Jack Eichel

Consistency is key as Eichel eyes end to Sabres’ playoff drought

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One of the main goals Jack Eichel believes that the Buffalo Sabres need to reach in 2019-20 is finding consistency in a positive way. Points dropped are points dropped and teams can leapfrog you in the standings easily if you’re going through a bit of a skid.

“There’s going to be games this year where we don’t have it — maybe we’ve been on the road, maybe we’ve been traveling, maybe it’s a back-to-back,” Eichel told NBC Sports during the NHL Player Media Tour earlier this month. “It’s a long season and every night’s not your best night. The best teams find ways to scratch a point out here or there or maybe win a game that they don’t deserve to win. For us, it’s about doing that, finding consistency night in and night out and giving ourselves the best chance to have success.”

The Sabres felt both ends of the consistency scale in 2018-19. After the first two months of season they were top of the NHL, powered by a 10-game win streak. Everything was going well and the dream of ending their then seven-season playoff drought was alive.

When the Sabres went for win No. 11 in a row against Tampa Bay in late November, that’s when the wheels began to fall off. That night would be the start of a five-game losing streak and a final 57-game stretch where Buffalo would tumble down the Eastern Conference standings, winning consecutive games only twice the rest of the season and losing 15 of their last 19 games.

A summer of change saw head coach Phil Housley replaced by Ralph Krueger and general manager Jason Botterill add Jimmy Vesey and Marcus Johansson up front, while bolstering the blue line with the acquisitions of Colin Miller and Henri Jokiharju. Jeff Skinner was also re-signed long-term.

Eichel was impressed when he met with Krueger in Slovakia during the IIHF World Championship last spring. A chat over coffee turned into a multi-hour conversation ranging from hockey to politics to classic rock music.

“He’s so smart, he’s so intriguing as a person,” Eichel said. “I think he has a great vision for our group and I think all the guys are going to respond really well to him.”

[MORE: Krueger holds key to unlocking Sabres’ potential]

Eichel will have a close relationship with Krueger as the team’s captain. His first season wearing the ‘C’ was a mixed one. Personally, the 22-year-old forward hit career highs in goals, assists, and points, but that success came as the team he was leading stumbled in the final three-quarters of the season.

Year one as captain was a learning experience for Eichel. He understood the pressures that come with the captaincy, and now he feels he’s better prepared for the responsibilities that come with the role.

“I felt like I needed to up my game for our team to have success,” he said. “Unfortunately, we struggled in the second half, but the first half of the year a lot of things went well. [We’ve got to] try to emulate that for a full season this year.”

Eichel got a close-up view of what success in the NHL looks like in June. He was in attendance for Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final at TD Garden cheering on former teammates Ryan O'Reilly (Sabres) and Matt Grzelcyk (Boston University). That experience has only motivated him even more.

The Sabres have made the postseason only once since Terry Pegula purchased the franchise in Feb. 2011. Money has been spent to try and turn the team into a consistent winner, but that’s failed so far. There’s still plenty of roster reshaping for Botterill to do, but another lost season in Buffalo could lead to more changes, and the players understand the pressure to win in the city and what’s at stake this season.

“It’s almost impossible to not feel it,” Eichel said. “With the drought that our franchise has been in for the playoffs, the ups and downs we’ve went through, being a high pick and coming in with a lot of these new young players like Rasmus [Dahlin], I think that we feel pressure to perform and bring success to Buffalo. 

“It can be tough at times, but sometimes it brings the best out of you and brings out the competitive side. We want to win. We want to win bad.”

MORE:
Previewing the 2019-20 Buffalo Sabres
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Blues’ O’Reilly has ‘another gear’ after being playoff MVP

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Ryan O’Reilly stockpiled quite the hardware to show off at his Stanley Cup day.

On display next to the Cup he helped the St. Louis Blues win in June were the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP and the Selke Trophy as the NHL’s best defensive forward. Any player would gladly celebrate with those shiny centerpieces, though O’Reilly — at 28 and on his third team — is only now showing he is this kind of elite player.

“I still think I have another gear to get to, and that’s my plan,” O’Reilly said. “There’s still many things to improve on. There are areas to be better. One thing, too, is I think power-play production for myself could’ve been a lot better, and that’s an area I need to grow. There’s some stuff I’ve been working on to try to improve that.”

O’Reilly had nine points in the Cup Final against Boston playing through a cracked rib. He was nearly a point-a-game player during the regular season. Yet, somehow he still seemed underappreciated outside his peers.

“People didn’t realize how good of a player Ryan O’Reilly was until this year,” Vancouver forward Bo Horvat said. “All the players knew how good he was and how big of a part of that team he was and how special of a player — just his two-way game, his faceoffs. Obviously his point production this year was outstanding. His play in the playoffs, winning MVP and obviously the Stanley Cup, it was a great year for him and I think he opened up a lot of eyes.”

O’Reilly said he figured something out during the playoffs: how to clear out some “garbage” in his brain to focus on what matters. The challenge now is trying to duplicate that during an 82-game regular season.

“Just go out there and completely be in the moment and go from there,” O’Reilly said. “That’s a big lesson for myself, trying to establish that more. Be clear and find a way to take all the noise and all the stuff that you don’t need in your head and just throw it out. It just seems like when I did that, I tend to get more bounces and things went my way.”

Winning the Selke was evidence enough of O’Reilly’s strong regular season. He ranked eighth in the league in faceoffs, which is part of what makes him so tough to play against.

“He’s just so competitive on draws,” Chicago captain Jonathan Toews said. “I’m one of those guys I want to start every shift with the puck and if we’re going up against a guy like that that could catch fire, and we might be chasing it down for a whole period. He’s obviously not one of the fastest guys out there, but he’s so good positionally and just aware of where guys are and what to do with the puck. I think he’s just an all-around super intelligent player.”

Nathan MacKinnon

Already considered one of the fastest hockey players on earth, MacKinnon carried the Colorado Avalanche to within one victory of the Western Conference final and is the biggest reason they’re a fashionable Cup contender this season. Fellow Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia, native Sidney Crosby said MacKinnon is in the category of Pittsburgh teammate Evgeni Malkin and Edmonton star Connor McDavid as players who can take over games.

“We saw a pretty good glimpse of that in the playoffs,” Crosby said. “He did it consistently. … I’d expect him to take another big step.”

Rookie Avalanche defenseman Cale Makar said it’s electrifying to watch MacKinnon on the ice. And the 24-year-old center is an example to his younger teammates and those around the league.

“He’s just a super committed guy,” Makar said. “He loves hockey, and that’s the way he plays. It shows on the ice. Just the way he handles his routine is very specific and you just learn from star players like that.”

Henrik Lundqvist

“The King” is 37, yet could be the difference between the New York Rangers missing the playoffs for a third consecutive season or contending ahead of schedule. The longtime starting goaltender isn’t fazed by young backup Alexandar Georgiev and top prospect Igor Shesterkin looming in the not-too-distant future.

“My approach will not change,” Lundqvist said. “I need to reach my top level no matter what, no matter who’s next to me or where the team is at.”

Lundqvist said the start of last season was the best he had felt in a while. He posted a 2.68 goals-against average and .919 save percentage in his first 22 starts last season, which would be great for an improved Rangers team with a better blue line and more firepower up front.

“That’s the level I just need to reach and sustain throughout the year, and then I know I can make a difference,” Lundqvist said.

Alex Ovechkin

The release of “Ovi O’s” cereal marked his 34th birthday. If anyone has shown age is just a number, it’s Ovechkin, who is now the Washington Capitals’ oldest player and still could score 50 goals. Even though Ovechkin said he’s “not a grandpa” and trained differently this summer, don’t expect him to alter his style too much.

“I’m still young, you know,” Ovechkin said. “I still want to play my game. … We’re here for 25 minutes or whatever it is — I just want to be here to win, whatever it takes.”

Ovechkin preceded O’Reilly as playoff MVP when he led the Capitals to the first title in franchise history in 2018. After a full summer off, he is refreshed to try to do it again.

“He’s obviously a different talent,” Washington winger Carl Hagelin said. “A guy like that doesn’t come around very often. He’s one of those energetic guys even though he’s 33, 34 years old. He comes to the rink with a smile every day. He does what he has to do.”

Mark Stone

There may not be a more complete winger in the NHL than Stone, who put up 12 points in the Vegas Golden Knights’ seven-game first-round series against San Jose. Stone is free of Ottawa’s long-term rebuild and starting a $76 million, eight-year contract with big expectations to help Vegas make another long playoff run.

“You get a No. 1 forward,” Golden Knights forward Jonathan Marchessault said. “He’s an unbelievable player. He does everything well on the ice. He puts up great numbers every year, and he’s a successful player.”

Vegas is one of several NHL teams without a captain. That might not last long with Stone in the fold.

“He’s not a guy that’s trying to be a leader,” Marchessault said. “He’s just a born leader, so it’s just natural for him.”

Rasmus Dahlin

The 2018 No. 1 pick had 44 points to lead all rookie defenseman. It was just the floor for where Dahlin wants to start.

“Of course I want to score more goals, have more assists and stuff like that,” Dahlin said. “Last season, I had more points than I expected, but this year, I always want more. That’s why I play.”

The Buffalo Sabres are counting on that in their first season under coach Ralph Krueger. Captain Jack Eichel has big expectations for Dahlin, who he believes “lived up to all the hype.”

“You look at how good he was last year in year one and how much more he knows now,” Eichel said. “I think he’s primed to have a monster season.”

Previewing the 2019-20 Buffalo Sabres

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(The 2019-20 NHL season is almost here so it’s time to look at all 31 teams. We’ll be breaking down strengths and weaknesses, whether teams are better or worse this season and more!)

For more 2019-20 PHT season previews, click here.

Better or Worse: Significantly better. Colin Miller is an underrated defenseman who might be able to take on a bigger role than he played in Vegas. Henri Jokiharju provides another (eventual?) boost on the right side, possibly opening up room to trade Rasmus Ristolainen.

The forward group gets a boost from Marcus Johansson, and Jimmy Vesey if Vesey can take a step forward. Maybe most importantly, they didn’t lose Jeff Skinner.

Strengths: The high end of this team is powerful, and could get better, being that Jack Eichel is just 22, and Rasmus Dahlin is only 19. There’s also a little more help beyond the top guys than in 2018-19, where little good happened when Eichel, Dahlin, and Skinner were off the ice.

Weaknesses: Buffalo took some significant steps in improving the talent around their top players, but this is still not a very deep team. The Sabres badly need Casey Mittelstadt to make a dramatic leap as a sophomore. Even then, the bottom two forward lines seem pretty shaky, and their defense faces similar depth challenges. The Sabres also didn’t really address their goaltending situation, so they’ll have to cross their fingers that Carter Hutton and Linus Ullmark (or someone else, eventually?) will work out better than they did in 2018-19.

[MORE: Under pressure | X-factor | Three questions]

Coach Hot Seat Rating (1-10, 10 being red hot): From 1997-2013, Lindy Ruff served as Sabres head coach. During the offseason, Ralph Krueger became the fourth Sabres coach since Ruff was fired in Feb. 2013. The Sabres have missed the playoffs for eight consecutive seasons (plus 10 of the last 12), and haven’t won a playoff series since 2006-07.

Ideally, Krueger’s seat would be ice cold, but patience is beyond thin in hockey-loving Buffalo. If the Sabres suffer more from the same under a coach who’s spent the last few years more interested in the 4-4-2 in soccer than the 1-3-1 in hockey, then the heat could start boiling pretty quickly.

But there does tend to be a grace period when a new coach takes over, so let’s call it a five or a six.

Three Most Fascinating Players: Jeff Skinner, Rasmus Dahlin, and Casey Mittelstadt.

Skinner got his money, stunningly so, to the tune of $9 million per season. Now he’ll face pressure to justify that price, and he’ll be following up a season where he played a little bit over his head, as his 40 goals came via a 14.9 shooting percentage, the highest of his nine-year career. If he’s closer to his 2017-18 numbers (24 goals, 8.7 shooting percentage), there will be grumbling.

Dahlin was absolutely dazzling as a rookie, to the point that I was arguing that the Sabres should have echoed the Dallas Stars’ handling of Miro Heiskanen by giving Dahlin even more ice time, just to see if he could handle it. Maybe the Sabres will drop any facade of the “training wheels” being on in 2019-20? I’d guess Dahlin can thrive even in tough, big minutes — particularly compared to the Buffalo’s less-than-ideal other options.

Again, Mittelstadt needs to be better in his second full season. He came into the NHL with Calder Trophy hype not that different from Dahlin, and 2018-19 readjusted expectations … but a leap in 2019-20 could be crucial for Buffalo’s chances to compete.

Playoffs or Lottery: The Sabres did a lot right, and if Krueger ends up being a big upgrade from Phil Housley as head coach, then Buffalo could leap even further.

Unfortunately, the Sabres are also in arguably the toughest division in the NHL. It’s difficult to imagine Buffalo being in range of last year’s top three Atlantic teams (Tampa Bay, Boston, and Toronto), and the Panthers spent a ton to improve on what was already an impressive core. There might not be a lot of seats left in this game of musical chairs, and my guess is that the Sabres will find themselves stumbling out of the mix once again.

It wouldn’t be shocking if Buffalo stayed in the bubble longer than last season, but I’d say they’re more likely to play the lottery than reach the postseason.

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Pominville and other bargain bin NHL free agents to consider

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With training camps nearing, it’s not surprising that you won’t find a ton of great NHL-ready options in free agency as of Sept. 3.

That’s especially true once you start crossing certain names off of the list with the help of context. Jake Gardiner’s either dealing with back issues, or waiting for a team (possibly the Maple Leafs) to sort out cap issues before signing a deal. Justin Williams just announced that he’s taking some time off, at best. Patrick Marleau’s potential options seem cloudy. Joe Thornton appears primed to sign with the Sharks, eventually (maybe).

When you knock those four names off of the list at a place like Cap Friendly, things start to look pretty stark.

Nonetheless, it’s worthwhile to bat around a few names, even if there might only be one or two players who end up being worth anything more than a tryout. Let’s consider some that stand out; feel free to bring up other UFAs who might be worth a mention in the comments.

Jason Pominville: One of the few on this list that I’d consider signing to an actual one-year contract, rather than merely a PTO, if it came down to it. Sportsnet’s Eric Engels reports that the Montreal Canadiens are considering Pominville, but also reports that nothing is “imminent,” so you’d assume another bidder could roll in.

On one hand, yes, Pominville is 36. There’s some risk that his already marginal potential would boil down to zero considering all of his mileage.

Yet, you’ll note that Pominville managed a respectable 31 points despite minimal ice time, and while much of that offense came alongside Jeff Skinner and Jack Eichel, Pominville was one of the best fits with those two. Teams probably won’t ask Pominville to play on a top line very often, but he could be a cheap option to plug into different scenarios.

Pominville comes off reasonably well by a number of metrics, and his RAPM chart from Evolving Hockey looks positive enough:

If it wasn’t already clear, we’re so deep in the discount aisle, we’re actually looking at the stuff that’s in some sad bin outside the store. By those standards, Pominville is reasonably intriguing.

Brian Boyle: At 34, Boyle is no longer the type of center you’d ask to play a “shutdown” role, and he struggled once he was traded to the Predators last season, but this assessment from after that move away from New Jersey still captures Boyle’s value:

If your team’s coach is barking incessantly about adding a big body, you could do worse than Boyle, especially if a team could use someone to screen goalies on the power play. Boyle is a very large human, after all.

Troy Brouwer is another gritty option who could be decent filler.

Thomas Vanek: While Boyle’s largest utility is defense (and being large) at this point, Vanek is all-offense, to the point that he’d likely torment many coaches, particularly since that offense isn’t flowing like it once was.

Still, one could see an argument for Vanek being a power play specialist on a team that lacks a trigger. Is he enough of a net positive to really be worth considering? Debatable.

Tobias Rieder: He was never good enough for an Oilers executive to give him the scapegoat treatment, and it’s undoubtedly been a rough couple of years, but he’s a speedy winger, so there’s at least some appeal there.

Ben Hutton: OK, look … Hutton was abysmal last season. There’s a reason the defense-starved Canucks passed on bringing him back.

Still, Hutton stands out from a pack mostly consisting of way-past-their-prime veterans (Dion Phaneuf, Dan Girardi) in that he’s merely 26 years old. Could Hutton be a serviceable bottom-pairing option after being played well out of his depth with 22:21 ATOI last season? Maybe 2017-18 is a better guide. While Hutton provided marginal offense (six assists in 61 games), his possession numbers were somewhat OK, at least relative to his (bad) teammates, while Hutton averaged a more reasonable 18:25 per night.

There aren’t many signs pointing to Hutton being a “good” defenseman, but could he be an upgrade over a team’s sixth or even seventh option? It’s not out of the question, as the bar is pretty low for bottom pairing defensemen.

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Ideally, your team already has better options than the names mentioned above. Still, there could be some use for players like Pominville, particularly for squads lacking depth.

Now, if your team is looking for a goalie? Well, you could always cross your fingers …

MORE:
• ProHockeyTalk’s 2019 NHL free agency tracker
• Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Your 2019-20 NHL on NBC TV schedule

NBC Sports
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NBC Sports will air 109 games during the 2019-20 NHL regular season with coverage beginning on Opening Night, Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 8 p.m. ET when the St. Louis Blues raise their Stanley Cup banner before facing the Washington Capitals. Following the game will be a playoff rematch as the Vegas Golden Knights host the San Jose Sharks at 10:30 p.m. ET.

The 2019-20 NBC Sports NHL schedule will once again feature “Wednesday Night Hockey” on NBCSN with 14 of the 25 nights showcasing doubleheaders with stars like Alex Ovechkin, Sidney Crosby, Patrick Kane, Steven Stamkos, Connor McDavid, Johnny Gaudreau, Nathan MacKinnon, Henrik Lundqvist, and Patrice Bergeron.

Nearly 75% of NHL teams will play on “Wednesday Night Hockey,” with multiple appearances from the Blues, Golden Knights, Tampa Bay Lightning, Colorado Avalanche, Boston Bruins, and Dallas Stars.

Some notable games on “Wednesday Night Hockey”:

  • October 16 – Sidney Crosby and the Penguins host Nathan MacKinnon and the Avalanche, followed by a clash in Edmonton between Connor McDavid and the Oilers and Claude Giroux and the Flyers.
  • December 4 – Ryan O’Reilly and the defending Stanley Cup Champion Blues face off against the Penguins.
  • January 29 – Offseason acquisition Matt Duchene and the Nashville Predators visit Ovechkin and the Capitals, followed by a battle out west between the Lightning and the Kings in Los Angeles.
  • February 19Artemi Panarin and the Rangers to face Patrick Kane and the Blackhawks in an Original Six clash.
  • February 26Jack Eichel and the Buffalo Sabres will visit the Avalanche, followed by Penguins-Kings.

66 of 109 scheduled regular-season games on NBC and NBCSN – more than 60% – will feature at least one Western Conference team.

WINTER CLASSIC: NBC Sports will present the 2020 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic between the Nashville Predators and the Dallas Stars from Cotton Bowl Stadium in Dallas, Texas, on Jan. 1, 2020, on NBC at 1 p.m. ET.

STADIUM SERIES AND HERITAGE CLASSIC: NBC Sports will present exclusive primetime coverage of the 2020 Coors Light NHL Stadium Series game between the Los Angeles Kings and the Colorado Avalanche from Falcon Stadium at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020, at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

The Calgary Flames and Winnipeg Jets will meet at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Saskatchewan on Oct. 26, 2019 for the 2019 Tim Hortons NHL Heritage Classic at 10 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

STANLEY CUP FINAL REMATCH: The Boston Bruins will play the St. Louis Blues for the first time since Game 7 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final on Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. ET on NBCSN. Coverage of the Flames-Jets Tim Hortons NHL Heritage Classic will follow.

NHL ALL-STAR WEEKEND: NBC will present coverage of the 2020 NHL All-Star Weekend from Enterprise Center in St. Louis, Mo., home of the Blues, on Jan. 24-25, highlighted by live coverage of the All-Star Game on Saturday, Jan. 25, in primetime on NBC.

NHL ON NBCSN: NBC Sports will televise at least 97 NHL regular-season games this season on NBCSN, including the Opening Night doubleheader, 38 “Wednesday Night Hockey” games, and 22 doubleheaders, as well as NHL All-Star coverage from St. Louis. In addition, NBC Sports has left the majority of the final week of the regular season on NBCSN open to allow for the biggest games with playoff implications to be added to the schedule.

Some NBCSN games of note:

  • Thur., Oct. 17 – The top two picks in the 2019 NHL Draft clash on NBCSN, when No. 1 pick Jack Hughes and the N.J. Devils host Kaapo Kakko and the N.Y. Rangers.
  • Sat., Oct. 26 – A rematch of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final featuring the Blues and Bruins in Boston, followed by the 2019 Heritage Classic between the Flames and Jets at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Sask.
  • Fri., Nov. 8 – Live coverage at 2 p.m. ET from Stockholm, Sweden, of the NHL Global Series matchup between the Lightning and Sabres.
  • Tue., Dec. 17 – The first of four matchups featuring Auston Matthews and Toronto Maple Leafs as they host the Sabres.
  • Mon., Jan. 6 – Connor McDavid and the Oilers face Matthews and the Maple Leafs in Toronto.
  • Thur., Jan. 30P.K. Subban faces his former team when the Predators visit the Devils.
  • Mon., Feb. 10 – The Lightning face the Blue Jackets for the first time following Columbus’ sweep of Tampa Bay in the First Round of the 2019 Playoffs.
  • Tue., Feb. 18 – Auston Matthews and the Maple Leafs visit Sidney Crosby and the Penguins.

NHL Live and NHL Overtime, NBC Sports’ live pre- and post-game show with highlights and analysis of NHL matchups, will air before and after most games on NBCSN. A 60-minute edition of NHL Live will air prior to most games, while NHL Overtime will air immediately following most games.

NHL ON NBC:  NHL on NBC coverage begins on Friday, Nov. 29, at 1 p.m. ET, with the 2019 Discover NHL Thanksgiving Showdown featuring the New York Rangers and the Boston Bruins, marking the first of 12 games scheduled to air on NBC during the regular season. Beginning on Jan. 19, and continuing through the end of the regular season, NBC will present the NHL Game of the Week, generally occurring on Sunday afternoons.

NBC Sports Group 2019-20 NHL regular-season schedule (subject to change):

Wed., Oct 2 Washington St. Louis NBCSN 8 p.m.
San Jose Vegas NBCSN 10:30 p.m.
Thur., Oct. 3 Minnesota Nashville NBCSN 8 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 8 San Jose Nashville NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 9 New Jersey Philadelphia NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles Vancouver NBCSN 10 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 15 Tampa Bay Montreal NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 16 Colorado Pittsburgh NBCSN 7 p.m.
Philadelphia Edmonton NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Thur., Oct. 17 N.Y. Rangers New Jersey NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 23 Pittsburgh Tampa Bay NBCSN 8 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 26 St. Louis Boston NBCSN 7 p.m.
Calgary Winnipeg NBCSN 10 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 29 Tampa Bay N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 30 Minnesota St. Louis NBCSN 8 p.m.
Tues., Nov. 5 Boston Montreal NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Chicago San Jose NBCSN 10 p.m.
Wed., Nov. 6 Detroit N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 8 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 8 Tampa Bay Buffalo NBCSN 2 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 11 Arizona Washington NBCSN 7 p.m.
Tues., Nov. 12 Pittsburgh N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., Nov. 13 Washington Philadelphia NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Chicago Vegas NBCSN 10 p.m.
Tues., Nov. 19 Tampa Bay St. Louis NBCSN 8 p.m.
Edmonton San Jose NBCSN 10:30 p.m.
Wed., Nov. 20 Washington N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 8 p.m.
Tues., Nov. 26 Dallas Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Nov. 27 Philadelphia Columbus NBCSN 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 29 N.Y. Rangers Boston NBC 1 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 3 Tampa Bay Nashville NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 4 St. Louis Pittsburgh NBCSN 8 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 10 St. Louis Buffalo NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 11 Boston Washington NBCSN 7 p.m.
Philadelphia Colorado NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 17 Buffalo Toronto NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 18 Colorado Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 23 N.Y. Rangers Philadelphia NBCSN 7 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 27 Minnesota Colorado NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 1 Nashville Dallas NBC 1 p.m.
Thur., Jan. 2 New Jersey N.Y. Islanders NBCSN 7 p.m.
St. Louis Colorado NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Sun., Jan. 5 Detroit Chicago NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Nashville Anaheim NBCSN 10 p.m.
Mon., Jan. 6 Edmonton Toronto NBCSN 7 p.m.
Tues., Jan. 7 Colorado N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 8 Washington Philadelphia NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Dallas Los Angeles NBCSN 10 p.m.
Thur., Jan. 9 Nashville Chicago NBCSN 8:30 p.m.
Tues., Jan. 14 Minnesota Pittsburgh NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 15 Philadelphia St. Louis NBCSN 8 p.m.
Thur., Jan. 16 Tampa Bay Minnesota NBCSN 8 p.m.
Sun., Jan. 19 Boston Pittsburgh NBC 12:30 p.m.
Tues., Jan. 21 Pittsburgh Philadelphia NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 22 Detroit Minnesota NBCSN 8 p.m.
Fri., Jan. 24 Skills Competition – All-Star Weekend NBCSN 8 p.m.
Sat., Jan. 25 NHL All-Star Game NBC 8 p.m.
Mon., Jan. 27 Tampa Bay Dallas NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 29 Nashville Washington NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay Los Angeles NBCSN 10 p.m.
Thur., Jan. 30 Nashville New Jersey NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Sun., Feb. 2 Pittsburgh Washington NBC 12:30 p.m.
Mon., Feb. 3 Philadelphia Detroit NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Tues., Feb. 4 Chicago Minnesota NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Feb. 5 Boston Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Thur., Feb. 6 Detroit Buffalo NBCSN 7 p.m.
San Jose Edmonton NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Sun., Feb. 9 Boston Detroit NBC 12:30 p.m.
Colorado Minnesota NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Mon., Feb. 10 Tampa Bay Columbus NBCSN 7 p.m.
Tues., Feb. 11 Philadelphia N.Y. Islanders NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Feb. 12 Montreal Boston NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Calgary Los Angeles NBCSN 10 p.m.
Thur., Feb. 13 Philadelphia Florida NBCSN 7 p.m.
Sat., Feb. 15 Los Angeles Colorado NBC 8 p.m.
Sun., Feb. 16 Detroit Pittsburgh NBC 12:30 p.m.
Boston N.Y. Rangers NBC 3:30 p.m.
St. Louis Nashville NBCSN 6 p.m.
Tues., Feb. 18 Toronto Pittsburgh NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., Feb. 19 N.Y. Rangers Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Sun., Feb. 23 Pittsburgh Washington NBC 12 p.m.
St. Louis Minnesota NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Vegas Anaheim NBCSN 10 p.m.
Tues., Feb. 25 Chicago St. Louis NBCSN 8 p.m.
Wed., Feb. 26 Buffalo Colorado NBCSN 8 p.m.
Pittsburgh Los Angeles NBCSN 10:30 p.m.
Thur., Feb. 27 Dallas Boston NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Sun., March 1 Philadelphia N.Y. Rangers NBC 12 p.m.
Washington Minnesota NBCSN 8 p.m.
Los Angeles Vegas NBCSN 10:30 p.m.
Tues., March 3 Boston Tampa Bay NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Wed., March 4 Philadelphia Washington NBCSN 7 p.m.
Anaheim Colorado NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Thur., March 5 Carolina Philadelphia NBCSN 7 p.m.
Sun., March 8 St. Louis Chicago NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Colorado San Jose NBCSN 10 p.m.
Tues., March 10 Boston Philadelphia NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., March 11 San Jose Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Sun., March 15 Nashville Minnesota NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Tues., March 17 St. Louis Philadelphia NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., March 18 Pittsburgh N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Vegas Arizona NBCSN 10 p.m.
Sun., March 22 Washington Pittsburgh NBC 12 p.m.
Nashville Chicago NBCSN 7 p.m.
Tues., March 24 St. Louis Washington NBCSN 7 p.m.
Wed., March 25 Pittsburgh Chicago NBCSN 8 p.m.
Arizona Vegas NBCSN 10:30 p.m.
Thur., March 26 Philadelphia Detroit NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Sun., March 29 Pittsburgh Philadelphia NBC 12 p.m.
Minnesota St. Louis NBCSN 7 p.m.
Nashville Colorado NBCSN 9:30 p.m.
Wed., April 1 Philadelphia N.Y. Rangers NBCSN 7:30 p.m.
Dallas Anaheim NBCSN 10 p.m.

STREAMING COVERAGE ON NBCSPORTS.COM AND THE NBC SPORTS APP

NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app — NBC Sports Group’s live streaming platforms for desktops, mobile devices, tablets, and connected TVs — will provide live streaming coverage of the Stanley Cup Playoffs via “TV Everywhere,” giving consumers additional value for their subscription service, and making high quality content available to MVPD customers both in and out of the home and on multiple platforms.

NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app are powered by Playmaker Media and available on the iTunes App Store, Google Play, Windows Store, Roku Channel Store, Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Samsung Smart TVs, Xbox, and Chromecast.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.