Connor Carrick

PHT Morning Skate: McDavid on Return to Play; Parise on Canucks

Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• The NHL released a statement in regards to the protests around the U.S. following the death of George Floyd last week in Minnesota: “In our own sport, we will continue to do better and work diligently toward culture change throughout hockey and endeavour to be mindful of our own shortcomings in this process.”  [NHL.com]

Blake Wheeler, Evander Kane, P.K. Subban and Connor Carrick were among the NHL to give their thoughts. [RMNB]

Connor McDavid on the 24-team Return to Play format: “We were trying to get the format in place first and we’ve got that, so now I think those (other) are questions that start to need answers. The safety of our players and of everyone involved is paramount and that’s the main issue that’s got to get solved right now. I think that’s what needs to be answered before anything happens and we move forward.” [Sporting News]

• “While last week was an important step toward returning to the ice for the NHL/NHLPA-approved 24-team playoff format, it was still only a small one when it comes to actually getting there.” [Winnipeg Sun]

• On the status of Kirill Kaprizov, Alexander Romanov and others: “So we can tell you the union stridently opposes the NHL’s stance that teams should not be permitted to sign players from their respective reserve lists to 2019-20 contracts so they can participate in the tournament. It is the union’s position, and a quite reasonable one, that the matter should revert to the status quo if the sides do not agree to changing the CBA regulation that is in force.” [NY Post]

Zach Parise talks the Wild’s season, Dean Evason and the Canucks. [TSN]

• Steve Yzerman has given the Red Wings’ youngsters the job of keeping the rebuild intact. [NHL.com]

• Angela Ruggiero, one of the coaches of the 3ICE league, speaks out on the lack of women behind benches and in the executive suites of NHL teams. [ESPN]

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Isolating away from family a ‘hot topic’ as NHL plots return

1 Comment

Young and single, Thatcher Demko has plenty of time on his hands, with little to do. Quarantining to play hockey wouldn’t be a problem for the Vancouver Canucks goalie.

“I don’t have too many roots,” the 24-year-old said. “I’ve been living pretty much out of my car for the most part for the last six, seven years just going from place to place.”

Older players disagree.

Minnesota goalie Devan Dubnyk doesn’t think players with children would be interested in spending lengthy stretches away from their loved ones amid the pandemic. And neither does Boston’s Tuukka Rask, who bluntly said: “It doesn’t feel right to take guys away from their families for many, many months at a time.”

It’s a reality players might have to face for the NHL to resume play, something Toronto’s Kyle Clifford calls a “hot topic” among players. While the NHL and its players’ union are discussing a 24-team playoff format to resume the season, figuring out how to incorporate family time in a potential quarantine environment is one of many hurdles to clear.

“For sure that’s a big thing,” said Philadelphia forward James van Riemsdyk, one of the players on the Return to Play committee and a new father. “No one wants to be away from their family for months on end, and everyone is aware of that with who’s on this committee.”

From Dubnyk and Rask in the NHL to Major League Baseball players Mike Trout and Ryan Zimmerman, pro athletes have voiced concerns about spending significant time away from family. When baseball was considering a containment bubble in Arizona to play, Zimmerman — whose wife is due to give birth to the couple’s third child in June — said he wouldn’t accept not seeing them for four or five months.

“I can tell you right now that’s not going to happen,” Zimmerman said. “Not many people have to go through that, nor should they.”

The NHL, like the NBA, does not face the challenge of trying to complete an entire season. But even an abbreviated return calls for coordinating 600-plus players at different stages of their personal lives.

“I think it’d be easier for guys without families or single guys to kind of go on quarantine and enjoy that process as much as you can,” Nashville defenseman Ryan Ellis said. “But it would be tough being a father myself. It would be tough to live through FaceTime in that situation. But you have to weigh the pros and cons on each side and what’s important for you and your family.”

The league was exploring various locations that could host games, including Edmonton, Columbus and Las Vegas. They could be big enough for players to bring family members with them, or the format might allow for a break in the schedule for teams that advance deep into the playoffs.

“You’ve got to kind of create this bubble, but if families are coming in and out, then I don’t know,” said Carolina’s Jordan Martinook, who has a year-old son he doesn’t want to be away from for more than a month at a time. “That kind of compromises the bubble. I don’t know if they would say your family’s got to be with you from day one the whole time or they can’t come if you’re in the bubble.”

NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said league officials are “sensitive to the issue and are focused on finding a solution that works for the players.”

New Jersey’s Connor Carrick, whose Devils might be off until the start of next season, said he trusts NHLPA executive director Don Fehr and his staff to make a decision in the best interest of as many players as possible. Those waiting on the possibility of playing, like Washington’s Beck Malenstyn, hope there’s a resolution that weighs isolation from family members against the risk of them getting infected.

“I think there’s probably a happy medium between the two,” Malenstyn said. “You definitely don’t just want to close the door on your family in a time like this. But it’s also you have to look at it if we were going to take that step to go back and play, it’s the safety of your family to probably not have them around, either, just with the exposure to everything.”

Added Demko, the Vancouver goalie: “I think everyone’s going to have to make a sacrifice: players, owners, union. I don’t think that there is a scenario where everyone’s going to be happy with the situation.”

Devils’ Carrick uses NHL pause to enter the podcasting world

Getty Images

Connor Carrick hadn’t even released the first episode of his podcast and he already was feeling sick. In fact, all he did was announce it on his social media platforms before the nerves and anxiety were turning his stomach.

He wasn’t about to play in a big game. All Carrick was doing was release a podcast. Despite playing nearly 300 professional games between the AHL and NHL, the 26-year-old Devils defenseman experienced those familiar feelings we all do.

But Carrick’s thirst for knowledge allowed him to push through that anxiety and publish his first episode, a question and answer session with fans. 

Two episodes in and Carrick is meeting his goal of not only entertaining and informing fans during the NHL pause, but also continuing his own journey of learning.

“As a pro athlete I’m kind of responsible for my own self-education. I don’t have a curriculum,” Carrick told NBC Sports. “I’m not in school full-time, but I found that my life and the way that I look at the world has expanded since being out of school and being responsible for what books I read and what information I want to put in my head. It really can shape my world for better or worse based on what information I’m digesting.”

How it all began

The genesis of Carrick’s podcast came last summer when he released a “day in the life” video detailing his off-season regimen. His wife, Lexi, had been urging him to check out certain podcasts, and when he entered that world he was hooked. That’s when starting his own revolving around good conversations with people he found interesting began to take shape.

“It’s a cool area to try and connect with other people and try and give back to the podcasting world what I’ve taken from it,” said Carrick, who works with Colin Steingard to produce each episode.

The podcast won’t be just about hockey. Carrick may have already published episodes with Sportsnet NHL insider Elliotte Friedman and Hockey Hall of Famer Jayna Hefford, but he wants the conversations to be a blend of hockey and life.

“I definitely want to talk about life skills,” he said. “I think in terms in how to have a better lifestyle where I can be more productive and enjoy the process more where there’s less pull. It’s something that I think you train for forever, but I don’t discount the fact that my passion is hockey, my career is hockey, a lot of people in my audience will come from the world of hockey. I do think I’ve always had an ability to understand the game and the breakdown well, and I think the conversation will naturally lean that way. A lot of my friends, people I look up to I’m curious what their best practices are, and those will be conversations to be had.”

Coming out of the shell

The NHL pause afforded Carrick the opportunity to start the podcast as it would have been difficult to get going in-season. This downtime has allowed him to get comfortable being the one asking the questions, not answering them as he’s used to doing.

Hockey players, for the most part, are reserved. It’s only over the last few years the younger generation has brought more personality into the game. Still, many aren’t comfortable showing fans who they are. 

Carrick said that fear of judgement from those in the game prevents many players from showing their true selves.

“Culturally, it’s such a team-oriented sport and that’s beautiful about it, and guys revere and respect that and it’s what the players before us always did,” he said. “It’s not an ‘I’ game, it’s a ‘we’ game. And I think so much of that has to do with the humility of the sport. The best of the best get hit. I think the accessibility, the information out there in terms of other passions of life, it’s just available now. You can learn anything about anything at any given time, whether it’s through social media, YouTube, whatever. 

“The generation that’s coming into the NHL now is a generation that grew up with those tools and really recognizes how to use them. I still didn’t even have Facebook until I was a junior or senior in high school. I’ve always been technologically averse. I’ve always preferred human-to-human, face-to-face [interactions].”

Criticisms have been lobbed at players who are heavy social media users, with the opinion that if you’re constantly Tweeting or on Instagram then you’re not focused on the sport.

“I think as players there’s an element of guilt,” Carrick added. “You want to be all-in and you want to be totally focused on your craft as an athlete and to dip your toe into anything else will come across as if you’ve got a Plan B or you’re not totally in it.”

The guests Carrick is targeting are individuals who can provide listeners with a takeaway from the conversation. And the listener won’t be the only one getting something out of the experience.

“I want to leave them through the power of story and idea and talking about the development of every guest that I speak with,” he said. “I want them to leave with I’m passionate and curious about their own life in terms of where do they want to grow next and I want them to feel more equipped to do so. A lot of the people I’ll be speaking to will be exceptional individuals. I don’t think the world needs another eight-minute abs or morning hack to be their best self. What they need is a story in the back of their mind that can continue to fuel their efforts, their dreams. I know that’s how I’ve always operated — I’ve always been very role-model-oriented. 

“I’m excited. I’m excited to talk and tell stories and exchange ideas and hopefully try and discover who people are that I have on the podcast and get to the bottom of what makes them so great.”

MORE HOCKEY PLAYER SIDE PASSIONS:
Maple Leafs’ Hyman taking best shot as esports franchise owner
Donovan’s fundraising efforts aid Oklahoma youth hockey
YouTube channel allows Sharks’ Ferraro to show different side

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

NHL season marked by coaching carousel, changes

Firing coaches during the season has been relatively common in the NHL for decades. The volume is nonetheless jaw-dropping in 2019-20 – and there is still half a season to go.

Seven coaches have been either fired or forced out. Gerard Gallant of the Golden Knights became the latest casualty Wednesday when he was fired less than two years after leading Vegas to the Stanley Cup Final and being named the NHL coach of the year.

Peter DeBeor, who was dismissed earlier this season by San Jose, was hired to replace him.

Five of the firings were related to team performance. Bill Peters resigned in Calgary after it was disclosed he directed racist slurs at a Nigerian-born player in the minors a decade ago and kicked and punched players behind the bench in Carolina. Jim Montgomery was fired in Dallas for unprofessional conduct and has since said he is undergoing alcohol rehabilitation.

While underachieving teams and poor records are the leading factors for the changes, owner impatience isn’t far behind. Brian Burke, a veteran former executive for several NHL teams and a current Sportsnet analyst, thinks most are far too impatient these days.

“It is a lot easier to turn around a business in some other area than it is in hockey and pro sports, and the Berube factor does not help,” Burke said.

Indeed, Craig Berube’s remarkable coaching job a year ago raised the expectation for fast results. He took over the St. Louis Blues in November 2018 and led them from dead last in the standings in January to their first Stanley Cup title.

Mike Sullivan led the Pittsburgh Penguins to consecutive Cup titles after taking over in December 2015. A few years before that, Darryl Sutter took over the Los Angeles Kings in December 2011 and led them to their first Cup that season. There was another parade in 2014 season.

Instant success in all cases. Like Gallant, who took an expansion team all the way to the Cup Final in its first year of existence.

It has all put more hockey coaches on notice in a field that already had very little security.

Of the 31 NHL current coaches, only three have been with the same team since the start of the 2015-16 season. Jon Cooper of the Tampa Bay Lightning has the longest tenure (March 2013). Paul Maurice was hired by Winnipeg the following January and Jeff Blashill joined the Detroit Red Wings in June 2015.

Including the seven firings this season (Gallant, DeBoer, Montgomery, Peters, Mike Babcock in Toronto, John Hynes in New Jersey and Peter Laviolette in Nashville), there are 14 coaches in their first season with their team this year. Berube, title in hand, has been on the job less than 14 months.

Many owners are tired of waiting for success, said Pierre McGuire, an NBC Sports NHL analyst.

“I think people look at history in the league and ownership in particular, and say: ‘What about us?’” McGuire said. “’You’ve told us about this five-year plan or four-year plan, and these guys are doing it in one year, and in some instances six months.’ That’s what leads to itchy trigger fingers.”

Change does bring some positives.

Through Tuesday, the Maple Leafs are 16-6-2 under Sheldon Keefe. The Flames are 13-6-1 under Geoff Ward. The Stars are 10-4-1 with Rick Bowness, and the Devils, Sharks and Predators are showing signs of improvement under Alain Nasreddine, Bob Boughner and Hynes, who only needed a month to find a job.

Still, only three are currently in playoff spots.

“I think (Hynes) got a rough shake with our start,” Devils defense Connor Carrick said. “Bad starts are hard enough to deal with in the NHL. I think bad starts with expectations are worse, and that’s what we were dealing with.”

In 1987, there were 21 NHL teams and 16 made the postseason. When Seattle begins play in 2021-22, there will be 32 teams – and still just 16 will make the playoffs. A postseason berth will be even more precious and frustration levels will likely grow.

“The industry has never been patient enough with coaches and it’s at an all-time low right now,” Burke said. “Casualty rates are at an all-time high, and we’re not done yet this year.”

Berube aside, history shows midseason changes rarely end with a championship.

Major League Baseball has had just two managers take over a team during the course of a season and win a World Series. Bob Lemon did it with the New York Yankees in 1978. Jack McKeon matched that in 2003 with the Florida Marlins.

The NBA has seen a midseason coaching change result in three titles. Paul Westhead replaced an injured Jack McKinney (bicycle accident) in 1980 and took the Lakers to a title. Pat Riley replaced Westhead in ‘81-82 and got LA another crown. Tyronn Lue replaced David Blatt in Cleveland in 2015-16 and led the Cavs to the championship.

Since 2000, no NFL interim coach has taken over a team in midseason and led it to the playoffs.

New York Islanders coach Barry Trotz was Predators coach for 15 seasons. He worked the entire time with general manager David Poile and the two had a plan they followed. They counted on each other.

“What happens when you’re winning, you’re the smartest guy on the planet,” said Trotz, who won a Cup with Washington in 2018. “When you’re losing, you don’t know a thing. You need people when things aren’t going well. In this business, when it’s not going well, you have the fan base on you, you have the media on you. You need someone that trusts what you’re doing and can say, ‘Hey, I believe in you and I don’t see that there’s a change needed.'”

Devils vs. Flyers livestream: How to watch Wednesday Night Hockey

Getty Images

NBCSN’s coverage of the 2019-20 NHL season continues with the Wednesday Night Hockey matchup between the New Jersey Devils and Philadelphia Flyers. Coverage begins at 6:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN. You can watch the game online and on the NBC Sports app by clicking here.

The Devils opened the 2019-20 campaign dropping their first two games of the season. They blew a 4-0 lead Friday night at home, falling to the Jets 5-4 in a shootout, and were dominated the following night in Buffalo, losing 7-2.

Last season the Devils finished tied for sixth for most goals/against per game (3.30), while starting three different goalies throughout the year. Through two games this season, the same problem remains as New Jersey has allowed 5.50 goals/against per game.

“We’re playing like we want to have an easy game,” said Devils head coach John Hynes. “We can talk about it nine different ways but that’s the reality of where we’re at right now.”

The Flyers dealt Wayne Simmonds to the Predators in exchange for Ryan Hartman and a 2020 4th round pick at the 2019 trade deadline. Now a member of the Devils, Simmonds makes his return to Philly and will play against his former team for the first time after spending the past seven-plus seasons with the franchise.

“In a perfect world maybe it could have worked, but for what my goal is and where I’m trying to get to, I think it was a bad fit to be quite honest,” said Simmonds. “With all the pieces they have there in place, there’s a reason why I did get traded. Obviously, I wasn’t a piece they needed anymore.”

Philly will be tacking on thousands of sky miles to start the season. The Flyers played a preseason game overseas in Switzerland against Lausanne HC of the Swiss Elite League, before traveling to Prague, Czech Republic, to open the regular season against the Blackhawks. They host the Devils Wednesday night in Philly before making their Western Canada road trip.

[WATCH LIVE – COVERAGE BEGINS AT 6:30 P.M. ET – NBCSN]

WHAT: New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers
WHERE: Wells Fargo Center
WHEN: Wednesday, Oct. 9, 6:30 p.m. ET
TV: NBCSN
LIVE STREAM: You can watch the Devils-Flyers stream on NBC Sports’ live stream page and the NBC Sports app.

PROJECTED LINEUPS

DEVILS
Taylor HallNico HischierNikita Gusev
Jesper BrattTravis ZajacKyle Palmieri
Blake ColemanJack Hughes – Wayne Simmonds
Miles WoodKevin RooneyJohn Hayden

Sami VatanenP.K. Subban
Andy GreeneDamon Severson
Will ButcherConnor Carrick

Starting goalie: Cory Schneider

FLYERS
Claude GirouxKevin HayesJakub Voracek
Oskar LindblomSean CouturierTravis Konecny
James van RiemsdykScott Laughton – Carsen Twarynski
Connor Bunnaman – Michael RafflTyler Pitlick

Ivan ProvorovJustin Braun
Travis SanheimMatt Niskanen
Robert HaggShayne Gostisbehere

Starting goalie: Carter Hart

On Wednesday night’s season debut of Wednesday Night Hockey on NBCSN, NHL fans will be able to get a sneak peek to a yet to be released Green Day song called “Fire, Ready, Aim”. The song will serve as the opening theme song of Wednesday Night Hockey throughout the 2019-20 season and will be featured on NHL on NBC Sports broadcasts throughout the season.

Produced by NBC Sports, the high-energy show open features the band playing their new song on a hockey rink interspersed with action shots of more than a dozen NHL players, including Tuukka Rask of the Boston Bruins, Jonathan Toews of the Chicago Blackhawks, Dylan Larkin of the Detroit Red Wings, P.K. Subban of the New Jersey Devils, Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins, Vladimir Tarasenko of the St. Louis Blues and Alex Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals, among others.