NBCSports.com

NBC

NBC Sports’ ‘Lunch Talk Live’ daily show debuts Monday

NBC Sports will be debuting a new daily sports talk show called Lunch Talk Live featuring host Mike Tirico this Monday, April 6 at 12 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

Tirico, who will host the show remotely, will be joined by special guests, including current and former athletes, NBC Sports’ lineup of on-air commentators, and other prominent voices and figures within sports and media.

On Lunch Talk Live Tirico and guests will focus on the current state of the sports world and the impact of the coronavirus pandemic

“In these challenging times, we are all missing sports and the people who make sports memories,” said Tirico. “Hopefully, we can bring a midday connection with some of them to help fill the void.”

Said NBC Sports Executive Producer and President of Production Sam Flood: “We’re excited to bring viewers fresh programming every day with unique, topical conversations from prominent individuals in all corners of sports. This will be a daily lunch date to share sports and stories we miss during these unique times.”

Monday 4/6
12 p.m ET – Justin Leonard and Peter King
12:15 – Cris Collinsworth and Dale Earnhardt Jr
12:30 – Duke men’s basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski
12:40 – Seahawks QB Russell Wilson
12:50 – Jeff Burton and Steve Letarte

Tuesday 4/7
12:15 p.m. ET – Rebecca Lowe and Kathryn Tappen
12:30 – NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman
12:40 – NASCAR Driver Denny Hamlin

Wednesday 4/8
12:15 p.m. ET – Al Michaels and Doc Emrick
12:30 – PGA Golfer Justin Thomas
12:50 – Kyle Petty and Dale Jarrett

Thursday 4/9
12:50 p.m. ET – Keith Jones and Eddie Olczyk

Friday 4/10
12:15 p.m. ET – Michele Tafoya
12:40 – Dan Hicks and Paul Azinger
12:50 – Robbie Mustoe and Robbie Earle

Follow the show on Twitter at: @LunchTalkNBCSN

Lunch Talk Live will air weekdays at noon ET on NBCSN and stream on NBCSports.com here and the NBC Sports app. Select content and interviews will additionally be hosted on NBC Sports’ YouTube channel and social media platforms.

My Favorite Goal: Paul Henderson scores for Canada

1 Comment

Welcome to “My Favorite Goal,” a regular feature from NBC Sports where our writers and personalities remember the goals that have meant the most to them. These goals have left a lasting impression and there’s a story behind each one.

Today, Rotoworld Senior Hockey Writer and Editor Michael Finewax remembers Paul Henderson’s Summit Series winning goal in 1972.

Foster Hewitt: Henderson takes a wild stab at it and falls…right in front to Henderson…scores…HENDERSON HAS SCORED FOR CANADA

It was the Goal of the Century!

I still get the shivers when I hear that call and see the goal.

With all due respect to Sidney Crosby and the Golden Goal in 2010, the only goal that matters to my generation was the Henderson goal to beat the Soviet Union on September 28, 1972. The only goal that is close to that was Mike Eruzione’s goal in the 1980 Olympics to beat the Soviets.

It was a different time back then. Everyone ‘hated’ the Communist Soviet Union as it was a completely foreign way of life compared to our North American standards.

I want to set up the goal for everyone. The Soviet Union and Canada agreed to meet in an eight-game series with the first four games in Canada, a two-week break, and the final four games in Moscow. It was named the ‘Summit Series’. Everyone thought that the Canadian NHLers would easily sweep the Soviets who had only played other amateur teams at the World Championships.

The first game was in Montreal and Canada took a quick 2-0 lead, six minutes into the game. But the Soviets, who were in great shape, unlike Canada, stormed back and whipped Canada 7-3 as the hockey world quickly found out the Soviets did not play like amateurs.

Canada won Game 2 in Toronto and then the two teams tied in Winnipeg, before the Soviets beat Canada 5-3 in Vancouver, with the Vancouver fans booing the Canadians off the ice. Phil Esposito made a compassionate plea to the fans after the game that seemed to get the country behind the team.

It was off to Europe for the remainder of the games and after a couple of exhibition games against Sweden, Canada landed in Moscow for Game 5. Canada came out strong and led 4-1 with 11 minutes left in the game but the Soviets struck back with four goals to win and take a 3-1-1 lead.

Henderson’s heroics started in Game 6 when he scored the winner in a 3-2 victory for Canada and then he scored with 2:06 left in the third in Game 7 to give the Canadians a 4-3 win. He later said that it was the best goal he ever scored as he went around four players to do so.

The series changed a bit in Game 6 when Bobby Clarke, hated in the NHL for his style of play everywhere but in Philadelphia, became a hero in Canada when he slashed Valery Kharlamov, who was the Soviet’s top player, breaking his ankle.  That was just the way it was back then.

Game 8 was almost not played. Gary Bergman and Boris Mikhailov went at it late in Game 7 and Bergman stated that the Soviet center (who was the captain of the team at the 1980 Olympics) kicked him a couple of times. The Soviets agreed that the two West German referees (Germany had been split between communist East Germany and the western siding West Germany) would not referee in Game 8 but they went back on their word. Finally, an agreement was reached to have Josef Kompalla of West Germany and Rudolf Bata of Czechoslovakia would be the two referees.

The Soviets took a 1-0 lead with Canada two-men short on a couple of questionable calls and things got really heated when J.P. Parise (father of Zach Parise) was called for a penalty. He was so upset with Kompalla, that he drew his stick back in a motion to swing it at Kompalla and ended up getting a match penalty. The game was actually refereed better the rest of the way.

Canada tied it up on the power play and the teams traded goals in the first period as it ended in a 2-2 tie.

The two teams traded goals as Shadrin made it 3-2 for the Soviets but defenseman Bill White tied it up before Yakushev and Vasiliev gave the Soviets a 5-3 lead heading into the third.

I was watching the game in my basement on out 19-inch black-and-white tv. There were 20 million people living in Canada and it was said the 16 million watched the game.

Canada needed an early goal and Esposito got it 2:27 into the third. Canada tied it up at 5 when Yvan Cournoyer scored at the 12:56 mark of the third but after the goal there was a big kerfuffle across the ice.

Apparently, the goal light did not go on after the goal and NHLPA president Allan Eagleson went crazy. The Soviet soldiers did not like his attitude and were ready to arrest him when center Peter Mahovlich went over the boards to rescue Eagleson and brought him to the safety of the Canadian bench.

That was something as the whole Canadian team poured over the bench and took Eagleson away from the Soviets.

Canada kept coming but couldn’t score. With 1:44 left in the game and the faceoff in the Canadian end, Canada huddled (I have never seen anyone do that since).

The tension in Canada was unbearable.

With less than a minute left, Henderson called Cournoyer off the ice and made his mad dash to the Soviet end of the ice.

Foster Hewitt: Henderson takes a wild stab at it and falls…right in front to Henderson…scores…HENDERSON HAS SCORED FOR CANADA

There were 34 seconds left in the game and the third straight game winner for Henderson.

A nation rejoiced.

A couple of tidbits…The light did not go on after the Henderson’s goal. The goal judge at that end of the rink was Viktor Tikhonov who soon became the head coach of the Soviets and was their coach at the 1980 Olympics. When the Soviets went after the game to show the Canadian contingent that there was a malfunction with the light, somehow it worked every time.

Rotoworld’s Corey Abbott currently resides in the house that Foster Hewitt lived in for most of his adult life. Some mail once in a while still comes to the door, addressed to Foster Hewitt.

PREVIOUSLY ON MY FAVORITE GOAL
McCarty shows off goal-scoring hands during 1997 Cup Final
Ovechkin scores ‘The Goal’ as a rookie
• Malik’s stunning shootout winner vs. Capitals

Michael Finewax is entering his 14th season as the Senior Hockey Writer and Editor for Rotoworld. You can follow him on Twitter @mfinewaxhockey.

P.K. Subban, Lindsey Vonn announce engagement

5 Comments

Lindsey Vonn and P.K. Subban are engaged, according to U.S. Ski & Snowboard.

Vonn, who retired in February with a female record 82 World Cup wins, and Subban, a New Jersey Devils defenseman, have dated for more than one year.

Vonn was previously married to fellow Olympic skier Thomas Vonn in 2007. They announced divorce plans in late 2011.

Vonn reportedly grimaced when asked in 2013 if she would get married again.

“No, thanks!” she said, according to Vogue then. “I am definitely not getting married. To anyone.”

After her divorce, Vonn dated Tiger Woods and NFL assistant coach Kenan Smith before dating Subban, going public in June 2018.

“Right off the bat, I knew he was different,” Vonn said, according to a Vogue magazine announcement of the engagement. “But I’d been married before, so I was pretty hesitant to let myself think that I could find someone that I would want to be married to again. After a few months of dating, I knew he was the one I wanted to be with, though.”

Subban, 30, also owns an Olympic gold medal playing for Canada in Sochi.

“Lindsey’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me,” Subban said, according to Vogue. “There are people in life that deserve to be with good people. They have that person who takes care of them and makes them smile, and she deserves to be with someone who loves her more than anything else in the world, and I do.”

Vonn and Subban would become one of the most prominent married Olympic champion couples, joining the likes of tennis players Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf and gymnasts Nadia Comaneci and Bart Conner.

For more from Nick Zaccardi check out Olympic Talk on NBC Sports