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It’s Carolina Hurricanes day at PHT

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Carolina Hurricanes.

2017-18

36-35-11, 83 pts. (6th in Metropolitan Division, 10th in Eastern Conference)
Missed playoffs.

IN:

Dougie Hamilton
Micheal Ferland
Adam Fox
Jordan Martinook
Calvin de Haan
Petr Mrazek

OUT:

Noah Hanifin
Elias Lindholm
Marcus Kruger
Jeff Skinner
Derek Ryan
Klas Dahlbeck
Cam Ward
Joakim Nordstrom
Lee Stempniak

RE-SIGNED:

Trevor van Riemsdyk
Phillip Di Giuseppe

The Carolina Hurricanes now sit in the aftermath of one heck of an offseason storm.

A full-blown shake up from top to bottom has the Hurricanes now heading into the 2018-19 with a new head coach, a new general manager and under the direction of a new owner (who took over midway through the season) who appears determined not to let what’s happened for nearly the past decade to continue — missing the playoffs.

Indeed, Bill Peters (who left for Calgary) has been replaced with franchise legend Rod Brind’Amour behind the bench. Don Waddell has taken over Ron Francis’ post (after the latter was relieved of his duties). Tom Dundon, the architect behind the winds of change, became the owner midway through the 2017-18 season. And some of the team’s most well-known names — Cam Ward, Jeff Skinner, Noah Hanifin — won’t be wearing Carolina red this coming season.

[Building off breakthrough | Under PressureThree Questions]

The Hurricanes haven’t graced the playoffs since 2009, and while they put up a bit of a fight down the stretch last season, they never really found the extra gear they needed, eventually finishing sixth in the Metropolitan Division and 10th in the Eastern Conference.

Dundon has employed a hands-on approach to the team he now runs, which perhaps scared away prospective coaches and general managers during searches for both. Brind’Amour is a household name in the franchise, but unproven behind the bench and Waddell… well his track record with other teams isn’t exactly glowing.

That said, Carolina was handed a gift and then some when they moved up from 11th to 2nd in the NHL Draft Lottery and got their hands on Andrei Svechnikov, who scored 40 goals in 44 games in the Ontario Hockey League last season.

Waddell then went out and traded for defenseman Dougie Hamilton to bolster their backend, gaining gritty forward Micheal Ferland and top prospect Adam Fox in exchange for Noah Hanifin and Elias Lindholm. He also signed defenseman Calvin de Haan in free agency and traded away Jeff Skinner just last week for a few picks and a prospect.

While the Skinner trade seemed like a major loss given the return, the Hurricanes do have a bevy of young talent ready to try and make their mark this season. Svechnikov should inject the offense and Martin Necas looks slated to become a top center within the club. Hamilton and de Haan are fine additions on the backend. Ferland adds a little bit of everything. And there’s the wave of youth that’s exciting for any team.

“I don’t want to say it’s a new team, but it will be,” Brind’Amour told NHL.com. “We’ll potentially have 12 new players, so I think everyone’s just excited. There’s been a lot of change, but we’ve done a pretty good job of keeping the pieces we wanted to keep and build around, and then we have a couple young players we’re excited to see, new rookie players that I think will be exciting to watch.”

Prospect Pool

Andrei Svechnikov, RW, 18, Barrie Colts (OHL) – 2018 first-round pick

Svechnikov is the type of elite talent any team would be lucky to have. He has size (6-foot-3), an elite selection of shots, and is crafty both inside and on the perimeter. It’s likely that he steps in right away and begins to contribute offensively this season. Svechnikov had 40 goals and 72 points in 44 games with Barrie this season — name the OHL’s rookie of the year — had four goals and eight points and the world under-18 championships and five assists during the world juniors.

Martin Necas, C, 19, Brno Kometa (Czech) – 2017 first-round pick

Necas has spent the last two seasons playing pro hockey in his native Czech Republic with Brno Kometa, which also features former NHLer Martin Erat. Necas is expected to move into the Hurricanes lineup next season, possibly as the team’s second-line center. Necas had 11 points in seven games at the World Juniors this past year and then five more in the same number of games during the world championships this past spring.

“His game has gotten better, he’s gotten a little bigger, and he’s a lot more confident than he was last year,” Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour told NHL.com. “I think he’s a night-and-day player already from a year ago.”

Adam Fox, D, 20, Harvard University (NCAA) – 2016 third-round pick (Calgary Flames)

There are several players who fit the mold here: D Jake Bean, F Valentin Zykov and F Warren Foegele — but its Fox, who the Hurricanes inherited in the Hamilton trade, that’s intriguing. Fox is widely regarded as one of the top defensive prospects in the NHL, so it’s a good get for a team that gave up quite a bit going the other way. Carolina has amassed quite the stable of defenseman this summer, and Fox fits right into that. He’s spent the last two seasons playing in the NCAA with Harvard where he’s been a point-per-game player on the backend and had five points in seven games for Team USA in a bronze-medal showing at the 2018 World Junior Hockey Championships.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

It’s Arizona Coyotes day at PHT

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Arizona Coyotes.

2017-18
29-41-12, 70 pts. (Last, Pacific Division; Last, Western Conference)

IN:
Alex Galchenyuk
Michael Grabner
Marian Hossa (cap hit only)
Vinnie Hinostroza
Jordan Oesterle

OUT:
Max Domi
Jordan Martinook
Zac Rinaldo
Luke Schenn

RE-SIGNED:
Oliver Ekman-Larsson
Kevin Connauton
Niklas Hjalmarsson
Antti Raanta

The Arizona Coyotes seem to be stuck in a rebuild with no end in sight. Alright, that’s not totally true, but outside of finishing the season strong, it was another long year for the ‘Yotes, who finished at the bottom of the Western Conference. They’ve now missed the playoffs in six consecutive seasons.

GM John Chayka had no choice but to make some heavy moves this off-season. He made a huge splash when he acquired Alex Galchenyuk from the Montreal Canadiens for Max Domi and he followed that up by extending franchise blueliner Oliver Ekman-Larsson.

[Three Questions | Under Pressure | Building Off a Breakthrough]

Galchenyuk found himself in and out of Claude Julien’s dog house last year, but still managed to finish with 19 goals and 51 points in 82 games playing on the wing. The Coyotes have already stated that they plan putting the 24-year-old back at his natural position of center. Playing in a smaller hockey market might just be what the doctor ordered for Galchenyuk.

For Arizona to take the next step, they’re going to need youngsters like Clayton Keller, Christian Dvorak, Christian Fischer, Brendan Perlini, Jakub Chychrun, Dylan Strome and company to continue developing into impact players. There’s talent on the roster, but most of it is young and inexperienced. That’s the biggest issue.

Keller really took the NHL by storm, as he managed to pick up 23 goals and 65 points in 82 games as a teenager in 2017-18. His upside is enormous. Whether or not he can avoid the sophomore slump will be one of the bigger storylines heading into the season for the Coyotes.

The Coyotes also added Marian Hossa’s salary to their payroll, but that was mostly to acquire Hinostroza and Oesterle, who could turn out to be nice complimentary pieces at some point.

Last year, the team decided to commit to Raanta as their starting goaltender, but they also added Darcy Kuemper to the fold before the trade deadline. It’ll be interesting to see how Raanta and Kuemper end up splitting the workload. Neither of them has much experience as a starting netminder at the highest level, so expect there to be some prolonged struggles at times.

Prospect Pool

• Barrett Hayton, C, 18, Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (OHL) – 2018 first-round pick

The Coyotes surprised some people when they used the fifth overall pick on Hayton, but they clearly had their sights set on adding another center. Hayton is a dynamic offensive talent with speed to burn. He finished sixth in on the Greyhounds in points despite being just 17 years old for the entire season. Hayton might simply head back to junior next season, but the Coyotes could also opt to give him a serious look in training camp.

Nick Merkley, W, 21, Tucson Roadrunners (AHL) – 2015 first-round pick

Outside of the lower-body injury that ended his season prematurely, Merkley’s introduction to pro hockey went pretty well. He suited up in just 38 games with the Roadrunners last season, but he managed to score 18 goals and 39 points. The young forward failed to collect a point in one game with the ‘Yotes. He could probably use some more time in the AHL to round out his game, but his offensive ability might be enough to get him on the opening night roster.

Kyle Capobianco, D, 20, Tucson Roadrunners (AHL) – 2015 third-round pick

After putting up a point-per-game season in the OHL in 2016-17, Capobianco made the leap to the pro ranks by picking up two goals and 30 points in 49 games last season. Like Merkley, Capobianco also got a one-game taste of the NHL last season. Although there’s nothing wrong with his offensive instincts, he’ll have show that he’s capable of playing consistently well in his own zone if he’s going make the leap to the NHL this year.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Locking up Ekman-Larsson is a must for Coyotes

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The Arizona Coyotes haven’t been good in quite some time. The last time they came close to making the playoffs was in 2013-14 when they finished two points short. On the bright side, they have some quality young players coming through the organization, but it won’t mean much if they can’t lock up the most important piece of the puzzle to a long-term extension.

Defenseman Oliver Ekman-Larsson is about to enter the final year of his current deal. He’ll make $5.5 million this season, which means he’s in line for a huge raise. According to TSN hockey insider Bob McKenzie, the ‘Yotes are offering their franchise blue-liner an eight-year, $66 million to stay in the desert. With Arizona being a budget team, you’d have to wonder if they could go much higher than that (probably not).

It’s up to the 26-year-old to decide if he wants to be part of this rebuild or if he wants to go elsewhere so he can win right away.

Ekman-Larsson has been consistent when it comes to putting up offensive numbers. Since 2013-14, he’s scored at least 12 goals in each season and he’s put up over 40 points in all but one season (he had 39 in 2016-17). Those are strong numbers for a defenseman.

But his biggest value comes in the form of making his teammates better.

Of the 10 Arizona skaters that played at least 285 minutes with Ekman-Larsson, nine of them had better CF% with him than without him. That’s not an insignificant number. Jason Demers, who spent more time on the ice with him than any other player (949:39), had a CF% of 52.42 with Ekman-Larsson and 48.57 without him, according to Natural Stat Trick.

Clayton Keller, who was on the ice at the same time as Ekman-Larsson for 418:52, had the biggest dip in CF% without the Swedish defender. With him, Keller had a CF% of 54.59, but without him it sunk to 44.73.

Derek Stepan, Max Domi, Christian Dvorak, Brendan Perlini, Brad Richardson, Jordan Martinook and Christian Fischer are all in the same boat. They posted better numbers with Ekman-Larsson by their side. When you look at individual FF% for Coyotes players, the results are very similar. Most are better with him than without him. It’s totally normal, he’s clearly their best player.

It’s now up to Ekman-Larsson to decide whether or not he’s going to commit to this organization long term. It’s fully in his right to leave if he’d like to. He’s stuck around and played on some very mediocre teams.

Here’s what McKenzie had to say about the timing of this entire situation:

Last I heard he was in France on a vacation and I’m not sure if there’s a specific timeline here, but I would have to think in the next week or two the Coyotes want to know from Ekman-Larsson and his representatives if he’s prepared to commit to that long-term deal with Arizona. Because if he’s not, then there’s no doubt in my mind that Arizona will try to trade him and I believe that Arizona has kept its options open in that regard and I don’t think that they’re being real proactive out there picking up the phone and calling teams and saying, hey do you want to trade for Ekman-Larsson? But I think they’re well aware of which teams are interested in [him] and that there’s ongoing dialogue that if a trade should become necessary, how they might go about it.

If he’s not committed to staying in Arizona, GM John Cheyka will have no problem finding a trade partner for his services. The only issue is, they’re probably going to get a package of young players and draft picks for him. How much longer will Coyotes fans have to wait before the team becomes competitive?

Clearly, the Coyotes realize that bringing him back is the way to go. Now all they have to do is convince his camp to sign on the dotted line.

MORE:
• NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub
• Stanley Cup Final Guide

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

PHT Morning Skate: Montgomery’s determination; Marchand’s top heel moments

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Wild head coach Bruce Boudreau has a close eye on the ECHL playoffs because his son, Ben, is an assistant coach with the Fort Wayne Komets. (Journal Gazette)

• Former Notre Dame captain and Canadiens prospect Jake Evans underwent sports hernia surgery. He’s expected to miss 12 weeks. (Montreal Gazette)

• Now that the Stars GM Jim Nill has hired a head coach, there’s a few things he needs to sort out. He’ll need to help Jim Montgomery find new assistant coaches, he has to look for a backup goalie, he’ll have to decide what he wants to do with Jason Spezza and more. (Dallas News)

• Why is the series between the Sharks and Golden Knights tied up at two after four games? (NBC Sports Bay Area)

• Some unwanted intruders attempted to break into Milan Lucic‘s house, but thankfully they failed. (Oilers Nation)

• One reason why the Lightning are up in their series against the Bruins is because they’ve been so effective on the forecheck. (NHL.com)

• Despite the fact that a Canadian team hasn’t won the Stanley Cup since 1993, they still manage to bring in more revenue than most American teams. (Financial Post)

• As you’re probably aware, Brad Marchand isn’t very popular with opposing players and fans, and there’s a number of reasons for that. ESPN looks at Marchand’s top 20 heel moments. Slew-footing, clotheslining, elbowing, it’s all there! (ESPN)

• Leaving Arizona won’t be easy for Jordan Martinook, but he’s looking forward to life in Carolina. (Raleigh News & Observer)

• Some of Jim Montgomery’s friends in Montreal share their stories about how his determination got him to where he is now. (Montreal Gazette)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

Coyotes acquire Kruger in deal with Hurricanes for Martinook

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Carolina Hurricanes have acquired left wing Jordan Martinook from the Arizona Coyotes in exchange for center Marcus Kruger.

Under terms of the deal announced Thursday, the teams also swapped later-round draft picks and the Hurricanes will retain 10 percent of Kruger’s salary, or about $300,000 of the roughly $3 million Kruger is set to make in 2018-19.

The 25-year-old Martinook had six goals and nine assists in 81 games during his fourth NHL season.

Kruger had one goal and five assists in his only season with the Hurricanes, who acquired him last summer from Vegas in exchange for a draft pick.