If Bruins keep getting secondary scoring, look out

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The Boston Bruins have long been considered a “one-line team,” and that’s not such a bad thing when that one line features Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron, and David Pastrnak.

You’d think that the Bruins would have lost Game 7 against the Maple Leafs and Game 1 against the Columbus Blue Jackets, what with that one line essentially being held scoreless.*

Nope. The Bruins won both of those games, which leaves them with a 1-0 series lead against the Blue Jackets to begin Round 2.

[Read all about the Bruins’ 3-2 OT win here.]

* – Bergeron scored an empty-netter in Game 7, but it was a 5-1 goal that barely beat the buzzer and meant even less to the outcome of that decisive contest.

Consider some of the less-obvious players who’ve come through for the Bruins lately, and we’ll ponder how likely it is that they’ll be able to continue to contribute.

David Krejci

But first, an obvious player, as Krejci is a player whose play (73 points this season, tying a career-high) screams that the Bruins really haven’t only been a one-line team, in the first place. It’s probably true that Krejci isn’t quite the pivot who topped all playoff point producers in 2012-13 (26, seven more than anyone else) and 2010-11 (23), but he remains worthy of more attention than he gets on a team with justifiable spotlight-takers in Bergeron, Marchand, and Zdeno Chara.

The Bruins might end up needing even more from the supporting cast members below if Krejci needs to miss some time. NBC Sports Boston’s Joe Haggerty reports that Krejci is considered day-to-day, and it’s possible he got hurt here.

Even if Krejci plays, there’s the chance he wouldn’t be at full-strength, so these players may need to continue to step up as the series moves on to Game 2 on Saturday (8 p.m. ET; NBC; stream here).

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Charlie Coyle

The headline-grabber, naturally, is Coyle. He was already heating up during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, but Game 1 was his masterpiece, as Coyle scored the goal that sent Game 1 to overtime, and then tapped home the 2-1 OT-winner.

If you ever want a snapshot of how dramatically luck can shift from terrible to incredibly friendly, you could do worse than to look at Coyle right after the trade deadline versus Playoff Coyle.

Through 21 regular-season games after being traded to Bruins: two goals, six points, a pitiful 4.8 shooting percentage on 42 SOG.

Through eight playoff games: five goals, six points, an absurd 35.7 shooting percentage on 14 SOG.

Obviously, the truth about Coyle is somewhere between the guy who couldn’t buy a bucket during the regular season with Boston, and the player who’s scored a goal on his last three shots on goal.

Coyle finished 2018-19 with 34 points, but he generally strikes as a 40-50 point player, and has shown a decent ceiling with a career-high of 56 points in 2016-17. You can’t really expect spectacular scoring from Coyle, but if this run really heightens his self-confidence, he could really give the Bruins a chance to win the depth battle, at least some nights. That’s not as spectacular as scoring OT goals, but in the likely event that the top line starts scoring again, it makes the Bruins frightening.

Marcus Johansson

Goal scorers are the guys who “hit the long ball” to a great passer’s Maddux, but you merely need to watch replays of the two Coyle goals to see that Marcus Johansson was just as instrumental in those tide-changing tallies.

It’s tough not to root for a player like Johansson. When he was traded from Washington to New Jersey, it seemed like the Capitals got cap-crunched, and the Devils were really building something. Unfortunately, thanks in large part to a bad hit by Johansson’s now-teammate Brad Marchand, Johansson suffered serious health issues, and really hasn’t been the same player.

The Bruins were smart to give Johansson a shot via a rental, though, and the B’s could really be onto something if he finds chemistry with Coyle. Johansson’s 30 points in the regular season are actually a lot more impressive when you consider that he was limited to 58 games played, and if he can stay healthy, the Swede could put together a stellar contract year (er, contract playoff run?).

Again, don’t expect Coyle and Johansson to do Game 1 things during the rest of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, yet the chemistry and confidence could start soaring at this rate.

(And, hey, Coyle’s contract ends after 2019-20, so really, they’re both more or less playing for their futures.)

Jake DeBrusk

As the Bruins’ frequent second-liner alongside Krejci, DeBrusk quietly put up 27 goals despite being limited to 68 games. He had some memorable moments during the 2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs, and remains a strong contributor for Boston. In fact, if Krejci misses time, DeBrusk could show how much havoc he can create on his own.

Sean Kuraly/Noel Acciari/Joakim Nordstrom

OK, these guys weren’t exactly high-scorers during the regular season, and their contributions might not be super-dependable. Acciari’s goal on Sergei Bobrovsky to start the scoring in Game 1, and Kuraly’s big 3-1 goal against Frederik Andersen in Game 7 of Round 1 were both goals that the netminders really should have had. Still, if those guys can get the occasional goal and avoid being deep underwater on tougher nights, that could be big. (Some nights will be easier than others.)

Kuraly, in particular, shows a nice burst that can cause headaches for opponents, and his possession stats have been positive so far now that he’s managed to get healthy enough to appear in the playoffs.

***

Don’t let some hit-posts and other near-misses fool you; the Bruins are still going to lean heavily on their top trio, and barring health issues or a truly profound cold streak, they’ll likely deliver.

You need another players to pick up during the grind of the postseason, particularly against teams that are gameplanning to stop Bergeron, Marchand, and Pastrnak. The Bruins have been getting needed contributions from their supporting cast, and while that luck is almost certain to eventually cool off, there’s a solid chance that Coyle and Johansson could be bigger contributions than they were during the regular season.

That makes the Bruins a scary postseason opponent, especially if Krejci’s issues are short-lived.

The Bruins hope to build on their 1-0 series lead against the Blue Jackets in Game 2 at TD Garden at 8 p.m. ET on Saturday (NBC; stream here).

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

The Wraparound: Round 2 picture gets clearer with pair of Game 7s

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The Wraparound is your daily look at the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs. We’ll break down each day’s matchups with the all-important television and live streaming information included.

Round 1 is reaching its conclusion as we get to enjoy three Game 7s over the next two days. The fun begins tonight as the Toronto Maple Leafs visit the Boston Bruins (7 p.m. ET; NBCSN; live stream) and then the Vegas Golden Knights visit the San Jose Sharks (10 p.m. ET; NBCSN; Live stream). We finish this dizzying opening round on Wednesday when the defending Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals try to defend home ice against the Carolina Hurricanes (7:30 p.m. ET; NBCSN).

The Maple Leafs and Bruins meet yet again in a Game 7 in Round 1. The Bruins prevailed last season as well as that memorable final game in 2013. They currently own a five-game playoff series winning streak over Toronto, who have not won a round since 2004.

Per the NHL, the Bruins and Maple Leafs are the seventh set of franchises in league history to require a Game 7 in consecutive years, joining the Canadiens-Red Wings (1954 SCF, 1955 SCF), Blackhawks-Red Wings (1964 SF, 1965 SF), Avalanche-Stars (1999 CF, 2000 CF), Avalanche-Kings (2001 CSF, 2002 CQF), Capitals-Rangers (2012 CSF, 2013 CQF) and Kings-Sharks (2013 CSF, 2014 R1).

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Another fun stat: When Zdeno Chara hits the ice, he’ll play in his 13th career Game 7, tying Patrick Roy and Scott Stevens for most all-time.

When the puck drops at SAP Center, the Golden Knights will be playing in their first ever Game 7. The Sharks, meanwhile, are veterans in this do-or-die scenarios, entering Tuesday with a 6-4 record in such playoff games.

Martin Jones, whose 58-save performance in Game 6 is a big reason why we’re here, is one of six different San Jose goaltenders to have won a Game 7. A victory tonight would make him the first netminder in franchise history with multiple wins in a Game 7. His opponent at the other end, Marc-Andre Fleury, has three career Game 7 wins, all coming on the road.

Henrik Lundqvist, Patrick Roy and Martin Brodeur hold the NHL record with six Game 7 victories.

Here are three trends via the NHL to keep an eye on over the next two days:

Of the 172 all-time Game 7s in the Stanley Cup Playoffs…
• The team that scores first is 128-44 (.744)
• Home teams own a 100-72 record (.581)
• Forty-one have required overtime (23.8%). Home teams have a 21-20 edge.

PHT’s 2019 Stanley Cup playoff previews
Capitals vs Hurricanes
Bruins vs. Maple Leafs
Sharks vs. Golden Knights

Power Rankings: Why your team won’t win the Stanley Cup
NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs: Round 1 schedule, TV info

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

The Playoff Buzzer: Rantanen pushes Flames to brink; Pastrnak emerges from slumber

  • Pastrnak awakes, scores twice as Boston even series 2-2
  • Roope Hintz scores a brace as Stars make it rain on Predators to even series 2-2
  • Mikko. Rantanen. Two goals, one to tie the game late in the third, a second to win it in overtime and give Colorado a 3-1 series edge 

Bruins 6, Maple Leafs 4 (Series tied 2-2)

The Bruins responded, just as they did in Game 2. David Pastrnak scored twice and Zdeno Chara became the second oldest defenseman in the NHL to score a playoff goal, one that stood as the game-winner as a 5-2 lead evaporated late for the Bruins. This series shifts back to Boston now.

Stars 5, Predators 1 (Series tied 2-2)

Four goals were scored in the opening 13:45 of the first period. Dallas, of course, scored all of them and Pekka Rinne‘s night was done early. That’s the story of this one as the Stars won the game in the first period and held the Predators at bay for the rest of the night.

Avalanche 3, Flames 2 (Colorado leads 3-1)

A wild third-period comeback. A wild overtime. One hell of a save. One hell of a penalty kill. And one epic comeback.

All these things converged to give the Avs a commanding 3-1 series lead on the best team in the Western Conference during the regular season. Mikko Rantanen starred, scoring the tying goal in the third period late and then converting in overtime.

Three stars

1. Mikko Rantanen, Colorado Avalanche

What can you say about the young Finn that hasn’t been said already?

A game-tying goal on the power play with 2:50 to go in the third period off an incredible pass from Nathan MacKinnon, and then an overtime winner to push Calgary to the brink of elimination.

2. David Pastrnak, Boston Bruins

‘Pasta’ picked a good game to start cooking with the sauce. He grabbed his first two goals of the series to put the Bruins up 4-2, and they held on to a 6-2 win to even the best-of-7 series 2-2.

3. Roope Hintz, Dallas Stars

Like Pastrnak, Hintz, too, had a brace, scoring his first and second goals of the series as the Stars dropped the Preds 5-1.

Hintz nearly had a hat trick, but his shorthanded attempt rung off the iron.

Highlights of the night

Pastrnak show:

Grubauer with an epic save in OT:

Factoids

  • Old man Chara still doing things, like becoming the second oldest d-man to score a playoff goal. (NHL PR)
  • Pekka Rinne was pulled from a playoff game for the 10th time in his career. (Sportsnet Stats)
  • Calgary has never won a playoff series where they’ve trailed 3-1. (Sportsnet Stats)

Thursday’s Games
Game 4: Capitals at Hurricanes (WSH leads 2-1), 7 p.m. ET, NBCSN (Live Stream)
Game 5: Blues at Jets (Series tied 2-2) 8:30 p.m. ET; USA, (Live stream)
Game 5: Golden Knights at Sharks (Vegas leads 3-1), 10 p.m. ET; NBCSN (Live stream)


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Pastrnak breaks out, leads Bruins to 6-4 win over Leafs in Game 4

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One of the biggest concerns for the Boston Bruins through the first three games of Round 1 was David Pastrnak‘s lack of offensive contributions. On Wednesday, Pastrnak was the difference in Boston’s 6-4 victory over Toronto.

Down 2-1 in the series, the Bruins got an early opportunity in their quest to even the series when Connor Brown was sent to the sin bin for holding just 1:08 minutes into the game. Initially, the Bruins had trouble getting anything going in their power play, but the end result is all that matters and in this case it was a goal from Charlie McAvoy in the dying seconds of the man advantage. Just 3:35 minutes later, Brad Marchand pushed the Bruins’ lead to 2-0.

Toronto heated up late in the first though and was aided by a couple Bruins penalties in quick succession. Technically Boston killed off both penalties, but Zach Hyman found the back of the net through traffic mere seconds after the second power-play opportunity expired.

Auston Matthews evened the contest just 1:07 minutes into the second period, but that’s when Pastrnak woke up. He scored his first two goals of the series just 1:35 minutes apart to establish another two-goal lead for Boston.

Speaking of players who hadn’t scored yet in this series. Zdeno Chara managed to mash one past Leafs goaltender Frederik Andersen at 5:39 of the third to expand the Bruins’ lead to 5-2.

That extra goal proved to be critical. McAvoy was caught hi-sticking. His previous penalty was the one that led to the Hyman goal, even if Boston technically completed its penalty kill just before Hyman scored. This time around Matthews needed just 10 seconds of power-play time to net his second goal of the game. With new life breathed into the Maple Leafs, Travis Dermott scored at 13:27 and suddenly Boston’s lead was just a goal.

It was enough to make the ending interesting, but not change the outcome. Boston held on and Joakim Nordstrom got the empty netter with just two seconds left to close out the game.

For the second time in this series, the Bruins have successfully responded to a Toronto victory. This win also put the onus back on the Maple Leafs to win another game at TD Garden. The Bruins haven’t had the series lead yet, but with two of the final three games at home, they’re the ones in the enviable position going forward.

Maple Leafs-Bruins Game 5 from TD Garden will be Friday night at 7:00 p.m. ET on NBCSN

Ryan Dadoun is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @RyanDadoun.

With 2011 title team aging, Bruins hope to make another run

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BOSTON (AP) — Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand doesn’t believe for a second that the window is closing on the team’s chances to win another Stanley Cup championship with the core that etched its name on the trophy in 2011.

One of five members of the last Bruins team to won it all – they also returned to the Cup finals two years later – Marchand insisted there’s no special push to win before 42-year-old defenseman Zdeno Chara skates into retirement

”That guys going to play until he’s 50,” Marchand said with a laugh. ”He’s just a freak. He competes and trains and prepares harder than anyone I’ve ever seen. There’s a reason why he’s going to be a Hall of Fame player, and he’s playing at his age because he cares and trains well enough to be here.”

The Bruins open their postseason Thursday night against the Toronto Maple Leafs. Game 2 is Saturday night before the best-of-seven series moves to Toronto for Games 3 and 4 on The two teams also played in the first round last year, when Boston won in seven games.

But Chara is a year older, and he played in just 62 games this season after missing six weeks in November and December with a left knee injury. So is forward Patrice Bergeron, now 33, who along with David Krejci (32), goalie Tuukka Rask (31) and Marchand (30), are the only players left from the ’11 champions.

”I don’t think about that,” said Chara, who signed an extension through next season. ”I’m in the present, where my feet are.”

But at least one of his younger teammates is thinking about it.

”There’s definitely a part of it that says, ‘Hey, let’s win it for these guys,”’ said 21-year-old defenseman Charlie McAvoy. ”There’s gonna come a time, unfortunately, where the team might not look the same that it looks now, whenever that day comes. But I think that the team we have is so special. … It just seems like there’s something about this locker room and the veterans that bring everyone so close. It truly is a family.”

Here are some other things to look for from the series:

BAD HISTORY

Toronto is looking to advance in the postseason for the first time in 15 years, and Boston is a bad draw. The Bruins not only knocked them out last year, but also in a devastating seven-game series their previous playoff matchup, in 2013.

After taking a 3-1 lead in the series, Boston lost Games 5 and 6 and fell behind 4-1 in the third period of the decisive seventh game. But they rallied to send it into overtime with two goals in the last 82 seconds of regulation, then won en route to their second Stanley Cup Finals appearance in three years.

Boston also won this year’s season series 3-1.

”I don’t think anything in the past has anything to do with this season. I don’t think they’re concerned about it,” Marchand said. ”We are going gonna start a whole new season tomorrow.”

NEW BLOOD

The Maple Leafs added center John Tavares to the team that lost to Boston in last year’s playoffs, and that’s no small difference. The former Islander, who signed a seven-year, $77-million deal with Toronto as a free agent, tallied 88 points this season, including a league-leading 37 even-strength goals.

ON POINT

Toronto had never had back-to-back 100-point years before earning 105 last season and 100 on the nose in 2018-19. (To be fair, for the first half of their history they played between 18 and 70 games; the addition of a point for an OT or shootout loss has also contributed to the inflation.)

For Maple Leafs coach Mike Babcock, it’s proof that things are going in the right direction.

”When I look at what we’ve been able to do here, I’m obviously really proud of where we’re at and where we’re going,” he said after practice in Toronto.

It has also created pressure on the team to end a Stanley Cup drought that dates to 1967.

”Pressure is a privilege,” he said. ”Pressure simply means you have a chance. A little duress for everybody, and that’s where the fun’s at.”

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports