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Chris Chelios leaving Red Wings to be closer to family in Chicago

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DETROIT (AP) — Chris Chelios is leaving the Detroit Red Wings to return to his hometown of Chicago.

Chelios spent a decade with the Red Wings as a player from 1999-2009, and he’s also been an adviser for the team. His Hall of Fame career as a defenseman started in Montreal before he spent eight years with the Blackhawks.

”For me, this is an opportunity to move back to Chicago to be closer to family, and in particular my mother,” Chelios said Thursday. ”I began to seriously consider moving home last February after the passing of my father. Now that my children have all graduated, it seems like the ideal time for my wife, Tracee, and I to make the move.”

Chelios was traded to Detroit in March 1999 and he remained with the Red Wings through the 2008-09 season before finishing his career with a brief stint with Atlanta in 2009-10.

”I’ve thoroughly enjoyed being a part of the Red Wings organization over the last 19 years,” Chelios said. ”Admittedly, I was skeptical about the 1999 trade that brought me to Detroit. As a Chicago guy who was playing for the Blackhawks at the time, we despised those Detroit teams of the 1990s. After the trade, however, things changed quickly and I began to feel right at home.”

Chelios and the Red Wings won Stanley Cups in 2002 and 2008.

”What an unbelievable experience, playing on some of the greatest teams in league history, with some of the greatest players of all-time,” Chelios said. ”I consider myself extremely lucky to have been a part of it all. The Cup-winning teams in 2002 and 2008 are the obvious highlights, but I’m grateful for every chance I had to put on a Red Wings sweater.”

Chelios’ son Jake is a defenseman as well and is in the Red Wings’ organization.

For more AP NHL coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey

Police: Drowning of NHL goalie Ray Emery not suspicious

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HAMILTON, Ontario (AP) — The drowning of former NHL goalie Ray Emery does not appear suspicious, police said.

The 35-year-old player whose career spanned 11 seasons drowned in Hamilton Harbour on Sunday.

He jumped off a boat near the Leander Boat Club to go swimming, and friends called emergency services at about 6 a.m. when he didn’t resurface, police said. Inspector Marty Schulenberg called it a ”case of misadventure.”

Emery’s body was found at about 2:50 p.m. Sunday, about 20 yards from where he went into the water, Schulenberg added. He said first responders were not able to locate Emery right away so they called the dive unit. The search took longer than anticipated because of concerns for the dive team.

”It’s a lengthy process and safety is paramount to our divers,” he said. ”We need to take the time do it safely and that’s what the delay was.”

A post-mortem was to be completed Monday.

”Mr. Emery was taking a swim this morning and the circumstances around that are a part of the investigation,” Schulenberg said. ”Those details remain to be uncovered by our investigators.”

Emery played for Ottawa, Chicago and Philadelphia. He helped the Senators reach the Stanley Cup Final in 2007 and won it as a backup with the Blackhawks in 2013.

The Blackhawks lauded him as a ”fierce competitor, a good teammate and a Stanley Cup champion.” Flyers President Paul Holmgren cited his ”talent, work ethic and determination,” calling him an ”outstanding teammate and an extremely gifted goaltender.”

Emery battled avascular necrosis, the same serious hip ailment that ended two-sport star Bo Jackson’s career. He and fellow Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford combined to win the William Jennings Trophy for allowing the league’s fewest goals during the lockout-shortened 2013 season and finished seventh in Vezina Trophy voting.

Emery played in 326 NHL regular-season and playoff games. He went 145-86-28 with a 2.70 goals-against average and 16 shutouts.

He faced issues off the ice, including an incident of road rage, assault of a trainer in Russia and behavior that led to his dismissal from Ottawa’s training camp.

”Ray had many highs and lows in his personal life and his career,” longtime agent J.P. Barry said. ”He never let things that would derail most of us stop his forward momentum. He had a big heart and a fun loving personality. He was someone we all rooted for to succeed.”

Toronto Maple Leafs general manager Kyle Dubas knew Emery from junior hockey and the American Hockey League. He said Emery’s ”smile and intelligence made him a magnetic personality.”

Emery played in a charity hockey game Saturday night organized by Zac Rinaldo of the Nashville Predators. After word of his death spread, condolences poured in.

”I will always remember Ray as a good person first & foremost,” friend and former teammate Dan Carcillo wrote on Twitter. ”I envied his demeanor. He had a contagious personality.”

Former teammates pointed to Emery’s mentorship and leadership, especially in his final professional season in the AHL in 2015-16. Enforcer-turned-analyst Paul Bissonnette, a teammate with the AHL’s Ontario Reign, said Emery would treat other players to dinner almost every night.

”I’d heard nothing but great things before meeting him,” Bissonnette said. ”And it was true.”

AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno and The Canadian Press contributed to this report.

Judge: No class-action status for ex-NHLer concussion case

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ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The federal judge overseeing the NHL concussion case has denied class-action status for the former players suing the league over head injuries.

U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson issued her 46-page order on Friday, the first significant victory for the league in a landmark lawsuit that was filed almost five years ago.

Nelson wrote that ”widespread differences” in state laws about medical monitoring, which the retired players are seeking, would ”present significant case management difficulties.”

The judge declined to certify either of the proposed classes by the ex-players. They sought to create one group of all living former NHL players and one group of all retired players diagnosed with a neurological disease, disorder or condition. Had they succeeded, more than 5,000 former players would have been allowed to join the case.

The last hearing on the class-action status was held in March in Nelson’s courtroom in St. Paul.

More than 100 former players have added their names to the case. The retirees have accused the NHL of failing to better prevent head trauma or warn players of such risks while promoting violent play that led to their injuries.

An attorney for the players, Charles Zimmerman, said Friday the judge’s ruling was procedural, and that the hundreds of players are prepared to try their cases individually. Zimmerman said it was too soon to know if there would be an appeal.

Nelson previously issued two significant rulings against the league. In 2015, she denied a motion to dismiss the lawsuit on the sufficiency of the allegations. The following year, she rejected a motion to dismiss the case for labor law pre-emption, on the argument that the collective bargaining agreement between the NHL and its players supersedes the court.

For more AP NHL coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey

Ekman-Larsson poised to lead Coyotes into the future

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Arizona defenseman Oliver Ekman-Larsson knew the desert was where he wanted to stay, yet consulted with former Coyotes captain Shane Doan before signing a long-term extension.

Doan had been in similar situations before, debating whether to stay in the only place he had ever played or head off someplace else for more money or a better chance at winning the Stanley Cup.

Doan kept true to the Coyotes throughout his career, spending his entire 21-year career with the same franchise, yet didn’t try to sway his former teammate one way or another during a 20-minute call.

”I just asked how he looked at when he was playing, so that helped me a lot,” Ekman-Larsson said. ”It was really nice to have a guy who had been in the same situation a little bit. He didn’t say what I was going to do. You should just do what’s best for you and what you’re feeling comfortable with. After that phone call, it felt great to agree on the long term.”

The long term was an eight-year contract extension signed last week that will pay Ekman-Larsson an average of $8.25 million per year. The 26-year-old Swede may have been able to command more money on the open market when his current contract expires after the 2018-19 season, but dollar signs were not what he was after.

Stability, comfortable surroundings and a hope for the future was what Ekman-Larsson sought. The Coyotes are the only team he’s played for and they have a roster filled with up-and-coming players, so it was the only natural fit in his mind.

”It’s only money. It’s not going to make you happier, so the money situation was never a problem,” Ekman-Larsson said. ”I didn’t even think about it. I’m just happy to be a part of this team and this community and the future.”

Since reaching the 2012 Western Conference Finals, the Coyotes have regressed, becoming one of the NHL’s worst teams. They’ve been in rebuilding mode since that run but appear to be on the road to becoming a playoff-contending team again with a slew of moves and draft picks by general manager John Chayka.

Locking up Ekman-Larsson for the long term keeps a key, veteran piece to the puzzle in place, providing the Coyotes with leadership and rarely matched skill from the blue line.

”It’s a huge moment for our entire organization. Our fans should be proud, our ownership should be proud, our staff and everyone involved,” Chayka said after Ekman-Larsson’s signing. ”A superstar-caliber player has the option to go to maybe any of the 31 teams and felt the loyalty and felt the belief enough in what we’re doing to sign on long term. He’s a leader on and off the ice and a special person, a special player.”

Since being taken with the sixth overall pick of the 2009 NHL draft, Ekman-Larsson has established himself as one of the NHL’s most skilled defensemen. He has eclipsed 20 goals twice during eight NHL seasons and is annually among the league leaders in assists by a defenseman, finishing with at least 19 each of the past seven seasons.

Ekman-Larsson got the 2017-18 season off to a slow start, with eight goals and 22 assists the first four months while posting the league’s worst plus/minus rating.

The start came with extenuating circumstances.

Not only was he playing in a new system for a new coach in Rick Tocchet, Ekman-Larsson was still trying to come to grips with the death of his mother, Annika. She battled cancer for 10 years before succumbing and he missed the final three games of the 2016-17 season to be with his family. The weight of her death carried into the start of the 2017-18 season.

”Obviously, losing your mom is something I will have to live with the rest of my life,” he said. ”It’s not going to take one year, it’s not going to take 10 years, it’s something I’m going to have with me until I die. There’s days that you feel better about it and there’s days where you’re feeling sad about it, so it’s up and down a little bit. It’s OK to be that way, but at the same time it helps to do what I love doing, being around my teammates and great people. That’s something I really appreciate.”

Ekman-Larsson played better at the end of last season as he understood Tocchet’s system more, finishing with 14 goals and 28 assists while playing all 82 games. He expects the comfort level to increase for the upcoming season – and beyond, now that he has a long-term contract in place.

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey

Red Wings agree with Mantha on two-year, $6.6 million contract

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DETROIT — The Detroit Red Wings have agreed to a two-year, $6.6 million contract with Anthony Mantha.

The Red Wings announced the move with the restricted free agent Wednesday, keeping the 23-year-old wing after he led the team with 24 goals last season.

Mantha had 48 points in 80 games last season. He has 43 goals and 44 assists in two-plus seasons with the Red Wings. Detroit drafted him 20th overall in 2013.

The Red Wings re-signed restricted free agent Andreas Athanasiou last year with a two-year contract.

Their next task is completing negotiations with restricted free agent Dylan Larkin on a multiyear contract.