Par Lindholm

Krejci may miss Bruins opener; Bergeron expected to be ready

BOSTON  — A major part of the Boston Bruins’ success the past several years has been their depth at center.

That depth might be tested early this season, with center David Krejci questionable for the Bruins’ regular-season opener at the Dallas Stars on Thursday.

Krejci, who suffered a lower-body injury and played just two shifts in a preseason game on Sept. 23, practiced Tuesday. But he didn’t take contact and general manager Don Sweeney left open the possibility that the Bruins won’t have Krejci against the Stars.

”It’s to be determined still,” Sweeney said. ”He worked his way back up there for sake of a practice, and he’ll continue to do the same. So we’ll re-evaluate every day. He’s possible.”

Krejci said he’s making progress.

”It was a good day today, for sure,” he said.

Fellow center Patrice Bergeron was slow in returning from a groin injury during training camp. But he made his preseason debut in Boston’s last exhibition game and is expected to be ready against Dallas. When healthy, the Bruins’ center quartet of Bergeron, Krejci, Charlie Coyle and Sean Kuraly is one of the best in the league and was important in the Bruins reaching Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final last season.

The Bruins got by last season without Bergeron for 16 games and Kuraly for 10, in addition to tens of man games lost by their defensemen, and finished tied for second in the NHL overall standings with 107 points.

Bergeron had 79 points (32 goals, 47 assists) in 65 games. Krejci had 73 points (20 goals, 52 assists) in 81 games, Kuraly had 21 points (eight goals, 13 assists) in 71 games and Coyle had six points (two goals, four assists) in 21 games after joining Boston in a February trade from the Minnesota Wild. But Coyle showed more of his abilities in the postseason, getting 16 points (nine goals, seven assists) in 24 games.

”I think it was a factor last year for our hockey club, the success we had,” Sweeney said. ”All those guys can help drive a line. . Charlie Coyle is the same way, Sean Kuraly is the same way. They have roles, they have responsibilities and standards that (coach) Bruce (Cassidy) holds them to each and every night.”

Bruins president Cam Neely said: ”I really like the fact that when we’re on the road, Butch (Cassidy) (doesn’t) worry as much about matchups based on what Kuraly can do, when he plays against top lines. That line is pretty solid for us. So I think it gives Butch a lot more flexibility because of the depth we have down the middle.”

As expected, defensemen John Moore (shoulder) and Kevan Miller (knee) won’t be healthy to start the season. Forward Joakim Nordstrom (foot) had a setback during training and probably will also start the season on the sideline. The only two new faces expected on the roster Thursday will be forwards Brett Ritchie and Par Lindholm.

”Well I thought we were a successful team last year and we have a motivated group,” Sweeney said. ”We did feel like our depth and organizationally we’re going to continue to get stronger, so we feel that we have internal competition, we have players that can come up and do the job. We’ve been testing that over the last few years and had some success but also had some failures as well, and trying to learn from it.”

NOTES: Nothing has changed as far as the way the Bruins are being run since the Boston Globe reported last month that owner Jeremy Jacobs had passed on control of the team to his six children, team officials stressed Tuesday during a news conference. ”It’s been magnified and maybe misrepresented,” Jacobs said. ”There was a trust made recently that put the Bruin asset into a beneficiary so when I croak, it will be the next generation. Nothing has changed as far as positions and authority and responsibility. I still will be in the same position.” Bruins CEO Charlie Jacobs, the youngest of the six children, confirmed that it’s been business as usual for the team. Two brothers, Louis and Jerry, are the only other offspring currently involved in the family business. ”But as for a decision-making process, most of our decisions are collaborative, unless of course our chairman has a thought, and of course we do what he tells us to do,” Charlie Jacobs said.

Same squad, same goal: Bruins want another shot at Cup

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BOSTON — The Boston Bruins didn’t sign a bunch of pricey free agents over the summer after barely missing out on a Stanley Cup championship last season.

Instead, they handed out extensions.

After going to the last possible game of the season, losing to the St. Louis Blues in Game 7 of the Cup final, the Bruins are bringing back essentially the same roster for another try at their second NHL title of the decade. Coach Bruce Cassidy got a new deal, as did defensemen Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo; captain Zdeno Chara received a one-year extension in March.

”It was a good year, we fell one game short and now we’ve got to work on getting back to that position and not falling one game short,” Cassidy said. ”We’re going to try to, like I said, deal with it and just get on with the season. … I hope we don’t have a hangover. I certainly don’t intend on having one.”

Cassidy took the Bruins to an Eastern Conference championship in just his second full season on the bench, thanks largely to a core of players from the team that won it all in 2011. And he’ll have the same nucleus this year: Chara on defense, Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand at forward, and Tuukka Rask in net.

Joining Bergeron and Marchand on the most potent first line in hockey is David Pastrnak, with David Krejci centering the second line. The 42-year-old Chara will team up with the 21-year-old McAvoy on defense, with Torey Krug (who’s 28) and Carlo (22) as the No. 2 pairing.

The mix of youth and experience is one of the team’s strengths.

”Look at guys around the league in their 30s, they’re really good players. Look at our guys in their 30s, we all had a really good season last year,” Krejci said. ”We’re not a year older, we’re just a couple months older. So I feel like we’re in good shape and we’re ready to go.”

Last year’s team finished second in the Atlantic Division with 107 points, then got a break when it didn’t have to face Tampa Bay or Washington in the rest of the playoffs – or any other division winner, for that matter. After beating the 100-point Toronto Maple Leafs in seven games in the first round, the Bruins didn’t play another 100-point team.

They took out the Blue Jackets in six games and swept the Hurricanes, then beat the Blues 7-2 in Game 6 in St. Louis to force a seventh game at home. But they couldn’t solve Blues rookie Jordan Binnington in the decisive game, and St. Louis skated around the Boston ice with the Cup.

”You know what, I don’t think we’re over it, I don’t think I’m over it,” Bruins forward Sean Kuraly said. ”But you move on, you know you’ve got hockey to play and I think playing hockey will help.”

The Bruins also know they weren’t at their best in June, after Chara took a puck off his face and played the last three games of the Cup finals with his broken jaw wired shut. He also had an unspecified lower body injury that took him out of the fourth game of the conference finals.

That forced the team to improvise on defense, where Kevan Miller was also out with a broken kneecap for the entire postseason. On offense, Bergeron and Marchand were also dealing with injuries.

They’re counting on a healthier team to get them back in position for the Cup.

Here are some things to look for from the Bruins this season:

WHO’S HERE: F Brett Ritchie, F Par Lindholm.

WHO’S NOT: F Noel Acciari, F Marcus Johansson.

KEY PLAYERS: With his three-year deal, McAvoy is now the heir apparent to Chara as the team’s top defenseman for years to come. The line of Bergeron, Marchand and Pastrnak combined for 260 points in the regular season and 59 in the playoffs. Jake DeBrusk went from 16 goals in his rookie season to 27 last year. Rask played a six-year low of 46 games last year and is back in goal.

OUTLOOK: The Bruins are deep on defense, blending the aged Chara with players like McAvoy and Carlo. They have the most productive first line in hockey, but they are still looking for a second line right wing after finding no replacement for Johansson in the offseason. And then there are the injury issues that can beset an older team, chief among them Bergeron’s groin problem that has lingered into training camp.

PREDICTION: If Chara, Bergeron (34 years old) and Rask (32) can hold up, the Bruins can look forward to another long playoff run. They can’t count on other teams clearing out the Eastern Conference for them in the playoffs, though, so they’ll need to close the gap on Tampa Bay if they want to raise another banner in the new Boston Garden.

It’s Winnipeg Jets Day at PHT

Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to identifying X-factors to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Winnipeg Jets. 

2018-19
47-30-5, 99 points (2nd in the Central Division, T-4th in the Western Conference).
Playoffs: Eliminated in Round 1 by the St. Louis Blues in six games.

IN
Neal Pionk
Gabriel Bourque
Anthony Bitetto
Mark Letestu

OUT
Jacob Trouba
Kevin Hayes
Ben Chiarot
Matt Hendricks (retired)
Tyler Myers
Marko Dano
Nic Kerdiles
Joe Morrow
Brandon Tanev
Par Lindholm
Bogdan Kiselevich

RE-SIGNED
Laurent Brossoit
Seth Griffith
Andrew Copp
Cameron Schilling
Nathan Beaulieu
Logan Shaw
C.J. Seuss
J.C. Lipon

[MORE: Three questions | X-factorMaurice under pressure]

2018-19 Season Summary

As NHL teams headed out to enjoy the Christmas break last December, the Jets were sitting pretty. They had just won 11 of their previous 13 games and were atop the Central Divison, four points ahead of the Nashville Predators.

The winning ways continued into February, but the success slowed down and some real concerns started bubbling up. Patrik Laine, whose early season was highlighted by a hat trick in an NHL Global Series game in his home country of Finland and a five-goal performance three games later, saw his goal scoring come to a halt. After scoring 18 goals in the month of November, the sniper only scored nine times in the team’s final 58 games. The penalty kill’s success dropped 5% and Connor Hellebuyck, coming off a season that saw him a finalist for the Vezina Trophy, couldn’t find consistency.

As Scott Billeck pointed out following the Jets’ playoff exit, there was 19-day stretch in February where the Jets lost twice to the Senators, twice to the Avalanche, and once to the Canadiens, Coyotes and Wild. Let’s not forget about some major injuries as well. Dustin Byfuglien missed 34 games due to a pair of ankle injuries. Josh Morrissey was out 20 games after taking a hit up high.

Despite a 99-point season, the Jets just didn’t feel like a team that was going to make noise in the playoffs. Something was just off.

The Jets finished with five fewer wins and 15 fewer points in 2018-19 than 2017-18. They banked enough points early on to help them remain in the dog fight for the Central Division title, which could be claimed by the Predators by a single point. The Stanley Cup playoff experience would be a short one as they were knocked out by the eventual champion Blues in six games sending them into the summer with questions.

What is Laine’s future? The forward was not happy about his year and remains a restricted free agent as September arrives. The Jets have $16M in cap space to re-sign him and fellow RFA Kyle Connor, who was second on the team with 34 goals. Will general manager Kevin Cheveldayoff go the bridge route with one or both? Will the negotiations bleed into training camp and even the regular season? Can Laine regain his scoring touch and can Connor build off a second straight 30-goal campaign?

The Central is once again shaping up to be one of, if not the toughest division in the NHL. The Jets can’t afford another disappointing season, otherwise there will be the desire for big changes. Will they be able to live up to their potential and make a run in the Western Conference?

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

It’s Boston Bruins Day at PHT

Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to identifying X-factors to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Boston Bruins. 

2018-19
49-24-9 107 points (2nd in Atlantic Division, 2nd in Eastern Conference)
Playoffs: Lost Stanley Cup Final in seven games to Blues

IN
Brett Ritchie
Par Lindholm
Brendan Gaunce
Maxime Lagace

OUT
Marcus Johansson
Noel Acciari
Lee Stempniak
Jordan Szwarz
Gemel Smith
Zane MacIntyre

RE-SIGNED
Danton Heinen
Peter Cehlarik
Connor Clifton
Steven Kampfer
Ryan Fitzgerald

2018-19 Season Summary

One more win, that’s all they needed. The Bruins fought off the Blues in Game 6 to force a do-or-die game in the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. Unfortunately for them, eight years after they won a Game 7 to top the Vancouver Canucks for the title, they fell short in a 4-1 defeat to St. Louis.

The loss put a sour note on an otherwise great season for the Bruins. They finished tied with the Calgary Flames for the second-most points in the NHL during the regular season. Brad Marchand stayed out of trouble for the most part and recorded a career-high 100 points. David Pastrnak, while playing only 66 games, topped his previous career marks with 38 goals and 81 points. Jake DeBrusk scored a career high 27 goals, and Patrice Bergeron, in his 15th NHL season hit a personal best 79 points and tied his career high in goals with 32. With a lighter workload (46 appearances), Tuukka Rask posted his best even strength save percentage (.925) in five seasons, and the power play clicked at 25.9%, the best success rate the franchise has seen since 1980-81 (25.4%). 

Basically, everything went pretty swimmingly in 2018-19 for the Bruins. Head coach Bruce Cassidy continued the success that started after he replaced Claude Julien in Feb. 2017. Since that time the team has a 61% win percentage (117-52-22) and have accumulated the second-most points (256) in the NHL.

[MORE BRUINS: X-Factor | Under Pressure | Three questions]

So it was no surprise the Bruins cruised through the regular season and played their way into Cup contender status as the playoffs began. Waiting for them in Round 1 were the Toronto Maple Leafs, who were vanquished yet again in seven games for the third time in seven seasons. Next, the Cinderella Columbus Blue Jackets were ousted in six games after taking a 2-1 series lead. In the Eastern Conference Final, the other surprise team, the Carolina Hurricanes, were swept, putting Boston in the Cup Final for the 20th time in franchise history.

There were few good moments for the Bruins in the final series against the Blues, one was the return of Zdeno Chara to the lineup in Game 5 at TD Garden after breaking his jaw.

But now as they rest up with a short summer in preparation to get back to the Cup Final and win it, the Bruins’ roster won’t be drastically different, at least at the start of the season. A cap crunch and needing to re-sign two important pieces on the blue line has kept general manager Don Sweeney from going out and adding big names to the lineup.

The offseason has been quiet, aside from some minor additions and a few departures. Atop Sweeney’s to-do list is to re-sign restricted free agents Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo. There’s currently a little over $7 million in cap room and it’s a question if one or both will still be unsigned when training camp opens next month. There’s plenty of confidence both will get extensions given that McAvoy is ineligible for an offer sheet, and while Carlo is eligible, NHL GMs have shown a general dislike in using them.

MORE: ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Pro Hockey Talk’s 2019 NHL Trade Deadline Tracker

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The PHT NHL Trade Deadline Tracker is your one-stop shop for all completed deals. The 2019 NHL trade deadline is Monday, Feb. 25 at 3 p.m. ET.

Feb. 25, 2019
Winnipeg Jets:
Alex Broadhurst
Columbus Blue Jackets:
Future considerations

Feb. 25, 2019
Pittsburgh Penguins:
Chris Wideman
Florida Panthers:
Jean-Sebastien Dea

Feb. 25, 2019
Winnipeg Jets:
Nic Petan
Toronto Maple Leafs:
Par Lindholm

Feb. 25, 2019
Vancouver Canucks:
Linus Karlsson
San Jose Sharks:
Jonathan Dahlen

Feb. 25, 2019
Winnipeg Jets:
Bogdan Kiselevich
Florida Panthers:
 2021 seventh-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019
Winnipeg Jets:
Nathan Beaulieu
Buffalo Sabres:
2019 sixth-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Pittsburgh Penguins:
Erik Gudbranson
Vancouver Canucks:
Tanner Pearson

Feb. 25, 2019
Winnipeg Jets:
Matt Hendricks
Minnesota Wild:
 2020 seventh-round pick

[Winners and losers of the 2019 NHL Trade Deadline]

Feb. 25, 2019
Anaheim Ducks: 2019 sixth-round pick
St. Louis Blues:
Michael Del Zotto

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Boston Bruins:
Marcus Johansson
New Jersey Devils:
2019 second-round pick, 2020 fourth-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Philadelphia Flyers:
Ryan Hartman, conditional 2020 fourth-round pick
Nashville Predators:
Wayne Simmonds

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Vegas Golden Knights: Mark Stone, Tobias Lindberg
Ottawa Senators: Erik Brannstrom, Oscar Lindberg, 2020 second-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Minnesota Wild:
Kevin Fiala
Nashville Predators:
Mikael Granlund

Feb. 25, 2019
Los Angeles Kings: Conditional 2020 fourth-round pick
Calgary Flames:
Oscar Fantenberg

Feb. 25, 2019
Columbus Blue Jackets:
Adam McQuaid
New York Rangers:
Julius Bergman, 2019 fourth-round pick, 2019 seventh-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Colorado Avalanche:
Derick Brassard, 2020 conditional sixth-round pick
Florida Panthers:
2020 third-round pick

Feb. 25, 2019
Florida Panthers:
Cliff Pu, future considerations
Carolina Hurricanes:
Tomas Jurco, future considerations

Feb. 25, 2019
Montreal Canadiens: Jordan Weal
Arizona Coyotes:
Michael Chaput

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
New York Rangers:
Brendan Lemieux, 2019 first-round pick, 2022 conditional fourth-round pick
Winnipeg Jets:
 Kevin Hayes

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
New Jersey Devils:
2022 fifth-round pick
Columbus Blue Jackets:
Keith Kinkaid

Feb. 25, 2019
Anaheim Ducks: Patrick Sieloff
Ottawa Senators:
Brian Gibbons

Feb. 25, 2019 (PHT analysis)
San Jose Sharks: Gustav Nyquist
Detroit Red Wings: 2019 second-round pick, 2020 conditional third-round pick

Feb. 24, 2019
Toronto Maple Leafs: Nic Baptiste
Nashville Predators: Future considerations

Feb. 24, 2019
Los Angeles Kings: Matheson Iacopelli
Blackhawks: Spencer Watson

Feb. 24, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Buffalo Sabres: Brandon Montour
Anaheim Ducks: Brendan Guhle, conditional 2019 first-round pick

Feb. 23, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Columbus Blue Jackets:
Ryan Dzingel, 2019 seventh-round pick
Ottawa Senators: Anthony Duclair, 2020 second-round pick, 2021 second-round pick

Feb. 23, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Dallas Stars:
Mats Zuccarello
New York Rangers: Conditional picks – 2019 second-round pick, 2020 third-round pick. Both can become first-round picks.

Feb. 23, 2019
New Jersey Devils
: Connor Carrick, 2019 third-round pick
Dallas Stars: Ben Lovejoy

Feb. 22, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Washington Capitals: Nick Jensen, 2019 fifth-round pick
Detroit Red Wings: Madison Bowey, 2020 second-round pick

Feb. 22, 2019
Florida Panthers:
Vincent Praplan
San Jose Sharks: 
Future considerations

Feb. 22, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Columbus Blue Jackets: Matt Duchene, Julius Bergman
Ottawa Senators:
Vitaly Abramov, Jonathan Davidsson, 2019 lottery-protected first-round pick, 2020 conditional first-round pick.

Feb. 21, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Washington Capitals:
Carl Hagelin
Los Angeles Kings: 2019 third-round pick, 2020 conditional sixth-round pick. LA retains 50 percent of Hagelin’s cap hit.

Feb. 20, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Boston Bruins:
Charlie Coyle
Minnesota Wild:
Ryan Donato, conditional 2019 fifth-round pick

Feb. 18, 2019
New York Rangers: Darren Raddysh
Chicago Blackhawks:
Peter Holland

Feb. 16, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Edmonton Oilers: Sam Gagner
Vancouver Canucks: 
Ryan Spooner

Feb. 15, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Philadelphia Flyers:
Cam Talbot
Edmonton Oilers:
Anthony Stolarz

Feb. 12, 2019
New York Rangers: 2020 seventh-round pick
Vancouver Canucks: 
Marek Mazanec

Feb. 11, 2019
Columbus Blue Jackets: conditional seventh-round 2019 pick
Pittsburgh Penguins: Blake Siebenaler

Feb. 11, 2019
Montreal Canadiens: Nate Thompson, 2019 fifth-round pick
Los Angeles Kings: 2019 fourth-round pick

Feb. 9, 2019 (PHT Analysis)
Philadelphia Flyers: Dave Schlemko, Byron Froese
Montreal Canadiens: Dale Weise, Christian Folin

Feb. 8, 2019
Arizona Coyotes: Emil Pettersson
Nashville Predators: Laurent Dauphin, Adam Helewka

Feb. 6, 2019
Nashville Predators:
Cody McLeod
New York Rangers:
2020 seventh-round pick

Feb. 6, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Nashville Predators
: Brian Boyle
New Jersey Devils: 2019 second-round pick

Feb. 6, 2019
Ottawa Senators: Jean-Christophe Beaudin
Colorado Avalanche: Max McCormick

Feb. 1, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Pittsburgh Penguins: Nick Bjugstad, Jared McCann
Florida Panthers: Derick Brassard, Riley Sheahan, 2019 second-round picks and two 2019 fourth-round picks

Jan. 30, 2019
New Jersey Devils
: Ryan Murphy
Minnesota Wild: Michael Kapla

Jan. 28, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Toronto Maple Leafs: Jake Muzzin
Los Angeles Kings: Carl Grundstrom, Sean Durzi, 2019 first-round pick

Jan. 28, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Pittsburgh Penguins
: 2019 fourth-round pick
Dallas Stars: Jamie Oleksiak

Jan. 24, 2019
Chicago Blackhawks: Dominik Kubalik
Los Angeles Kings: 2019 fifth-round pick

Jan. 21, 2019
Minnesota Wild
: Brad Hunt, 2019 sixth-round pick
Vegas Golden Knights: 2019 conditional fifth-round pick

Jan. 17, 2019
Buffalo Sabres
: Taylor Leier
Philadelphia Flyers: Justin Bailey

Jan. 17, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Minnesota Wild
: Victor Rask
Carolina Hurricanes: Nino Niederreiter

Jan. 16, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Anaheim Ducks
: Michael Del Zotto
Vancouver Canucks: Luke Schenn, 2020 seventh-round pick

Jan. 16, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Anaheim Ducks
: Derek Grant
Pittsburgh Penguins: Joseph Blandisi

Jan. 16, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Minnesota Wild
: Pontus Aberg
Anaheim Ducks: Justin Kloos

Jan. 14, 2019
New York Rangers
: Connor Brickley
Nashville Predators: Cole Schneider

Jan. 14, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Anaheim Ducks
: Devin Shore
Dallas Stars: Andrew Cogliano

Jan. 11, 2019
Chicago Blackhawks
: Slater Koekkoek, 2019 fifth-round pick
Tampa Bay Lightning: Jan Rutta, 2019 seventh-round pick

Jan. 11, 2019 (PHT analysis)
Arizona Coyotes: Jordan Weal
Philadelphia Flyers: 2019 sixth-round pick

Jan. 11, 2019
Ottawa Senators: Cody Goloubef
Boston Bruins: Paul Carey

Jan. 11, 2019
Ottawa Senators
: Morgan Klimchuk
Toronto Maple Leafs: Gabriel Gagne

Jan. 3, 2019
Winnipeg Jets: Jimmy Oligny
Vegas Golden Knights: Futures

Jan. 3, 2019
St. Louis Blues
: Jared Coreau
Anaheim Ducks: Futures

Jan. 2, 2019
Ottawa Senators:
Anders Nilsson, Darren Archibald
Vancouver Canucks: Mike McKenna, Tom Pyatt, 2019 sixth-round pick