Nolan Patrick

Stewart earns contract with Flyers after month-long PTO

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Chris Stewart’s tryout with the Philadelphia Flyers has come to an end and the result is a one-way contract with the team.

The Flyers announced on Tuesday that they have signed the soon-to-be 32-year-old winger to a one-year, $750,000 contract. Stewart had been on a PTO deal since training camp and due to a salary cap crunch were unable to sign him. That door opened on Monday when Andy Welinski was waived, freeing up the money to make it happen.

“We’re happy to have Chris under contract,” said Flyers GM Chuck Fletcher in a statement. “Chris came into training camp with a great attitude and a strong work-ethic. He brings size and a veteran presence to our lineup.”

Welinski, along with Nolan Patrick, had been on injured reserve and his salary counted against the Flyers’ cap, tying Fletcher’s hands. His $750,000 salary will now come off the books after clearing waivers as he heads to the AHL.

Despite retaining PTO status once the season began, Stewart has been with the Flyers through their three games. He was with them on their early-season jaunt to Europe and has been skating with the team as they take part in their current Western Canada road trip. He’s expected to make his debut Tuesday night in Calgary. Per the Courier Post, the Flyers have been covering the cost of Stewart’s hotel, which is near their training facility, and he’s been receiving per diem.

Before signing his PTO with the Flyers in July, Stewart had not played in the NHL since the 2017-18 season when he suited up for 54 games with the Wild and Flames. He spent last season in Great Britain’s EIHL playing for the Nottingham Panthers.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

McKenzie on Devils-Hischier contract talks, health of Flyers’ Patrick

Hockey insider Bob McKenzie stopped by the NBCSN studio during the first intermission of Devils – Flyers on Tuesday (a 4-0 win for Philadelphia), providing some interesting updates on the top pick of the 2017 NHL Draft (Nico Hischier) and Nolan Patrick, who went second that same year.

Devils aim for extension with Hischier

McKenzie brought up some interesting comparables for Hischier, including Arizona Coyotes winger Clayton Keller (eight year extension with $7.15M AAV begins next season) and Winnipeg Jets forward Kyle Connor (signed for seven years, $7.14M AAV this summer). McKenzie explains that, while Hischier might not have reached the same production heights as Connor or Keller when those two had been at their best, Hischier’s all-around game makes up some of the difference.

The Devils have some reason to show some haste. While there might be some sticker shock at being in that $7M stratosphere, Hischier could really drive up his perceived value if he enjoys a huge season with Taylor Hall on his wing. McKenzie wonders if Hischier might even push for a Mikko Rantanen-type deal ($9.2M AAV) if he has a big enough 2019-20.

With Hall in a contract year, the Devils could also get some cost certainty if they hash something out sooner, rather than later.

Of course, McKenzie describes this opportunity as a “platform year” for Hischier, who might benefit from waiting things out.

Migraine issues still fuzzy for Patrick

The Flyers are hoping to have impressive depth down the middle once Patrick can join Sean Couturier and Kevin Hayes.

While McKenzie reports that there has been progress – Patrick didn’t travel overseas with the Flyers, but is expected to travel with the team in North America – it sounds like this is still a week-to-week thing for the 21-year-old.

MORE:
• Pro Hockey Talk’s Stanley Cup picks.
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Nolan Patrick won’t be ready for start of Flyers’ season

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So far in Nolan Patrick‘s young career, things haven’t exactly gone as planned. The odds of Patrick getting off to a strong start in 2019-20 looks slimmer after an unsettling announcement on Thursday.

The Philadelphia Flyers announced that Patrick won’t be ready for the start of the season, and is considered week-to-week with migraine syndrome. Patrick just turned 21 on Sept. 19.

Here’s the official release from the Flyers:

Via Dr. Stephen D. Silberstein at Merck Manual, migraines can become “worse with exertion,” and cause sensitivity to light, among other troubling elements that may become tougher as a hockey player.

Former Denver Broncos running back Terrell Davis ranks of the most memorable cases of a professional athlete suffering from migraines, as he missed the second quarter of Super Bowl XXXII (1998) with severe issues.

Under certain alignments, the Flyers were equipped to boast some appealing center depth, as Sean Couturier could occasionally allow Claude Giroux to flourish on the wing, while expensive new forward Kevin Hayes would possibly serve as 2C. In that scenario, the hope was that Patrick would flourish as a third-line center against lesser competition.

This obviously throws a wrench in that plan, but here’s hoping that Patrick can find a way to manage those migraine issues and get back on track as the second overall pick of the 2017 NHL Draft.

Patrick provided limited offense so far in his career (30 points as a rookie in 2017-18, 31 last season), and didn’t really distinguish himself with middling possession stats, but there’s still plenty of room to grow. This is a discouraging update in that regard, though.

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Flyers counting on new coach Vigneault to lead them to title

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PHILADELPHIA — The parent company of the Philadelphia Flyers has spent the weeks leading up to the season unveiling the team’s best offseason acquisitions.

There are $25 tickets at a refurbished standing-room-only area at the highest point inside the Wells Fargo Center. Too far away for a good view? No worries, Comcast Spectacor installed a Kinetic 4K center-hung scoreboard that makes Gritty look like Godzilla on the big screen. There’s even a sports book for fans who want to place a wager on the home team while they’re sipping a craft cocktail called ”The Sexy Franklin .”

But the $265 million overhaul to the arena the Flyers share with the 76ers hasn’t exactly trickled down to the roster. The top-shelf amenities, fireplaces and artwork serve as nothing more than posh diversions from the action on the ice. The Flyers are +3600 to win it all and there isn’t an arena upgrade that can save that number.

The Flyers haven’t won the Stanley Cup since 1974 and 1975, currently the fourth-longest drought in the NHL. The Flyers missed the playoffs for the fourth time in seven seasons, haven’t made it to the second round since 2012 and will hit 10 years this season since their last Stanley Cup Final appearance.

The new addition the Flyers are really counting is the one on the bench.

Alain Vigneault, known for quick fixes and who led Vancouver and the New York Rangers to the Stanley Cup Final, was hired as the latest coach. Vigneault certainly boasts the credentials that prove he’s capable of turning the Flyers into winners. He has coached 16 NHL seasons for the Montreal Canadiens, Canucks and Rangers and his teams have made the playoffs 11 times.

”He’s a coach that knows what it takes to go far in the playoffs and win,” Flyers center Sean Couturier said.

The Flyers’ gamble on college coach Dave Hakstol backfired and so did their commitment to former general manager Ron Hextall when he laid out a long-term rebuilding plan that was short on immediate playoff results. The Flyers hired Chuck Fletcher last December in hopes he can resuscitate the franchise and make the orange-and-black again known for more than their googly-eyed mascot.

The champion St. Louis Blues showed it could be done – they were the worst team in the NHL in January.

The Flyers hope their hectic early season travel schedule doesn’t derail their efforts: Philadelphia plays a final preseason game in Switzerland, opens the season in the Czech Republic, plays one home game on Oct. 9 and then heads to Western Canada for three games in five days. Did someone say jet lag?

WHO’S HERE

Vigneault. F Kevin Hayes, D Matt Niskanen, D Justin Braun. Hayes signed a $50 million, seven-year contract that’s worth $7.14 million a season. Hayes became the Flyers’ third-highest paid player behind captain Claude Giroux and winger Jakub Voracek and steps in as their new No. 2 center behind Couturier. He’s coming off a career-high 55 points last season with the Rangers and Jets.

WHO’S NOT

Kate Smith. Don’t laugh. Smith’s connection with the Flyers started in 1969 and her rendition of ”God Bless America” was a popular ritual through the years. She even had a statue across the street from the stadium in the sports complex. But the statue was yanked amid allegations of racism against the 1930s star and her video recording will not be played again. D Radko Gudas, C Jori Lehtera and D Andrew MacDonald are among the notable departures.

KEY PLAYERS

All eyes are the 21-year-old Hart, who is expected to steady one of the shakiest positions throughout most of the franchise’s history. He stopped his first 25 shots in preseason action and looks capable of becoming a top-tier goalie. The Flyers used an NHL-record eight goalies last season, but Carter was by far the best and showed enough flashes of promise that he could possibly steal a playoff spot for the Flyers.

OUTLOOK

The Flyers are trying to shift from building to trying to contend for a title. Hextall’s regime was about drafting and developing, and Fletcher is turning his attention to making Philadelphia a playoff contender again. The Flyers should at least contend for one of the final playoff spots in the East and could snag one if once-prized prospects Shayne Gostisbehere and Nolan Patrick play to their potential.

PREDICTION

Gritty will entertain the heck out of sports fans like no other mascot. As such, Gritty will continue to be must-see – but his postseason debut will have to wait at least one more season.

Previewing the 2019-20 Philadelphia Flyers

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(The 2019-20 NHL season is almost here so it’s time to look at all 31 teams. We’ll be breaking down strengths and weaknesses, whether teams are better or worse this season and more!)

For more 2019-20 PHT season previews, click here.

Better or Worse: Better, although it remains to be seen if the Flyers get their money’s worth.

Kevin Hayes has a strong chance to serve as an elusive 2C, but there will be significant pressure stemming from a risky contract that carries a $7 million AAV. How you grade other moves comes down to taste. Is Matt Niskanen due for a bounce-back season, or did the Flyers just waste money and flexibility on a downgrade from Radko Gudas? Alain Vigneault brings name recognition and decent resume to the table, but his teams have often been swamped from a possession standpoint. We may look back at this situation and realize that Scott Gordon might have been the better option.

Strengths: If everything breaks right, the Flyers have a nice mix of veterans with enough left in the tank (Claude Giroux, Jakub Voracek, James van Riemsdyk), players in the meat of their primes (Sean Couturier, Shayne Gostisbehere), and young talent about to make the leap (Carter Hart, Ivan Provorov, Travis Konecny).

Nolan Patrick has been a bit of a disappointment, but with Couturier taking 1C and Hayes slotting in at 2C, the second overall pick of the 2017 NHL Draft may flourish against lesser competition.

If everything pans out, the Flyers could have a nice mix of scoring, modern-style defense, and goaltending. I’d expect a lot of the things that went wrong in 2018-19 to correct in 2019-20, though it’s possible that the Flyers’ outlook was inflated a bit by a lot going right in 2017-18.

Weaknesses: There are reasons to wonder if certain players are overrated. Management may have put too much stock in Niskanen and Justin Braun, two players who’ve had a rough go of things lately and are 32. Even Ivan Provorov might not be quite as dynamic as many believe.

Rolling with Carter Hart is mostly smart, but it’s unsafe to merely assume that he’ll have a strong season. He’s still pretty wet behind the ears, and was actually struggling a bit in the AHL with a .902 save percentage before his big call-up. Brian Elliott isn’t exactly the greatest safety net either, considering his struggles on the ice lately — when he can even be healthy enough to suit up.

It’s also fair to worry about Father Time limiting the likes of Giroux and Voracek, not just players like Niskanen. Even JVR is already 30.

Frankly, recent experience points to Vigneault being a weakness, especially if he indulges in too much of a fixation with fighters, as he notoriously did with Tanner Glass in New York.

[MORE: 3 Questions | Under Pressure | Patrick the X-factor]

Coach Hot Seat Rating (1-10, 10 being red hot): Hiring Alain Vigneault felt like one of several Flyers moves based on reputation and name recognition. Ron Hextall had introduced the rare concept of “patience” to this often-impetuous franchise, yet Chuck Fletcher is bringing a nostalgic air of chaos. I’d expect Vigneault to be fairly safe in his first year, so let’s put him at three.

Three Most Fascinating Players: Hart, Patrick, Sanheim.

The Flyers have a lot hinging on Hart, so we’ll see if he can justify his pedigree, and all of the relief people felt when he looked so promising late last season. It figures to be a less volatile situation than last season’s rotation of eight goalies, but that doesn’t mean it’s a guaranteed success.

Fans would be wise not to daydream too much about how much more potent this Flyers team would look with Miro Heiskanen (third overall) or Elias Pettersson (fifth overall) instead of Patrick at that second pick from 2017. Even if you can ignore such painful thoughts, the bottom line is that Philly needs more from the 21-year-old.

During Gordon’s interim run, Sanheim got a big bump in stature, and he delivered with promising play. Will that carry over with AV, or will Sanheim sink?

Playoffs or Lottery: The Flyers figure to be a bubble team not unlike what they were in 2017-18. While I’m not sure they’ll make the playoffs, that seems like a safer bet than Philadelphia being lottery-bound.

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.