down the bench for a couple of their Game 7 heroes from their 2011 Stanley Cup winning team.

In fact, Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand line up on the same line for the B’s, who will contest the 17th Game 7 in Cup Final history at TD Garden on Wednesday night (8 p.m. ET, NBC; Live Stream).

They’re two of five Bruins players (Zdeno Chara, David Krejci and Tuukka Rask) who remain on the team that played in the last Cup Final that needed to be decided by a Game 7, and between them, scored all four goals Boston needed to end a 39-year Stanley Cup drought with their sixth championship.

Looking back, there are some similarities stemming from that series eight years ago. First and foremost, the Bruins needed to rebound from a 3-2 series deficit to even get to that stage.

Trailing a strong Vancouver Canucks team, the Bruins put forth a five-goal effort in a 5-2 win at home in Game 6. That game was highlighted by a four-goal first period, one that came in a span of 4:14. The Bruins chased then-Canucks netminder Roberto Luongo for the second time in the series.

A mouth-watering Game 7 matchup back in Vancouver was further intensified after a total of 54 penalty minutes were dished out in the third period alone, including four 10-minute misconducts.

Let’s take a look back.

First period

The Canucks took it to the Bruins early, with Tim Thomas — the eventual Conn Smythe winner — making a couple of saves that otherwise could have changed the whole complexion of the game.

Then a rookie, Marchand was able to get to a puck off a Canucks faceoff win in their own zone. A couple of turns and some suspect defending by Sami Salo created some space between for Marchand, who slid the puck into the slot. The pass was met by the stick of Bergeron, who swatted his stick at it. The puck rolled back Luongo’s right leg, unbeknownst to the Canucks netminder, to give the Bruins a 1-0 lead at the 14:37 mark.

Second Period

The Bruins would effectively end the game in the middle frame, scoring twice in just over five minutes.

Before that, though, Chara made a crucial block on Alex Burrows shot that got past a sprawling Thomas but not the big man standing behind him.

Marchand nearly doubled the lead earlier just over a minute in when he raised a puck up and over Luongo but couldn’t beat the post.

Marchand wouldn’t be denied, however, and was rewarded with his first goal of the night on a nifty wraparound and a fair bit of self-inflicted goaltender interference by Daniel Sedin at 12:13.

Oh, and Luongo doing himself dirty by knocking the puck into his own net.

Bergeron’s second would come shorthanded, a dagger of sorts for the Canucks.

Gregory Campbell won the draw in the defensive zone for the Bruins and Dennis Seidenberg slammed the puck down the boards. The puck took a funny hop off the glass, falling into the path of Patrice Bergeron who was gifted a partial breakaway.

With Christian Ehrhoff draped all over him, and a penalty pending against the Canucks, Bergeron somehow guided the puck past Luongo. The goal was reviewed, with the Canucks arguing that Bergeron had put the puck in with his glove.

In the words of the great Maury, “That was a lie.”

Third period

The Canucks threw 16 shots at Thomas in the final period, looking desperately for any morsel of momentum in front of a packed Rogers Arena.

Thomas wouldn’t be felled, however, posting a 37-save shutout. Thomas made an excelled save off a streaking Sedin at the midway point of the period to preserve the goose egg. He’d stop Jannik Hansen point-blank with fewer than five minutes left in the game.

Desperate, and with just over three minutes left, the Alain Vigneault would pull Luongo for the extra skater.

The 4-0 goal would come on a clear from the Canucks that landed at the feet of Burrows. Burrows, who bit Bergeron in Game 1 of the series and fought Thomas in Game 4, couldn’t handle the quasi-pass and Marchand was more than happy to cap off his three-point night with his second goal, this time into the empty net.

Chara lifts the Cup

The drought was over.

The Bruins were Stanley Cup champs for the sixth time in franchise history.

Chara’s first pass of the Cup? That went to a Mark Recchi, who won his third Cup in his final NHL season.

Aftermath

The ugliness of 1994’s riots in the streets of Vancouver after the Canucks lost the Cup to the New York Rangers returned 17 years later.

Rioters poured into the streets of downtown Vancouver following the game and all hell broke loose.

The Bruins would make it home safely, with the parade held a couple days later.

Perhaps the best part of that victory march down the streets of Boston was Marchand showing the world he couldn’t rap.

MORE BLUES-BRUINS:
• Bruins push Stanley Cup Final to Game 7 by beating Blues
Blues, Cardinals team up to offer Busch Stadium Game 7 viewing party
Win or lose the Conn Smythe should belong to Rask 
• St. Louis newspaper gets roasted for ‘jinxing’ Blues before Game 6
Bounce back Blues need one more rally


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Sharks clip Wings

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From Apr. 1-10, ProHockeyTalk will be counting down the Top 10 moments from the 2011 postseason.

Here’s No. 5 — San Jose avoiding an epic collapse to beat Detroit in Game 7, advancing to its second-straight Western Conference final.

After the Vancouver Canucks nearly blew a 3-0 series lead in their opening round matchup with Chicago, most figured it would be a cautionary tale — that the next team to build a seemingly insurmountable lead would learn from Vancouver, and not let the opponent hang around.

The San Jose Sharks didn’t get the memo.

After racing out to a three games to none lead on Detroit in Round 2, the Sharks proceeded to drop three in a row — 4-3, 4-3 and 3-1 — setting up a dramatic Game 7 at HP Pavilion.

Stress the word “dramatic”:

In the end, it was Patrick Marleau scoring the game-winner to push San Jose to its second Western Conference finals in as many years. A fitting hero, given Marleau was called “gutless” by Jeremy Roenick following Game 5.

“For him to end up with the winning goal was pretty special for our team and for him,” coach Todd McLellan said. “I think the monkey may be off his back for the next series. … He was a difference maker tonight.”

More:

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Burrows buries Blackhawks

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Philly stays alive

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Roloson turns back the clock…and the Penguins

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Preds win! Preds win!

Top 10 2011 Playoff Moments: Horton beats the Habs

PHT Predicts: Penguins vs. Lightning – Who do you have?

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All right so there’s probably not going to be any Sidney Crosby and there definitely won’t be Evgeni Malkin, but the Penguins have Jordan Staal and Marc-Andre Fleury still and they did nearly win the Atlantic Division. They’ll be matched up against the phenomenal Steve Stamkos, diminutive star Martin St. Louis, and the venerable Vincent Lecavalier in the first round of the Eastern Conference playoffs.

With Fleury matching up against Dwayne Roloson for Tampa Bay and the Lightning bringing the bulk of the star power in this series, we’re left wondering just who you’ve got in this series. Here’s how we’re looking at things.

James says:
The Penguins have been impressive and resilient this season, but I just don’t know if they can grind out four wins against the Lightning. Only the Vancouver Canucks scored more power play goals than the Lightning in 2010-11 while Pittsburgh is all the way in 19th place. My guess is that the Bolts will get some crucial “easy” goals on the man advantage and will use their superior scoring depth against the star-starved Penguins.

Is Marc-Andre Fleury so superior to Dwayne Roloson that Pittsburgh can overcome those disparities? I’ll guess that the answer is “No.”

It’s the Lightning in 6, while Martin St. Louis stands up and asks, “So why exactly don’t I get Hart Trophy attention? Are voters Heightists or something?”

Matt says:
In one corner we have a team that has been through the battles—on the other, we have a team that has two players who have won a cup and a line-up full of youngsters.  I’m a big believer in the idea that a team has to learn how to play in the playoffs and this looks like it could be a learning experience for a lot of the guys in Tampa Bay.  The Penguins went to the Cup Finals two seasons in a row until last season—when a weak defensive corps couldn’t hang when the games got tougher in the playoffs.  Paul Martin and Zbynek Michalek should fix that; the Pens will be able to sneak by on the strength of their defensive game this time.

The Lightning will learn lessons for next year, but Penguins in 5.

Joe says:
Tampa has the dangerous offense and the streaky goalie. Pittsburgh has the stingy, rugged defense and the playoff-tested lights out goalie. I like a lot of what Tampa Bay has but I don’t know that they can hang with the Penguins in what should be a knockdown, drag-out series. Penguins in 7.

What say you faithful PHT readers? Think we’re playing favorites with the Pens or downplaying the Lightning? Vote in our poll and let us know.

Sideshow Bobrovsky: Flyers goalie shows off new Simpsons-inspired mask for playoffs

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While most players are busy growing out the playoff beard for the postseason (unless you’re Patrick Kane, then it’s time for the mullet) Flyers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky is new to the whole NHL playoffs thing. While the rookie goalie had a huge year in leading Philadelphia to the Atlantic Division title and the two seed in the Eastern Conference, finding a new way to show off for the playoffs can be difficult.

For a goalie, changing up the mask can be a sign of trying to change your luck or mixing up your superstitions, but Bobrovsky is going in another direction for inspiration. He’s going with Sideshow Bob. The tormentor of Bart Simpson adorns one side of Bobrovsky’s new lid just in time for the playoffs and as CSN Philly’s Sarah Baicker showed us on Twitter, it’s truly a glorious sight to behold.

Bobrovsky’s new mask also shows off Philadelphia folk hero Rocky Balboa on the other side adorned in the US flag, arms raised like the champion he was (belt or no belt) in six five movies. (Rocky V never happened, you hear me?!)

Going with Rocky on the helmet is obviously a nod to Philadelphia in itself but we’re just a little disappointed that the Russian netminder didn’t sneak in some love for Ivan Drago in Rocky IV just for fun. After all, this is the guy who had a fighter jet on his mask during the regular season, so why not just go all out with the sweaty, menacing mug of Dolph Lungdren as well?

As it stands, the only thing getting in the way of Bobrovsky now is either Apollo Creed or many carefully placed rakes. We’re thinking he doesn’t have to worry about any of those finding their way on the ice. Fortunately for Bobrovsky, there’s no one named Bartholomew on the Sabres to pester him in the first round of the playoffs.

(Thanks to Sarah Baicker from CSN Philly for sharing the photos via Twitter.)