Justin Faulk

Bunch of questions for Hurricanes during offseason

1 Comment

The Carolina Hurricanes continued their strange pattern during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs: during the rare times when they reach the postseason, the Hurricanes have made a big run of it.

It surely was bittersweet to get swept by the Boston Bruins in the 2019 Eastern Conference Final, much like it had been the last time the Hurricanes made the playoffs, when they were swept by the Pittsburgh Penguins, who eventually won the 2008-09 Stanley Cup.

Once the agony and ecstasy wears off from that run and the gutting sweep, the Hurricanes face a difficult task. They must build on this season, and ideally avoid spending another decade between playoff appearances. Most ideally, the Hurricanes would see this as a stepping stone to even bigger things in the future, rather than a peak that they can’t repeat.

Don Waddell is a finalist for GM of the Year, yet some of his toughest work could very well be ahead. It’s one thing to enjoy a Cinderella run, but what about becoming a consistent contender? Let’s consider some of the make-or-break factors and questions.

  • The goalie question(s)

For almost as long as they’d been out of the playoffs, the Hurricanes have grappled with problems in net.

To some surprise, the Petr MrazekCurtis McElhinney tandem eventually worked out for the Hurricanes this season, only crumbling after Round 2.

It could be a short-lived duo, however, as both Mrazek (27) and Curtis McElhinney (35) are scheduled to become unrestricted free agents. Should the Hurricanes bring one or both back? Where does 23-year-old Alex Nedeljkovic (37th overall in 2014) fit in? Would the Hurricanes be better off throwing their names in the Sergei Bobrovsky sweepstakes, or generally going after a bigger name?

There are some definite positives when looking at the Hurricanes’ salary structure at Cap Friendly.

Teuvo Teravainen and Nino Niederreiter are very affordable. Andrei Svechnikov has two more years on his entry-level deal. More or less dead money in Scott Darling and Alexander Semin’s buyout will expire after 2020-21.

Overall, Cap Friendly estimates that the Hurricanes only have about $54.24 million locked up in 14 players, and potential young additions such as Martin Necas should be cost-efficient.

But there are some contracts to hand out beyond whatever Carolina does in net, and Aho is the guy who could break the bank. Evolving Wild’s contract projections place Aho’s next cap hit at a hair above $10M per season, and even if Waddell can waddle that number down a bit, things could get challenging during a summer where other prominent RFAs (Mitch Marner, Patrik Laine, Brayden Point) could serve as the rising tides that lift all boats.

  • Other free agent calls

The Hurricanes also see two veterans eligible for the free agent market, as Justin Williams and Micheal Ferland need new deals. At 37, Williams still brings value, although you could argue that maybe the Hurricanes deployed him in excessively prominent spots at times. Ideally, you probably don’t want Williams on your top PP unit at this phase of his remarkable career. Ferland’s future with Carolina seemed to ebb and flow, with his season ending on such a low note that it might be surprising to see him back.

Then again, maybe that would make his asking price more modest? Teams often covet guys who can score a bit and also deliver hits like these.

  • Ship out some of that defensive surplus?

For some time, people have wondered if the Hurricanes might deal from their position of strength on defense to improve in other areas. That only intensified when they added Dougie Hamilton, who creates a mild logjam with Justin Faulk and Brett Pesce commanding big minutes as a right-handed defensemen.

That really didn’t feel like too much of a good thing during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, though, as Jaccob Slavin and Calvin de Haan rounded out a great group.

Still, it’s fair to continue to ask that question. Faulk’s contract expires after next season, and Hamilton is only locked up through 2020-21. So who knows?

  • Go bold?

Let’s say the Hurricanes still have a decent chunk of change left over after figuring out their goalie situation, signing Aho, and tending to other business.

There’s a difference between bumping against the cap ceiling and dealing with an internal budget, and the question is: did this run inspire owner Tom Dundon to maybe spend a little bit more? The Hurricanes haven’t been named as suitors for the likes of Artemi Panarin and Matt Duchene, but maybe Carolina would hit an even higher level with a gamebreaker added to the mix? They certainly could’ve used just a little more oomph beyond Aho, Teravainen, Svechnikov, and Jordan Staal when the Hurricanes were struggling to score against the Bruins, both on the power play and overall.

Going the trade route could be especially lucrative because the Hurricanes didn’t sell out their 2019 NHL Draft at the deadline. They have three second-round picks thanks to previous moves, so those could be used to sweeten certain deals. After building patiently through the draft for years, the Hurricanes are in a spot where they can be aggressive in seeking more immediate returns.

***

For the most part, the Hurricanes are a young team, and while you never know when everything’s going to click for deep playoff runs, it’s easy to imagine Carolina getting even better.

Then again, the 2008-09 Hurricanes probably thought there would be great days ahead, so it’s all about making the right moves — and getting some good luck.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

One tweak for Blues’ putrid playoff power play

3 Comments

Teams might look at power-play goals as a luxury, at least during the playoffs.

The Boston Bruins, aka owners of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs’ only active unit that’s actually regularly productive, can attest. Despite investing in Tomas Kaberle during the 2011 trade deadline, the Bruins’ power play struggled to the point that people wondered if Kaberle should be benched … but the Bruins won the 2010-11 Stanley Cup nonetheless.

Blues hitting sour notes on power play

Still, every goal counts with things as tight as they are in this postseason, so the St. Louis Blues have to be concerned about their chances of winning a 1-1 series against the San Jose Sharks with a power play that’s ice cold heading into Game 3 on Wednesday (8 p.m. ET; NBCSN; stream here).

You can dice up their numbers in a lot of ways, and most of them are disturbing. The Blues won Game 2 by a score of 4-2 on Monday despite a power play that went 0-for-5, and also allowed a Logan Couture shorthanded goal. After being productive against the Jets in Round 1, St. Louis has gone just 2-for-28 since their tight series against the Stars, and haven’t scored in their last 18 opportunities. The Athletic’s Jeremy Rutherford notes (sub required) that the Blues have only managed a 7-5 shots on goal advantage against the Sharks so far on the PP.

Sometimes it’s best to zoom out a little bit and look at the sheer totals, and that’s not pretty either. Overall during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, the Blues have scored seven power-play goals, while allowing three shorthanded tallies. Not ideal to only manage a +4 differential on the PP two games into Round 3.

The question, then, is: what should the Blues do?

Overall, it’s best not to panic, so head coach Craig Berube’s “just chill out” comments aren’t totally off base.

“Yes, the power play overall — it can be frustrating,” Berube said, via Jim Thomas of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “But the key is, I do not believe that it frustrated our team. And it can’t. You can’t let it happen. They have a great penalty kill over there. They’ve had a real good penalty kill for years.”

Brayden Schenn and others also weighed in on the subject.

Rutherford and Justin Bourne provided a detailed breakdown of some of the Blues’ struggles in that article for The Athletic, and it’s worth a look — for those interested, and even the Blues as a whole.

Move that Tank

But, when I see a struggling power play, I try to take a K.I.S.S. approach of simplicity, and look at who’s shooting, and from where.

Nothing seemed too outrageous when breaking down the Blues’ advanced special teams stats at Natural Stat Trick, and the Blues are smart enough to realize that Vladimir Tarasenko should be firing the puck the most, as he leads the team with 22 PP SOG, blowing away Ryan O'Reilly, who’s in second place with just seven. This isn’t a situation where a team is leaning too much on shots from defensemen (see: Nashville) or making a personnel decision that baffles me every time (Carolina using Justin Faulk on its top unit instead of Dougie Hamilton).

There is one adjustment I’d strongly consider making: get Tarasenko closer to the net, rather than having him running things from the point.

Now, it wouldn’t be surprising if Tarasenko prefers playing the role of power play QB. His passing ability won’t get the same shine as his lethal shooting, but he has strong instincts in that regard. There are less outrageous ideas than “get the puck on Tank’s stick more often.”

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Still, when a power play is struggling, I wonder if the high-danger shooters aren’t getting enough high-danger chances, and I’d wager that Tarasenko would be more of a threat if he was closer to the net, more often. My instinct would be to have him hovering around the right faceoff dot, essentially giving him the photo-negative of Alex Ovechkin shooting from his “office” at the left circle, but honestly, those details are negotiable. The point is that, in my opinion, Tarasenko’s skills would be best used in a spot where it’s that much harder for his shots to be blocked.

The Blues have some nice options on the point, even without Tarasenko. Whether it’s Alex Pietrangelo‘s strong hockey IQ or Colton Parayko‘s rifle of a shot, it’s not as though St. Louis would be totally lost if they weren’t as prone to putting Tarasenko on the point.

This isn’t to say that the Blues don’t let Tarasenko approach the net in these situations, but my advice is simply to get him there more often. Like, preferably all the time.

It might mean that Tarasenko gets fewer actual shots on net, but a lot of times on the power play, it’s about quality over quantity. At this point, it’s tougher for the Blues to argue that the current setup is working, as they haven’t been getting the right quantity of goals on the power play.

***

So, again, there’s value in at least debating smaller tweaks. I could see an argument for an elevation of Robert Thomas, who’s coming into his own as a young forward (Berube didn’t seem to like that). Heck, you could make a case for the other Rob: Robby Fabbri, who for all of his struggles – injuries and overall – is the sort of creative player who might be able to make plays on what sometimes feels like a static power play.

(Granted, Fabbri makes more sense to me as a second PP unit specialist, if he can get back into the lineup.)

But, really, the Blues are probably closer than it might seem to being successful. All they really might need to do is bring Tarasenko closer to the net.

Game 3 of Blues – Sharks takes place on Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET (NBCSN; stream here).

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Bruins vs. Hurricanes: PHT 2019 Eastern Conference Final preview

6 Comments

It’s easy to picture especially swaggery, Boston-sports-spoiled Bruins fans walking into the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs with a mantra: “Just get past the first two rounds.”

On paper, that seemed to be the most treacherous steps in a hopeful path to a championship. Get past the Maple Leafs in Round 1, and then you’d assume they’d need to cross their fingers against the mighty Lightning in Round 2. Oops.

The Bruins figure to be fairly strong favorites heading into their Eastern Conference Final matchup against the Carolina Hurricanes, but if this postseason reinforces any lesson, it’s that it’s dangerous to assume any hockey playoff series is a lock, one way or another.

After all, that mighty Tampa team tumbled against Columbus, who pushed Boston quite a bit in that six-game series. The Hurricanes also dispatched the defending champion Capitals in Round 1, then swept the sweepers in the Islanders.

Despite this Carolina group largely being new to this whole playoff thing, the Hurricanes have shown remarkable resilience in rolling with punches. While other teams might crumble at the loss of a starting goalie, Carolina just kept trucking along. Playing the underdogs against the Bruins likely won’t bother this bunch of jerks.

The Bruins hold home-ice advantage and household names, but these Hurricanes might just make a name for themselves during this series.

SCHEDULE
(All times ET, subject to change):

Thursday, May 9, 8 p.m.: Hurricanes @ Bruins | NBCSN
Sunday, May 12, 3 p.m.: Hurricanes @ Bruins | NBC
Tuesday, May 14, 8 p.m.: Bruins @ Hurricanes | NBCSN
Thursday, May 16, 8 p.m.: Bruins @ Hurricanes | NBCSN
*Saturday, May 18, 7:15 p.m.: Hurricanes @ Bruins | NBC
*Monday, May 20, 8 p.m.: Bruins @ Hurricanes | NBCSN
*Wednesday, May 22, 8 p.m.: Hurricanes @ Bruins | NBCSN

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

OFFENSE

During the regular season, the Bruins scored 259 goals, while the Hurricanes managed 245. The two teams have been neck-and-neck during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, with Carolina averaging 3.09 goals per game, barely ahead of Boston’s 3.08.

There’s no getting around it, and the Hurricanes haven’t tried to ignore it; every team in the league figures to have fits with the Bruins’ big three of Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron, and David Pastrnak. This trio’s mixture of defensive play, finishing ability, passing skills, and all-around hockey IQ is basically unmatched in the NHL right now. (If they have equals, the list is short.)

That said, that big three has been slowed down at times during the postseason, which is a credit to the Maple Leafs and Blue Jackets. Unfortunately for opponents, the Bruins have seen improved support beyond that top line. A strong second line is led by David Krejci, Charlie Coyle is finding nice chemistry with Marcus Johansson on the third line, and Sean Kuraly‘s been able to pitch in some offense, too.

Don’t count out the Hurricanes’ group, though.

Sebastian Aho and Teuvo Teravainen have been very much a dynamic duo in their own right. Jordan Staal‘s defensive game has essentially always been there, and now he’s getting some bounces on offense. There’s plenty of help on the wings, especially if Nino Niederreiter can shrug off a cold streak, and if Andrei Svechnikov and Micheal Ferland can get reasonably healthy.

On paper, the Bruins have the high-end edge, while the Hurricanes’ offensive advantage likely comes in depth. It’s a testament to both teams that, frankly, even those gaps are probably pretty small.

ADVANTAGE: Bruins.

DEFENSE

Despite a staggering array of injuries at times during this postseason run, the Hurricanes have been able to control the puck more often than not thanks to their splendid group of defensemen.

Losing Trevor van Riemsdyk stings from a depth perspective, yet if any team can spread those minutes out, it’s likely Carolina. Jaccob Slavin‘s received some long-deserved mainstream attention for excellent play, but Dougie Hamilton and Justin Faulk have also been excellent during the Rounds 1 and 2. Calvin de Haan and Brett Pesce round out one of the more complete groups we’ve seen since the salary cap was instituted. This group can move the puck, create some offense, and do a solid job of limiting opportunities against. Don’t be surprised if there are long stretches where the Bruins’ forecheck is short-circuited by Carolina’s ability to transition the puck.

The Bruins’ blueline isn’t as versatile, but as a unit, they make life easier for Tuukka Rask, for the most part.

Torey Krug is an absolute weapon on the power play, and effective overall. Charlie McAvoy and Zdeno Chara enjoy an effective, symbiotic relationship when paired together. This is a solid group overall, even though Chara is understandably slowing down at age 42.

ADVANTAGE: Hurricanes, and not just when McAvoy is suspended for Game 1.

GOALTENDING

Both the Bruins and Hurricanes enjoy a luxury that few teams manage: a viable backup.

That proved especially important for Carolina, as Petr Mrazek missed the latter portion of Round 2 against the Islanders, making way for Curtis McElhinney. In a way, that seems quite fitting, as the two made things work in Carolina’s net, often by committee.

With Ben Bishop‘s Stars out, Tuukka Rask seems like the obvious choice for hottest goalie remaining in this postseason. Rask closed out Columbus with a masterful 39-save shutout, pushing his save percentage to a whopping .938 this postseason. He was the story of that Game 6 win, and really that series against the Blue Jackets, in general.

Losing Rask to an injury or slump would be brutal for Boston, yet Jaroslav Halak is a proven veteran who at times outplayed Rask during the 2018-19 regular season. Halak is arguably the second-best goalie in this series.

ADVANTAGE: Bruins. Goalies are a strange lot, though.

SPECIAL TEAMS

The Bruins have generated the best power play percentage (28.6) of these playoffs, and ranked third in the NHL at 25.9 percent during the regular season. The Hurricanes converted on a middling 17.8 percent of their chances during the regular season (12th-worst), and have struggled in the playoffs, only converting on 10.5 percent of their opportunities.

(I’ve screamed from many mountaintops about the Hurricanes needing to move Hamilton to the QB role of its first power play unit in exchange for Faulk. Ultimately, I realize that this is a one-way conversation, as Carolina seems resolute in sticking with what … hasn’t worked.)

The Hurricanes sported the more effective penalty kill (81.6 percent) during the regular season (Boston was at 79.9 percent), while the Bruins have had more success in the playoffs (83.8 percent to Carolina’s 75). Of course, as dangerous as Toronto’s PP talent can be, the Bruins had the advantage of not facing Alex Ovechkin and the Capitals’ man advantage, while Carolina did during seven games in Round 1.

ADVANTAGE: Bruins. The Hurricanes likely have an edge on penalty killing, but it’s incremental. Meanwhile, Boston’s power play may very well swing the series.

PREDICTION

BRUINS IN 7. The Hurricanes aren’t just some Cinderella story running on fumes. Instead, they’re a balanced team that can win battles in all three zones, and that defense gives Carolina a fighting chance against just about any opponent. That said, the Bruins have the big three, more trustworthy goaltending, and a power play that could buy them some precious breathing room. This should be a treat for hockey nerds and casual fans alike.

MORE:
Conference Finals schedule, TV info
PHT Roundtable
Conference Finals predictions

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

The Playoff Buzzer: Hurricanes sweep Islanders; Bishop baffles Blues

3 Comments
  • The Hurricanes wouldn’t be denied, not by Robin Lehner, not by the Islanders. Carolina became the first team to advance to Round 3 this postseason, dispatching the Isles in four games.
  • The Blues couldn’t get much going against the Stars, and when St. Louis did, Ben Bishop was there to clean up the rest. Dallas mostly kept the St. Louis crowd, except for a somewhat strange “Bish-op” chant.

Hurricanes 5, Islanders 2 (Carolina wins series 4-0)

The Hurricanes completed the sweep of the Islanders on Friday. After the Islanders played well in the first period but only managed a 1-1 tie, the Hurricanes scored two quick goals to open the second, and end Lehner’s night early. The Isles never really recovered, eventually falling behind 5-1 before Brock Nelson scored what was basically just a dignity goal. After two tight wins on the road in Brooklyn, the Hurricanes really ran away with the squabbles at home, winning both Carolina contests by scores of 5-2. Carolina only allowed the Islanders five goals all series long, essentially beating Barry Trotz’s team at its own game.

Stars 2, Blues 1 (Dallas leads series 3-2)

The game was at home for St. Louis. The Blues enjoyed a significant advantage in getting man advantages, as they went 0-for-4 on the power play, while Dallas failed to score on just one opportunity. For long swaths of Game 5, the Blues crowd had little to cheer for, as the Stars generally kept the Blues away from high-danger scoring chances. While Ben Bishop coughed up the puck for the Blues’ lone goal after the “Bish-op” chant, it still seemed silly (maybe a little desperate?), as Bishop turned aside whatever rare Grade-A chances St. Louis did manage. The Stars rank as one of the Cinderella stories of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, yet much like the Hurricanes, Dallas sure seems like it belongs deep into Round 2. The Blues will need to be better – and maybe get Bishop off of his game – if they hopes to keep the Stars from getting to Round 3.

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Three Stars

1. Ben Bishop

Honestly, it felt like Bishop beat himself on the only goal the Blues scored, rather than St. Louis really solving him themselves.

That goal still counts, of course, so Bishop won’t get the shutout. He did make 37 out of 38 saves, and while the Stars’ stingy defense deserves partial credit for his strong work, Bishop holds it together. He’s the foundation of the Stars’ often-successful efforts to shut down opposing teams, and that’s not just a riff on Bishop being really, really tall.

Bishop looked a little labored after making a save during Game 4, but if he wasn’t 100 percent in Game 5 on Friday, he had a funny way of showing it. The Stars goalie was rock solid, making tough saves look easy, and rarely giving the Blues much hope of winning.

There’s been some concern about Jordan Binnington‘s play, yet more than any failings by Binnington, the concern might really revolve around how small the margin of error is when Bishop’s at the other end of the ice.

2. Teuvo Teravainen

Let’s consider this a combined second star for Teravainen and Sebastian Aho. Both red-hot Finns scored a goal and an assist in Game 4, enjoyed +2 ratings, and blocked two shots apiece. They’ve been dominant at times during the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs, and it’s nice to see Teravainen get some of the recognition after Aho had risen a bit in the eyes of hockey watchers before him.

I’m giving Teravainen an edge because Aho’s goal was a little funky (it seemed to go off Adam Pelech?), and also because Teravainen’s assist was a primary one, compared to Aho’s helper being secondary.

You could argue for Aho instead, as he doubled Teravainen’s shots on goal (four to two) and enjoyed a strong game in his own right.

It feels worthwhile to wedge one more strong two-point performance from Carolina in this top three, and you could make argument that this player should be in second, instead of the two forwards.

3. Justin Faulk

The Hurricanes have been leaning on their vaunted defense corps as the postseason’s gone along, with Jaccob Slavin getting a ton of recognition, in particular. That’s richly deserved, but Faulk had quite the Game 4, and will probably enjoy the rest that comes from this sweep.

Faulk generated two assists in Game 4, getting a helper on Aho’s power-play goal and the lone assist on Andrei Svechnikov‘s insurance tally in the third period.

Faulk checked all the boxes, really. He logged a game-high 27:07, getting looks on both the power play and penalty kill. Faulk generated a +2 rating, two SOG, seven hits, two blocked shots, and two takeaways in Game 4. None of that is sexier than that goal right after leaving the penalty box from Game 3, but Faulk deserves a mention in the three stars all the same.

Taunt of the Night

In response to Brock Nelson sarcastically tapping Curtis McElhinney on the head after scoring a goal earlier in the series, Hurricanes defenseman Dougie Hamilton returned the favor on Nelson during the handshake line. Savage, Dougie. Savage.

Factoids

Saturday’s games

Game 5: Columbus Blue Jackets at Boston Bruins (Series tied 2-2)  7:15 p.m. ET on NBC (stream here)
Game 5: Colorado Avalanche at San Jose Sharks (Series tied 2-2) 10 p.m. ET on NBCSN (stream here)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

The Playoff Buzzer: Hurricanes keep rolling; Stars get even

Getty
  • The Carolina Hurricanes are one win away from reaching their first Eastern Conference Final since the 2008-09 season.
  • Curtis McElhinney makes some history and Justin Faulk scores a highlight reel goal.
  • The Dallas Stars get even against the St. Louis Blues.

Carolina Hurricanes 5, New York Islanders 2 (CAR leads series 3-0)

The Carolina Hurricanes just keep right on rolling. Thanks to their 5-2 win over the New York Islanders on Wednesday night they are now just one win away from reaching the Eastern Conference Final and continue to write one of the most amazing stories of the 2018-19 season. Justin Williams wanted to see his team play better in Game 3, and they responded with their most complete effort of the series while Williams himself scored the game-winning goal mid-way through the third period.

Dallas Stars 4, St. Louis Blues 2 (Series Tied 2-2)

This game had some pretty intense moments and you can sense the tension rising in what is now a best-of-three series. The Stars were able to get even in their Round 2 matchup against the St. Louis Blues on Wednesday night by jumping all over them early and holding off a late push in the third period. Roope Hintz continued to score goals, Tyler Seguin and Mats Zuccarello both had a pair of points, and John Klingberg scored a beauty of a goal on the rush for what would go on to be the game-winning goal.

[NBC 2019 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Three Stars

1. Jaccob Slavin, Carolina Hurricanes. What a postseason he is having. Slavin added two more assists on Wednesday night to give him a league-leading 12, and also displayed more outstanding defensive zone play without the puck on his stick. He is a workhorse on the Hurricanes’ blue line and was at his best in this game.

2. Tyler Seguin, Dallas Stars. After falling behind early in the first period the Stars stormed back with four consecutive goals, with Seguin picking up the primary assist on Jason Dickinson‘s game-tying goal and John Klingberg’s game-winning goal. The play to set up Klingberg was one of the two pretty goals the Stars scored off the rush on Wednesday night.

3. Teuvo Teravainen, Carolina Hurricanes. Teravainen has become a star for the Hurricanes over the past couple of seasons and one of their go-to offensive players. He made another big contribution on Wednesday night, scoring two goals to give him five this postseason. He opened the scoring early in the first period when he scored right along the goal line, and then added an empty-net goal late in the third period to help put the game away.

Highlights of the Night

This looked to be a sure goal for the Islanders, but Curtis McElhinney had other ideas. Probably the best of his 28 saves on the night.

Just an incredible play by Justin Faulk to fly out of the penalty box, catch the puck in mid-air, quickly drop it to the ice, and then finish the breakaway with a slick move to beat Robin Lehner for a go-ahead goal in the second period.

The future of the Stars’ defense is in good hands with John Klingberg and Miro Heiskanen patrolling the blue line for the foreseeable future. The veteran, Klingberg, scored a beauty of a goal on Wednesday night when he took this perfect pass from Tyler Seguin to beat Jordan Binnington with a perfectly placed shot.

Factoids

  • With his fifth goal of the playoffs on Wednesday night Roope Hintz now has the most goals in a single playoff run for a Stars rookie since the 1993-94 season. [NHL PR]
  • Curtis McElhinny is the oldest goalie in NHL history to win his first Stanley Cup Playoffs start. [Sportsnet Stats]
  • Tyler Seguin has set a career-high for most points in a single playoff year. [NHL PR]
  • The Carolina Hurricanes are now 4-0 at home this postseason and have outscored their opponents by a 17-5 margin [Tom Gulitti]
  • Klingberg’s goal was his second-game winner of the postseason, tying a Stars franchise record for a defender. [NHL PR]

Thursday’s Schedule

Game 4: Boston Bruins at Columbus Blue Jackets, 7 p.m. ET, NBCSN (CBJ leads series 2-1) (Live Stream)
Game 4: San Jose Sharks at Colorado Avalanche, 10 p.m. ET, NBCSN (SJ leads series 2-1) (Live Stream)

 

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.