Can Max Domi continue current offensive pace?

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At his end of season press conference last April, Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin talked about needing to fix his team’s attitude. Eyebrows were raised, and many questioned what he meant by that. He ended up dealing Alex Galchenyuk and Max Pacioretty to Western Conference teams. In return for Galchenyuk, he managed to land Max Domi from the Arizona Coyotes. At the time, the trade was met with skepticism. Galchenyuk was coming off a down year, but Domi had only scored nine times in 82 games during the 2017-18 season. Well, the trade couldn’t have worked out any better after the first month of play.

Domi, 23, has been incredible for the Canadiens. Not only has he brought a fresh attitude to this group, he’s also been the most productive player on the team by a mile. The fourth-year NHLer has already matched his goal total from last season, as he’s found the back of the net nine times in just 17 games with the Canadiens. Also, he leads the team in points with 21.

What makes this even more impressive, is that he’s done it while playing center for a team that was lacking depth at that position in a bad way. Despite playing with an inconsistent Jonathan Drouin on his left side, Domi has managed to produce on a nightly basis. Of the 17 games he’s played this season, Domi has failed to collect a point in just three contests.

As of right now, only eight players have collected more points than Domi. The biggest question is whether or not he can keep it up. Let’s take a look at the advanced numbers.

The first stat we’ll look at, is shooting percentage. Right now, the average shooting percentage across the NHL is 9.8 percent. Domi’s shooting percentage is currently 25 percent. Yowza! Over the course of his career, he’s never had a shooting percentage higher than 11.5 percent, and that came during his rookie season. Combine the shooting percentage with the fact that he’s shooting the puck more than ever, as he’s averaging 2.12 shots per game. His previous career-high was 1.93. Even if he keeps shooting more than he has in previous years, it’s hard to envision him finishing with 43 goals (that’s what he’s on pace for right now).

His PDO (shooting percentage + his goalie’s save percentage when he’s on the ice) also indicates that his offensive totals could come down in the near future. Every player’s PDO should finish around the 100-mark. Domi’s PDO is currently at 104.5, which, again, means there’s likely some regression coming. So yeah, a 101-point season isn’t likely.

Even if his numbers drop at some point, it doesn’t mean that Domi will totally fall off the grid. Coming into this season, Canadiens fans would have taken a 55-60 point season from their new forward. If he hits those numbers, the trade ends up being a home run for Bergevin after one year.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Tomas Tatar scores winning goal in Max Pacioretty’s return to Montreal

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It was a big night in Montreal on Saturday as Max Pacioretty made his first visit to the Bell Centre in an opposing sweater. Even though he seemed determine to score in his first game against the Canadiens since the September 10 trade that sent him to Vegas (he recorded a game-high nine shots on goal!), it was one of the players he was traded for that ended up stealing the night and scoring the big goal against his former team.

Tomas Tatar, whose 2018-19 redemption tour continues following a disappointing run with the Golden Knights a year ago, scored his seventh goal of the season mid-way through the third period to help lift the Canadiens to a come-from-behind 5-4 win.

It was a fortunate bounce as he was actually trying to make a pass across the ice to a teammate, but that still had to feel good for Tatar. Really good.

Vegas paid a huge price for him at the trade deadline a year ago (sending three draft picks, including a first-rounder to the Detroit Red Wings) and it never really seemed to work out for him or the team. In 20 regular season games after the trade he recorded just four goals and two assists, and then saw his role greatly reduced in the playoffs to the point where he was at times a healthy scratch.

Not what anybody expected in early March.

After all of that, Vegas included him in the trade package with Montreal in exchange for Pacioretty, which seemed to be a pretty strong deal for the Golden Knights.

All Tatar has done over the first month of the season with Montreal is score seven goals to go with eight assists in his first 17 games with the team.

Pacioretty, for what it’s worth, is off to a tough start in Vegas and has just two goals (and no assists) in his first 13 games with the team. He signed a long-term contract extension with Vegas just after the trade.

Look, it is still very early in the season. At some point Pacioretty is going to start scoring goals again and he could still go on to be a huge part of the Golden Knights over the next few seasons (at least, he better be given the price Vegas paid for him and the contract they gave him).

Tatar will also probably cool off at some point from this current pace.

But what has gotten lost in all of this, from the initial trade to Vegas, to his struggles with the team, to his inclusion in the Pacioretty trade, is that Tatar is a really good hockey player.

He has been a really good hockey player throughout his entire career and has been a lock for at least 20 goals every year he has been a full-time player in the league. That is no small accomplishment. Vegas took too much heat for what it gave up for him at the deadline, he took too much heat for hitting a cold spell after the trade at the wrong time of year, and so far Montreal looks to have done very well for itself in a tough trade it ended up having to make.

It all really worked out in Montreal’s favor on Saturday.

MORE: Your 2018-19 NHL on NBC TV schedule

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Scheifele, Morrissey explain what Oates will bring to LA Kings

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WINNIPEG — Mark Scheifele texts back and forth with Adam Oates nearly every day.

The two review clips Oates has cut for the Winnipeg Jets forward, and Oates offers some ideas of small adjustments Scheifele can make in practice to help better translate to game nights.

As one of several clients of Oates Sports Group, a boutique hockey agency that offers a wide range of amenities for players — from skill development right up to player representation — it’s Scheifele’s tight-knit relationship with Oates as they work on the finer points of his game that’s turned the 25-year-old into one of the NHL’s elite centers.

“I think that’s one of the biggest things, that he gives you active, constructive things to work on a daily basis than just going out and skating,” Scheifele said. “Skate with a purpose, work on the things that are going to benefit your game, in-game.”

Scheifele linked up with Oates three years ago in an effort to further his on-ice product. What drew him — and likely a list of 20 or so other NHLers to the Hockey Hall of Famer — was Oates’ history in the league, an illustrious career and one of the best to ever do it.

“That’s first and foremost,” Scheifele said. “He’s one of the best passers of all time. He’s felt it. He knows what it is like to be in certain situations. He can still actually, physically do it, one thing I think he still does really well. And he’s really smart, a hard-working hockey mind that understands the game so well. He can watch it and read it at a different pace than everyone else.”

[RELATED: Oates joins Kings as skills and development consulatant

Oates was a prolific forward who terrorized defenseman. The slick-skating, pinpoint passer amassed 1,079 assists and 1,420 points in 1,337 games during his 19-year tenure. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2012.

Oates’ ability to slice his way through defenders drew Josh Morrissey in, too.

Winnipeg’s top shutdown rearguard has made a name for himself when it comes keeping the NHL’s best off the scoresheet on a nightly basis — something that rarely happened to Oates.

“He’s one of the best forwards of all time, he knows how to beat you,” Morrissey said. “He knows what forwards are trying to do to you and knows how to try and avoid that kind of thing.”

Being the burgeoning defenseman that he is, Morrissey wanted in on the tutelage. The 23-year-old claims Oates’ advice is largely rudimentary.

“Defensively, just a few little skating things, avoiding injury by having your head up more, controlling the puck more by changing your stick a little bit,” Morrissey said. “Things to make your game more efficient.”

Supplementary to one’s overall game?

“Exactly,” he said. “It’s like a strength coach or a nutritionist that you have back home during the summer.”

Morrissey said there was a controversy a few years ago surrounding whether teams liked their players working with Oates or not.

“The thing I can attest to, personally, from having worked with him, is that it has nothing to do with anything systematically, it’s just little skills and things like that,” Morrissey said.

Oates isn’t trying to re-invent the wheel, per se. He’s just trying to perfect it.

So why are two of Winnipeg’s stars talking about Oates?

Mostly because I asked them to after the Los Angeles Kings hired Oates as a consultant for skills development and to help the team’s ailing power play earlier this week, just two days after they fired head coach John Stevens and assistant Don Nachbaur, replacing them with Willie Desjardins and Marco Sturm.

But also to get some insight as to why a team as a whole might want his services.

Both are happy to see an important asset to their careers find work with the Kings.

“I personally think it was a great play by L.A.,” Scheifele said of bringing Oates aboard. “Smart play there by them. He’s got a lot of knowledge.”

Judging by some of the names under Oates’ wing — Steven Stamkos, Jack Eichel and Max Pacioretty, to name a few — it seems like a bona fide no-brainer.

Morrissey said it’s a running joke among those who train with Oates that they wish they could just keep him to themselves.

“Because he’s so smart,” Morrissey said. “But I’m happy for him getting that role.”

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

What’s going on with Carey Price?

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The Montreal Canadiens were expected to be one of the bottom-dwellers in the Eastern Conference this season. Instead, they’ve proven everybody wrong by getting off to an 8-5-3 start. Nothing to complain about in Montreal then, right? Guess again!

After they traded away their two best scorers in Max Pacioretty and Alex Galchenyuk, the expectation was that they’d have a hard time putting the puck in the net. That hasn’t been an issue. The Shea Weber injury was also supposed to derail their season, but the defense has sort of held up until now. So what’s the big issue that has fans up in arms? Apparently, it’s Carey Price.

Let’s make one thing clear: Price hasn’t been good enough this season. That has never been more evident than over the last few days, as he gave up bad goals in the third period against the New York Rangers on Tuesday night.

And he also gave up a couple of stinkers in Thursday’s 6-5 overtime loss to the Buffalo Sabres on home ice:

Golden Knights’ Haula stretchered off ice after hit, awkward fall

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Erik Haula had to be stretched off the ice after a seemingly innocuous hit sent him to the ice writhing in pain in Toronto on Tuesday.

Patrick Marleau made the check on Haula, who skating through the neutral zone toward the Maple Leafs zone. The check itself, while hard, appeared to be your standard, run-of-the-mill hit, but the result was Haula’s skate getting turned around and caught along the boards followed by his knee buckling underneath him as he fell to the ice.

Rogers Centre fell silent while Haula laid motionless on the ice as training staff worked with him. Not long after, a stretcher was brought out to help him off it. Haula waved to the crowd before exiting the rink.

It’s another tough blow for the Golden Knights, who already have Paul Stastny out long-term with a lower-body injury.

Max Pacioretty returned to the lineup for Vegas on Tuesday after missing four games with an upper-body ailment.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck