The Buzzer: Nolan Patrick Kane

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Three Stars

1. Nolan Patrick

Nolan Patrick joins Patrick Kane (free commenter handle: Nolan Patrick Kane?) as the two skaters who generated four points on Monday. The struggling sophomore gets the nod for two reasons 1) it allows this to be a joint award with James van Riemsdyk, one of two players who generated a hat trick with the help of an empty-netter, and 2) Patrick’s Flyers won, while Kane’s Blackhawks somehow lost.

Patrick, 20, scored two goals and two assists, generating a +4 rating. He only needed two shots on goal, so he really had the touch on Monday.

No, like, he really had the touch.

JVR is heating up after what’s been a very tough half-season returning to the Flyers. This hat trick extends his multi-point streak to three games, where he’s generated five goals and two assists for seven points. Patrick and JVR are two players the Flyers expected a lot more from in 2018-19, so if both can turn things around heading into 2019-20, it would be a real moral boost for management (especially since it’s tough to imagine the team trading either forward away at or before the deadline).

2. Patrick Kane

Like Patrick, Kane generated two goals and two assists on Monday. Even in defeat, the Blackhawks would have been silly to expect anything more from Kane, who fired nine SOG and had a +2 rating.

Kane has only failed to score a point in one game since Dec. 14, and that was the 2019 Winter Classic (so you can try to manufacture and “indoor point streak” if you’re feeling strange). During this current actual point streak, 88 has five goals and nine assists for 14 points in six contests. He’s now at a whopping 64 points in 47 games in 2018-19.

3. Carl Soderberg

Two players generated hat tricks of two goals plus an empty-netter on Monday: JVR and Soderberg. Soderberg’s hat trick included the game-winning goal, giving him a slight advantage.

The Swede’s shorthanded goal was an impressive showing of willpower. He finished the night with a +2 rating and five SOG.

Check out his hat trick as a part of these highlights, which also includes Mikko Rantanen making everyone look bad, as he’s wont to do.

Other Highlights of the Night

Pretty nifty combination of hand-eye coordination from Jeff Petry on Montreal’s OT GWG:

That game also included a hefty fight, if you’re into that sort of thing.

Maybe a rare goal where Connor McDavid doesn’t “make it look easy,” … although, he kinda sorta still does make it easy, doesn’t he? Either way, you can’t really blame him for smiling:

Factoids

By the way, Andreychuk leads the power-play goal category all-time with 274. Meanwhile, Shanahan ranks 13th in NHL history with 656 goals. Nice symmetry there.

Scores

COL 6 – TOR 3
NJD 8 – CHI 5
PHI 7 – MIN 4
STL 4 – WSH 1
MTL 3 – BOS 2 (OT)
EDM 7 – BUF 2

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Maple Leafs hoping core players will take less money

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As of Wednesday evening there were still two restricted free agents sitting at home away from their teams in need of a new contract.

In Anaheim, the Ducks have yet to come to terms on a new deal with forward Nick Ritchie, while the Toronto Maple Leafs are in the same position with star forward William Nylander.

With all due respect to Ritchie, who is a decent enough young player with a solid future in the league, Nylander is the player that everyone is watching. Not only because he is the superior talent, but because he is one of the game’s brightest young stars that also happens to be a cornerstone piece for a team that is supposed to be one of the odds on favorites to win the Stanley Cup. That team is also based in Toronto.

The issue between the two sides seems to be the same one that always exists between team and player when these situations (a restricted free agent with no arbitration rights) arise: Bridge deal vs. Long-term deal, and the team’s willingness to invest in a young player.

Toronto is in a complicated position right now because it enters the season with more than $12 million in salary cap space — even after signing John Tavares to a seven-year, $77 million contract over the summer — and is going to have to pay all of its young core players significant raises over the next year.

Nylander is a restricted free agent this season, while Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner will find themselves in the exact same position after the season.

None of them will be cheap, and all of that extra salary cap space will quickly start to disappear.

On Wednesday, just hours before the start of their season opening game against the Montreal Canadiens, team president Brendan Shanahan talked about the program the Maple Leafs have going on right now and how he hopes their core players might be willing to take somewhat of a hometown discount to stay in Toronto.

He referenced his experiences from his playing days in Detroit where the team was able to build an annual powerhouse around the same core of players.

“I can speak from personal experience, that when I get together with some of my old mates from the Cup years in Detroit we talk about winning together and growing together and that’s what we remember looking back,” said Shanahan on Wednesday.

He continued: “At the end of the day we all found a way to fit with each other so we could keep adding to the group. That’s obviously what we are asking some of our young leaders to do. There is a lot of other voices, and understandably so … it’s not for everyone, we’re not for everyone, but we think the players we currently have, while it’s not going to be easy, we have great confidence that they have bought into being a part of this program, and being a part of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and representing Toronto in a way that they understand what is going to be most important. What I hope they can look back on 20 years, 30 years down the road and is going to be most important to them, is whether or not they maxed out as an individual and as a team and have championships to look back on and remember fondly.”

He also made reference to Tavares turning down less money from other teams (San Jose reportedly offered more money than the $11 million per year Toronto offered) and how, “he is still doing very, very well financially,” and that  “it wasn’t his responsibility to set a new bar or please other people with other interests. He’s a hockey player. He wanted to come here and win hockey games.”

The message there seems to be very clear to Nylander, Matthews, and Marner: Take less money for the betterment of the team so the team can win.

Obviously, this is the approach one might expect from management in professional sports. They are aways going to try and get their players for a cheaper price, especially in a salary capped league where they only have a set amount of money to spend when building the roster.

Still, there are some issues here, especially with Shanahan’s memories about his playing days in Detroit. While it may be true that he and his teammates played for less money than some other stars around the league, the Red Wings were routinely one of the highest salaried teams in the league. It was also a non-capped era so it really didn’t matter what they made to anyone except for the people signing the checks. They could have — and probably should have — gotten even more.

Also: Tavares is from Toronto which gave the Maple Leafs a unique advantage when it came to luring him there for less than what he could have had elsewhere. That is not always going to work in free agency.

But even when taking into account the difference in era, why does the onus fall on the star players to take less money in this situation to help the team? Players in all professional sports have an extremely short window for maximum earning potential, and you should not blame them for wanting to take advantage of that and cash in when they can.

There is also this point from TSN analyst and former NHL player Ray Ferraro that should not be overlooked:

It reminds me of how Connor McDavid took a little less money annually to allow the Oilers to have some “wiggle room” under the salary cap.

The Oilers rewarded him by trading Jordan Eberle, the team’s best right winger, after giving a few extra million and a few more years to the likes of Kris Russell and Milan Lucic.

So … thanks, Connor?

The belief from my corner has always been that even in a salary capped league like the NHL you have to keep your stars and you have to keep them happy, even if it means dedicating significant salary cap resources to a small number of players. The idea that you can not win with that sort of roster construction is completely unfounded because almost every Stanley Cup winning team in the salary cap era has been built in such a manner.

If that means constantly trimming around the edges and always retooling your depth, the so be it. It is a heck of a lot easier to find third-and fourth-liners and second-and third-pairing defenders than it is to find another Auston Matthews or William Nylander.

There is no doubt that a lot of star players around the league have taken below market contracts, and if that is what they want to do, they are well within their rights to do that if they so choose. But it should not be the expectation, and their commitment to being part of a winning team should not be judged for not being willing to do it (especially when recent history shows it will not negatively impact the team’s chances of winning — if it knows what it is doing). If you’re a star, get paid like one, because as Ferraro pointed out your team may not correctly use that money you left them on the table, and they will not look out for you when they feel it is time to move on for any reason.

If the team can treat it like a business, so can the player.

MORE: Your 2018-19 NHL on NBC TV schedule

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Video: PHT Extra — Fights, trades expected to be discussed at GM meetings

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On Thursday, Brough and I looked ahead to next week’s NHL GM meetings and discussed the two (likely) major topics at hand — fighting, and trades.

On the first topic, we discussed what might be done in the wake of Ray Emery jumping Braden Holtby.

After NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said he didn’t “think anybody liked it,” and NHL discipline czar Brendan Shanahan said he hated it, it stands to reason some adjustments might be made — like, as we suggest, using “heightened sensitivity” on the already-existing aggressor rule, much like how the NHL used “heightened sensitivity” with regards to goaltender protection following the Milan Lucic-Ryan Miller incident of 2011.

On the second topic, we looked at two teams in desperate need of goaltending: Edmonton and the New York Islanders.

Will GMs Craig MacTavish and Garth Snow use next week’s meetings as an opportunity to kick the tires on a new netminder?

Go on, have a watch:

No suspension for Malkin after verbally abusing official

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Pittsburgh forward Evgeni Malkin won’t face any additional discipline for getting in the face of officials after a 5-2 loss to Toronto on Wednesday night.

Rob Rossi of the Tribune-Review reports Malkin has escaped suspension after receiving a game misconduct for verbal abuse of an official, called after the final horn blew.

Malkin was furious with a series of calls from the crew of referees Ghislain Hebert and Kelly Sutherland, and linesmen David Brisebois and Shane Heyer.

Pittsburgh was whistled for 10 penalties, including a stretch in the second period where the Pens were dinged four times in the first 12 minutes.

“I‘m really mad at a couple [of] calls,” Malkin said on Thursday. “But…I lose control. It was bad emotion. It was my fault.”

Pens captain Sidney Crosby also got in on the critique, earning himself an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty with two minutes left in the game. Toronto scored on the ensuring power play.

It’s not overly surprising that Hebert was at the center of an officiating controversy, given his history:

Last December, Chicago head coach Joel Quenneville called Hebert’s work in a game vs. LA “tough to watch.”

In February, interim Canadiens coach Randy Cunneyworth said Hebert missing a hooking call on Erik Cole was “a little beyond comprehension for me.”

Hebert was one of the referees working the infamous Bruins-Sabres game when Milan Lucic ran over Ryan Miller.

Notes:

— Malkin also got dinged for an abuse of officials misconduct while playing in the KHL during the lockout.

— No word yet if a fine will be levied against Malkin. Last season, NHL discipline czar Brendan Shanahan seemed to hand out fines for comments made after (or, before) games, rather than in the heat of the moment.

Also, almost all the fines for criticizing officials were levied against coaches.

Joe Corvo is bummed out that Kyle Turris didn’t want to fight

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While the Bruins lost a tough one to Ottawa last night 1-0, the game’s other storyline didn’t come to fruition either.

After getting lit up by Kyle Turris in their last meeting, Joe Corvo talked a lot about how he was going to get him for it. Corvo backed off of that declaration saying he had “foot-in-mouth” disease but it’s not as if Corvo would turn down the chance to settle the score.

While Turris said he’d defend himself if he had to, his teammates weren’t about to let that happen. Corvo asked about a fight during the game and was given the expected response by the Senators as Joe Haggerty of CSNNE.com found out.

“His teammates said he wasn’t going to fight me, so that’s it,” said Corvo, who also added Brendan Shanahan to his cast of recurring characters. “I wasn’t going to be the idiot chasing him around.”

That’s probably all for the best for Corvo because making statements saying you’re going to give a guy some payback is an easy way to land on the NHL’s radar for a suspension. Instead, Corvo had to settle for seeing Milan Lucic lay a big hit on Turris during the game to make up for it.