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Fantasy Hockey: 2018-19 bounce back candidates

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It happens every year. Fantasy hockey GMs draft a guy and expect a lot from him until he falls flat on his face. Oh the frustration. Well, the good news is that we’re here to tell you which of those players will bounce back in a big way in 2018-19.

Here’s the top bounce back candidates for the upcoming season:

Max Pacioretty – LW – Vegas Golden Knights

Pacioretty went into last season having scored at least 30 goals in each of his previous four seasons. Things went off the rails in a hurry in Montreal last season and it led to Pacioretty being traded to the Golden Knights. The incredible thing about Pacioretty’s production, is that it came without him ever having a top-end center. Paul Stastny isn’t necessarily a high-end center, but he’s better than anyone Pacioretty’s played with before. Don’t be surprised if the newest Golden Knight hits 35 this year.

Jonathan Drouin – C/LW – Montreal Canadiens

Drouin had an incredibly difficult first year with the Montreal Canadiens last season. Not only did he have to get used to a new team and new teammates, he also made the move from the wing to center. This preseason, the Canadiens moved him back to the wing and he looks a lot more comfortable. Don’t be surprised if the 23-year-old surpasses the 13 goals and 46 points he put up last year.

[More Fantasy: Pick up the Rotoworld Draft Guide]

Ty Rattie – W – Edmonton Oilers

Rattie comes into this season having put up 19 points in 49 career games in the NHL, but he’s getting the opportunity to play with Connor McDavid this preseason. As you’d imagine, things have gone pretty well. He picked up seven points in his first two exhibition games, so if he sticks with McDavid, there could be some serious fantasy value appeal there.

Elias Lindholm – W – Calgary Flames

Lindholm has been pretty consistent over the last four years. He’s put up between 39 and 45 points with the Hurricanes since 2014-15. Now that he’s with the Flames, he’ll have more offensive talent around, which means there should be more opportunities to pick up points as the season progresses.

Brandon Saad – W – Chicago Blackhawks

Saad had an incredibly disappointing first year back in Chicago. The 25-year-old scored just 18 goals and 35 points after hitting at least 52 points during the previous three seasons. Saad could get an extended look with Patrick Kane to open the season, so the upside for him to hit the 30-goal mark, again, is definitely there.

[More Fantasy: Rotoworld’s DFS Toolkit]

Anthony Beauvillier – W – New York Islanders

Beauvillier ended up finishing last season with a respectable 21 goals and 36 points in 71 games, but he had his share of ups and downs. The Islanders even felt the need to send him back to the minors mid-season. With John Tavares no longer in New York, Mathew Barzal will need someone new to step up. Enter Beauvillier. The 21-year-old could be one of the big surprises of 2018-19.

Kyle Okposo – W – Buffalo Sabres

After reading everything he went through while dealing with a concussion, it’s hard not to feel sorry for Okposo and his family. Now that he’s healthy again, the 30-year-old could get back to surpassing the 20-goal and 50-point marks this season. The Sabres are young, but there’s no denying that they have talent.

Justin Schultz – D – Pittsburgh Penguins

Schultz posted a career-high 12 goals and 51 points two years ago, but those numbers dropped 27 points last season. Of course, he also missed 19 games due to injury. Expecting him to score 51 points again might be a little ambitious, but he should be able to improve last year’s numbers.

Carey Price – G – Montreal Canadiens

The Canadiens probably won’t be a playoff team, but it’s hard to imagine that Price will be worse than he was last year. The 31-year-old had 16-26-7 record with a 3.11 goals-against-average and a .900 save percentage. Yeah, it was a brutal year for him. His new eight-year extension that comes with a cap hit of $10.5 million kicks in this year, so the pressure will definitely be on. Price should be fine.

Matt Murray – G – Pittsburgh Penguins

Murray’s first year as the undisputed starting netminder in Pittsburgh didn’t go so well. He had a solid 27-16-3 record, but that had more to do with the fact that he was on a good team. He added a 2.92 goals-against-average and a .907 save percentage in 2017-18. Now that he’s gone through one year without Marc-Andre Fleury, he’ll be better equipped to handle a heavy workload.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Three questions facing Pittsburgh Penguins

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Three questions for you to ponder as we look ahead to the 2018-19 Pittsburgh Penguins…

1. Which Kris Letang will the Penguins get?

Perhaps one of the more disappointing developments for the Penguins in 2017-18 was the performance of top defenseman Kris Letang. His return to the lineup after missing most of the 2016-17 season (including all of the playoffs) was supposed to be a huge boost to a team that had won the previous two Stanley Cups.

When Letang is on top of his game he is one of the best, most versatile defenders in the entire league with his swift skating and ability to take over a game from the back end.

For whatever reason, he was not that player in 2017-18.

The Penguins — and Letang — knew there would be an adjustment period early in the season as he returned to the lineup from another significant injury, but he never really seemed to be comfortable at any point during the year as his performance was marred by inconsistency.

Overall, it was probably one of the worst single seasons of his NHL career.

[2017-18 review | Under Pressure: Johnson | Breakthrough: Oleksiak]

It should not happen again.

Despite his struggles there is reason to believe he will bounce back (great possession numbers, the fact he will be a full year removed from the injury that sidelined him, just getting a fresh start) and be closer to the player he’s been throughout most of his career. If he is able to do that it would be a massive swing for the Penguins’ defense because there are only a handful of defenders in the NHL capable of reaching the level that Letang does when he is at his best.

2. Will Matt Murray bounce back?

Almost no goalie in the NHL has had a start to their career like the one Matt Murray has had, winning two Stanley Cups while he was still technically considered a rookie.

After the Penguins traded Marc-Andre Fleury to the Vegas Golden Knights as part of the expansion draft process, Murray had his first chance to be the Penguins’ full-time starting goaltender from the start of the season.

It turned out to be a difficult season for him on and off the ice.

His .907 save percentage was one of the lowest marks in the NHL, while his year was interrupted by injury and the sudden passing of his father during the season.

His struggles carried over to the playoffs, where he had been money the previous two seasons as the Penguins were eliminated in the second round by the Washington Capitals.

Even though he’s been around for parts of three seasons now it’s important to remember that Murray is still only 24 years old and has played in fewer than 160 NHL games (including playoffs). In that limited time he has already compiled a pretty impressive resume that includes a pair of championships, and even with his down year in 2017-18, an overall save percentage of .918 in both regular season and playoffs combined. Among goalies that have appeared in at least 100 games during that stretch, that .918 save percentage is 10th in the league. Overall, the early performance is strong even if the sample size is still small.

Now he has to show that the 2017-18 season was the one that was the outlier.

3. Will Derick Brassard be worth the price the Penguins paid?

General manager Jim Rutherford made another blockbuster trade when he landed Derick Brassard from the Ottawa Senators in a massive three-team trade with the Ottawa Senators and Vegas Golden Knights. It resulted in the Penguins giving up a lot of assets, but Brassard was supposed to be the final piece in the Penguins’ quest for a three-peat.

It did not go exactly as planned.

While Brassard was, for the most part, fine for the Penguins, he did not really make the massive impact on the scoresheet that was expected when he was acquired. That resulted in him facing some heat for his performance and probably lowered expectations for him this season.

The crazy thing about all of it is that Brassard’s performance wasn’t as bad as it was perceived to be. Between the regular season and playoffs he recorded 12 points in 26 games (around a 40-point pace over 82 games) and helped create some great chances in the playoffs. He just did not finish or convert on most of them. While that can be frustrating for the team and fans it’s still better than not creating any chances, and it at least offers the hope that he can be even better this season.

There is always an adjustment period for a player joining a new team — especially mid-season — and you probably shouldn’t jump to too many conclusions if there is not an immediate impact.

Because of the conditions on the trade, the Penguins are only on the hook for a $3 million cap hit for Brassard this season, and with the the return of Riley Sheahan and the additions of Matt Cullen and Derek Grant in free agency the Penguins will enter the season with a ton of depth down the middle after their big-two of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin. That depth could result in Brassard getting some time on the wing on one of the top two lines, but his best value to the team is still probably going to be as the third center behind Crosby and Malkin with Sheahan in the fourth spot to help create the matchup problems that made the team so difficult to beat in the 2016 and 2017 playoffs.

Related: Will Sidney Crosby win another scoring title in his career?

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Building off a breakthrough: Jamie Oleksiak

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Pittsburgh Penguins.

One of the biggest factors in the Pittsburgh Penguins’ 2016 and 2017 Stanley Cup runs was the emergence of several young players that provided a spark each season.

In 2016 it was Matt Murray, Bryan Rust and Conor Sheary.

In 2017 it was Jake Guentzel.

All of them played significant roles in the second half of the season and the postseason and provided some huge moments.

They did not really get the same sort of breakthrough from their farm system during the 2017-18 season. Daniel Sprong never really got much of a chance (and when he did, did not provide much offense). Dominik Simon played more, but did not fully capitalized on his opportunities. Zach Aston-Reese flashed some potential, but only appeared in 16 regular games and then had his postseason ended in the second round on the hit that earned Capitals forward Tom Wilson a three-game suspension.

So who was the breakout player on this team that was mostly full of established NHL veterans?

It might have been defenseman Jamie Oleksiak.

[Penguins Day: 2017-18 review | Under Pressure: Jack Johnson | Three Questions]

Oleksiak become one of the Penguins’ latest reclamation projects on defense when they acquired him in December from the Dallas Stars for next to nothing.

If nothing else Oleksiak was a decent gamble because of his size, potential, and previous experience with Penguins defensive coach Sergei Gonchar (they actually played together briefly in Dallas, and Gonchar was intrigued by Oleksiak’s potential). There were enough tools there that it was worth the fourth-round draft pick to see if they could get something extra out of him that Dallas was not. If they couldn’t, it didn’t really cost them anything of significance.

It was the very definition of low-risk, potentially high-reward.

The move definitely seemed to pay off, at least in the short-term.

In his debut with the Penguins Oleksiak played the best hockey of his career and started to show at least some of the potential that made him a first-round pick in 2011. The Penguins gave him more freedom offensively, allowed him to join the rush and jump into the offensive zone, and just kind of turned him loose a little bit. The result was Oleksiak setting a new career high in points (17) and nearly matching his career total prior to the season, finishing as a positive in shot attempt metrics, and looking like he might be able to establish himself as a regular on their blue line.

It earned him a three-year, $6.1 million contract extension this summer.

The reputation of the Penguins’ — and Gonchar’s specifically — ability to work with and improve defensemen has kind of taken on a life of its own over the past year and is starting to become a little overstated. They’re not taking these players and turning them into Norris Trophy contenders or top-pairing defenders. And that is certainly the case with Oleksiak. Even now his best use is probably going to be as a solid third — and perhaps maybe a second — pairing defender. But that is still a big step forward from where he was in Dallas where he was not getting much playing time, was struggling to perform in those opportunities, and didn’t look like he had much of a future in the NHL.

MORE: Will Sidney Crosby win another scoring title in his career?

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Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

It’s Pittsburgh Penguins day at PHT

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Pittsburgh Penguins.

2017-18
47-29-6, 100 pts. (2nd in the Metropolitan Division, 5th in the Eastern Conference)
Playoffs: Lost in six games to the Washington Capitals, second round

IN
Matt Cullen
Jack Johnson
Derek Grant

OUT
Connor Sheary
Matt Hunwick
Tom Kuhnhackl
Carter Rowney
Josh Jooris

RE-SIGNED
Daniel Sprong
Bryan Rust
Riley Sheahan
Jamie Oleksiak
Tristan Jarry
Dominik Simon

The bid for a third straight Stanley Cup title fell short as the Penguins were knocked out by the Washington Capitals, who slayed a demon en route to the franchise’s first championship. 

It was the culmination of an up-and-down season, one that began with a 10-1 thrashing by the Chicago Blackhawks in their second game and saw the Penguins hold a 19-18-3 record as the calendar turned to 2018. Matt Murray, in his first season as the full-fledged No. 1 in net, again battled through injury, giving the team a chance to see Tristan Jarry and Casey DeSmith in extended action.

Meanwhile, the Penguins’ big weapons did as they normally do and dominated in the scoring department. Evgeni Malkin (98 points), Phil Kessel (92) and Sidney Crosby (89) all finished top 10 in scoring in the NHL, with Malkin hitting 40 goals for the first time since 2011-12 and Kessel recording a career high in points.

General manager Jim Rutherford continued his trading ways and added Riley Sheahan and Jamie Oleksiak in separate deals, which turned out to be shrewd moves in helping both the team’s bottom six and blue line. A three-way deal at the NHL’s trade deadline brought Derick Brassard to Pittsburgh, but everyone is still waiting for that move to work within the team’s current setup.

[Under Pressure: Johnson | Breakthrough: Oleksiak | 3 Questions]

As a team that spends to the cap annually, there wasn’t a lot of action in free agency, despite thoughts that Rutherford might swing another trade. Matt Cullen was brought back and Jack Johnson was handed a curious five-year, $16.25 million contract. The Penguins have their core pieces locked up, outside of Jake Guentzel, who’s scheduled to become an RFA next summer. They’re ready for another run and with a GM who’s not afraid to make a bold move to improve his team’s championship chances, it’s easy to see why they’ll once again be in the mix of teams hoping to represent the Eastern Conference in the Cup Final.

Prospect Pool

• Filip Hallander, 18, RW, Timra (SHL) — 2018 second-round pick

If he can come close to the comparisons to fellow Swede Patric Hornqvist, that will bode well for the Penguins in the future, especially since they traded up to draft him. Despite a knee injury that slowed him a bit, Hallander impressed the Penguins with his two-way game. He chipped in nine goals and 20 points in 40 games last season with Timra.

• Calen Addison, 18, D, Lethbridge (WHL) — 2018 second-round pick

An offensive defenseman, Addison scored 11 goals and recorded 65 points for the Hurricanes last season. A puck-mover, he still has a ways to go in improving his defensive game, but with Sergei Gonchar having already worked his magic on a number of the Penguins defenseman, there’s a confidence that Addison’s all-around game can develop.

• Daniel Sprong, 21, RW, Wilkes-Barre (AHL) — 2015 second-round pick

With an eight-game taste last season, Sprong should have a full opportunity to stick with the NHL club this season. Rutherford said in May the 21-year-old winger is expected to be a regular in the lineup in 2018-19. He’s a proven scorer, having netted 32 goals in both his final year in junior and last season in the AHL. The Penguins are more than fine down the middle, so if Sprong can become a reliable producer on the wing.

MORE: Will Sidney Crosby win another scoring title in his career?

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

PHT Morning Skate: Matthews, Leafs talking extension; Scott Foster back in the news

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• This may come to you as a surprise, but the NHL is becoming increasingly reliant on young defensemen. (TSN.ca)

• Speaking of shocking revelations: The Toronto Maple Leafs and Auston Matthews are talking about a contract extension. (Sportsnet)

• The most popular goalie to come out of the 2017-18 season is heading to the Chicago Blackhawks convention. (Sporting News)

• Here are the top contenders for the Rocket Richard Trophy for next season. (Featurd)

• The cost to renovate KeyArena for use by a future NHL team in Seattle is soaring in price. (Sports Illustrated)

• You know what would help appease all sides in the Artemi Panarin situation? A trade, apparently. (Sporting News)

• How the NHL’s new goalie pad size regulation will affect Matt Murray and the Pittsburgh Penguins. (Pensburgh)

• The Ottawa Senators should be avoiding arbitration hearings with both Mark Stone and Cody Ceci. (Ottawa Sun)

• A story on the man who watched every single game Jarome Iginla played for the Calgary Flames. (Calgary Sun)

• The St. Louis Blues have the largest payroll in the NHL currently. (Sports Daily)

• Montreal Canadiens newcomer Max Domi inspired by fellow diabetic Bobby Clarke. (Montreal Gazette)

• The Benn brothers, Jamie and Jordie, received the ultimate Victoria Grizzlies honour. (The Times Colonist)

• The MnM Podcast discusses the best contracts in the NHL. (Last Word on Hockey)

• The 2000 NHL Entry Draft was the worst in Florida Panthers history. Bonus marks if you remember any of these guys and aren’t a Panthers fan. (Litter Box Cats)

• Todd McLellan is under the gun to turn the Edmonton Oilers into a winner. (Edmonton Journal)

• For those done with reading this morning, the new the folks over at GameSpot did a Stanley Cup Final rematch in the upcoming NHL 19 video game.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck