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Seguin becomes Stars’ highest-paid player, gets Super Mario tribute

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The Dallas Stars signed Tyler Seguin to a contract extension on Thursday, which is already fantastic news. The way they did it – and some of the details – make it even better.

Especially greedy (and honestly, probably unrealistic) Stars fans would’ve hoped that Seguin would sign at or below Jamie Benn‘s $9.5 million cap hit. That didn’t happen, yet Seguin isn’t the Stars’ most expensive signing by much. The team announced that it’s an eight-year extension that carries a $9.85M AAV.

“It was a process, a learning process this summer — learning the whole side of business negotiations,” Seguin said. “But at the end of the day, I knew where I wanted to be, I knew where home was and that was here in Dallas.”

Honestly, the best part really might be the way they announced it. The team did an extended riff on NES-era Super Mario, with the key exception being that His Extension Is Not At Another Castle.

Bravo, Stars.

(You may ask: “Bravo for the terms of the deal or the presentation?” The answer, of course, is both.)

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman notes that Seguin’s contract features a full no-movement clause:

Seguin becomes a key part of some significant long-term investments in Dallas:

Seguin, 26 ($9.85M through 2026-27)
Benn, 29: ($9.5M through 2024-25)
Alexander Radulov, 32 ($6.25M through 2021-22)
Ben Bishop, 31 ($4.917M through 2022-23)
John Klingberg, 26 ($4.25M through 2021-22)

The Stars saw Benn’s bargain $5.25M cap hit end after 2016-17, while Seguin will enter 2017-18 on the final year of his own steal of a $5.75M cap hit. With that, the last remaining super-deal is that of Klingberg, who’s essentially an $8-9M defenseman making $4.25M in AAV.

Can the Stars finally deliver on their immense potential now that (almost) everyone’s gotten paid? That’s the burning question, but at least Dallas doesn’t have to worry about a John Tavares situation, or anything like what the Columbus Blue Jackets are dealing with regarding Artemi Panarin and Sergei Bobrovsky.

Want an extra helping of joy, Stars fans? Let’s end with Seguin and puppies:

via Getty

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

PHT Power Rankings: Non-playoff teams most likely to make postseason return

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It is the summer and with no games being played at the moment it is awfully difficult to rank the NHL’s 31 teams on a weekly basis. So the PHT Power Rankings will spend the next month taking a look back at some of the best (and worst) developments in the NHL, both past and present. Best trades. Worst trades. Best all-time teams. Any other random things we feel like ranking. This week we look at which of the NHL’s non-playoff teams from this past season that are most likely to make a return to the playoffs.

There were 15 teams in the NHL that missed the playoffs during the 2017-18 NHL season and you can guarantee that at least one or two from that group will bounce back and make the postseason this year. There were five such teams a year ago with the Colorado Avalanche, New Jersey Devils, Los Angeles Kings, Philadelphia Flyers, and Winnipeg Jets all making a return to the playoffs, with the Jets going all the way to the Western Conference Final.

In this week’s PHT Power Rankings we rank all 15 non-playoff teams from a year ago in order of which one of them is most likely to see a similar turnaround.

1. St. Louis Blues — The Blues were right there in 2017-18, falling just one point short of the second wild card spot in the Western Conference even after trading Paul Stastny at the deadline. They bolstered their lineup this offseason by trading for a great two-way center in Ryan O'Reilly, bringing back David Perron off a career year in Vegas for yet another stint, and signing Tyler Bozak in free agency. That is suddenly a pretty good looking offensive lineup to go with a team that was sixth in the league in goals against last season. Honestly, it would probably be a surprise if this team did not make the playoffs in 2018-19.

2. Florida Panthers –– The Panthers were one of the best teams in the league over the second half of last season, finishing on a 25-8-2 run over their final 35 games, and like the Blues, ended up falling just a single point short of the second wild card spot in their conference. With Aleksander Barkov, Jonathan Huberdeau, Vincent Trocheck, and Aaron Ekblad, they have a really good young core in place, while Evgenii Dadonov proved to be an outstanding pickup last summer. They added another top-six winger to the mix with the trade for Mike Hoffman. Whether that is enough to close the gap on the top-three in the Atlantic Division remains to be seen (all of Tampa Bay, Toronto, and Boston were at least nine points ahead of Florida in the standings last year), but they should be right in the thick of the wild card chase. They’re not going to maintain the pace they played at over the second half of the season, but they’re also probably not as bad as they were in the first half.

3. Carolina Hurricanes — Trading Jeff Skinner is going to hurt the offense, but they have high hopes for 19-year-old Martin Necas and No. 2 overall draft pick Andrei Svechnikov. The real hope for optimism here though is on defense, a unit that looks to be absolutely loaded on paper after the offseason additions of Dougie Hamilton and Calvin de Haan, while still (for now) holding on to Justin Faulk. The Hurricanes were already one of the best shot suppression teams in the league and just need to figure out a way to get respectable goaltending (and let’s be honest, Scott Darling can not possibly struggle more than he did a year ago). Yes, we say this stuff about them every year, but one of these years it finally has to happen.

4. Dallas Stars — Even though the Stars did not make a big splash move during the offseason (they are, however, one of the teams rumored to have had interest in Erik Karlsson) they still made a pretty significant change to the team when they brought in Jim Montgomery to replace Ken Hitchcock behind the bench. The Stars have been one of the league’s most consistently disappointing teams given the high-end talent they have at the top of the roster (currently with Tyler Seguin, Jamie Benn, John Klingberg, and Alexander Radulov) and the blockbuster moves they make every offseason. Yet every year they always seem to just settle in around the playoff bubble as a 90-92 point team. They are always so close, yet seemingly so far.

5. Chicago Blackhawks — The success or failure of the 2018-19 Chicago Blackhawks likely hinges on whether or not starting goalie Corey Crawford is healthy and able to play. When he was in the lineup last season, the Blackhawks were pretty good. When he went out of the lineup with a still mysterious upper-body injury they were of the worst teams in the league. Given the decline of the Blackhawks’ defense and their forward depth they are going to have to rely on goaltending quite a bit to carry them. A healthy Crawford might be able to do that. Their Plan B in net may not be able to.

6. Edmonton Oilers — It is stunning that the team with the most dominant offensive player in the world missed the playoffs by nearly 20 points last season. Also stunning that we are still not sure if they are good enough to be a playoff team this season. While it was the special teams units that mostly sunk the Oilers’ chances in 2017-18, this was still a pretty mediocre 5-on-5 team and they really didn’t make any significant changes to that roster. Given what has happened in previous years when they tried to make significant changes (Taylor Hall for Adam Larsson; signing Milan Lucic; Jordan Eberle for Ryan Strome) maybe that is a good thing. Flawed as this team is, they do still have Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl at the top of the lineup and there is always a chance they could go off and carry the team back to the playoffs.

[Related: 10 NHL people that need to have a better season in 2018-19]

7. Calgary Flames — The 2017-18 season was a giant disappointment for the Flames after there were such high preseason hopes. They were bringing back a really good young core with Johnny Gaudreau, Sean Monahan, and Matthew Tkachuk, and spent a ton of money and assets to bring in Travis Hamonic and Mike Smith to shore up the back end. Even though the three young forwards all played well (and Gaudreau was fantastic) everything else just kind of fell flat. James Neal is a nice addition up front, but trading Hamilton is a big blow to the defense even with Noan Hanifin and Elias Lindholm coming back in return. Smith was okay in his first year as their starting goaltender, but he is entering his age 36 season and just being “okay” may not be good enough.

8. Arizona Coyotes — The Coyotes finished with the worst record in the Western Conference and the third worst record overall, but they finished really strong, beat a lot of really good teams, and have a ton of young talent in place. When healthy, Antti Raanta was as good as any goalie in the NHL last season and if he can come close to duplicating that performance over a full year he could be a game-changer for the Coyotes. Another potential game-changer: Dylan Strome, the third overall pick from 2015. After dominating the OHL and AHL the past couple of years he showed some of that ability at the NHL level down the stretch run of the regular season. He is still a big-time talent. They also have what should be a strong 1-2 punch down the middle with Derek Stepan and Alex Galchenyuk. They are not all the way there yet, but if a few things break their way (Raanta being as good as he showed last year; Strome taking a big step forward) they could be a big surprise team in the Western Conference.

9. Buffalo Sabres — A lot was made over their return for O’Reilly, but other than Tage Thompson, that was very much a quantity over quality deal and is not something that is likely to change for the fortunes of the team anytime soon. If anything, it made them a little worse. Fortunately, that was not the only trade they made over the summer. Conor Sheary will not have Sidney Crosby next to him in Buffalo so he remains sort of a mystery, but they ended up getting Skinner from Carolina for a really good price. In the end, they lost one big-time player, picked up another, and have a bunch of question marks including Carter Hutton, their new starting goalie. Jack Eichel will still be great, though. So, honestly, probably expect more of the same.

10. New York Rangers — The rebuild is well underway and it is very likely that even more veterans will get moved before the trade deadline this season (Mats Zuccarello? Kevin Hayes?). Playing in a division that is absolutely loaded at the top it just seems like the playoffs are a real long shot, even with Henrik Lundqvist in net.

11. Montreal Canadiens — Their best and probably only hope is that Carey Price plays like the 2014-15 version Carey Price. Since that is still always a possibility that probably puts them ahead of a few other teams in the league that do not have Carey Price.

12. Vancouver Canucks — Vancouver spent the offseason acting like a team that is a playoff contender by spending big money on its bottom-six. This is not a playoff contender. Brock Boeser looks great, Bo Horvat is pretty good, they have some intriguing prospects, but it is still not a very good team overall. And something that seems to get overlooked is that Henrik and Daniel Sedin were still pretty solid last season (two of their top-three scorers), and they are not coming back.

13. Detroit Red Wings — They got a gift in the draft when Filip Zadina fell to them at No. 6 overall, but this situation is still very bleak as they are spending a ton of money on a team that is just not very good. They accumulated a lot of draft picks, but this is going to be a long, painful rebuild.

14. New York Islanders — They lost their best player (John Tavares) in free agency to the Toronto Maple Leafs and spent the entire offseason replacing him with fourth-liners to go with all of the other fourth-liners they already had. Mathew Barzal is a worthy franchise cornerstone, but he will not be able to do it all by himself.

15. Ottawa Senators — There is absolutely nothing to be excited about here This was one of the worst teams in the league a year ago, has already lost one of its top scorers this offseason, and it only seems to be a matter of when, and not if, Erik Karlsson gets traded. Matt Duchene and Mark Stone are also entering the final year of their contracts so they, too, could be on the move at some point. This looks like a lottery team.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Canadiens have wasted Max Pacioretty

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Barring an unforeseen change in the coming weeks, it seems obvious that Max Pacioretty‘s time with the Montreal Canadiens is coming to an end. The organization has seemed hell-bent on trading him for months, his agent says there has been no contract offer as he enters the final year of his current deal, and earlier this week it was reported that he will not be negotiating a new contract once the 2018-19 season begins in an effort to avoid any additional distractions. The only reasonable conclusion that a reasonable person should reach given all of those circumstances is that Pacioretty’s remaining time with the team should be measured in months or weeks (if not days) as the team seems ready to embark on what could be another non-playoff season (this would be the third in four years).

Whenever and however his time with the Canadiens comes to an end, it will be a sad end to a sad story that has seen one of the NHL’s most prominent teams — even if in name only, and not actual results — waste and squander what should have been a franchise-changing gift from the gods.

Pacioretty isn’t a superstar on the level of a Crosby, Ovechkin, or McDavid; he’s not that kind of generational talent. But what he has been over the past seven years is one of the league’s top goal-scorers and a true front-line winger that has been playing on a laughably below market value contract. This is the type of gift that a smart team should have been able to exploit and capitalize on when it comes to building a contender. One of the most valuable commodities in a salary capped NHL is a young, front-line player on an entry-level contract because they are giving their team the most bang for the buck. You’re getting top-level production for a fraction of its true market cost which, in theory, should allow that team to load up elsewhere on the roster.

[UPDATE: Canadiens deal Pacioretty to Vegas]

Pacioretty hasn’t played on an entry-level deal since the 2010-11 season, but ever since then he has still given the Canadiens all-star level production at what has mostly been second-or third-line price in recent years.

At the conclusion of the 2010-11 season, Pacioretty, still relatively unproven, inked a two-year bridge deal that paid him $1.625 million per season. In the first year of that contract he offensive breakout with 33 goals, prompting them to sign him to a six-year, $27 million contract.

It has proven to be a disastrous deal for Pacioretty financially because he has outperformed it from the minute he put pen to paper. Meanwhile, it has been a financial godsend for the Canadiens when it comes to the production they have received for the price they are paying.

Pacioretty’s 206 goals since the start of the 2011-12 season are the ninth most in the NHL during that stretch (even with his down year this past season that saw him score just 17 goals in 64 games), and it is almost comical to look at how little he has been paid compared to the other top goal-scorers in the league during that stretch.

Here, we see the top-10 goal scorers over that stretch and how much they have made to this point.

Shortly after Pacioretty’s agent, Allen Walsh, took to Twitter a little more than a week ago to proclaim his client’s love of Montreal and desire to remain with the team, one of his former Montreal teammates, Lars Eller, also Tweeted his support for Pacioretty with a pretty accurate assessment of the situation.

Wrote Eller in two separate Tweets: “As a friend, I hope Max Pacioretty’s situation is resolved soon. He has shouldered one of the toughest jobs in hockey wearing the C for the CH, taking responsibility and blame for things beyond his control. At the same time being one of the top goal scorers in the game. He is as committed and cares as much as anyone I’ve ever played with. Any team would be lucky to have him.”

There is a lot of truth here, especially as it relates to the job of being the Canadiens’ captain and shouldering blame when things go wrong. If Pacioretty goes seven or eight games without scoring a goal it’s like the whole place goes insane and everything that is going wrong is his fault. But it is truly remarkable how much responsibility Pacioretty has had to take when it comes to carrying the Canadiens’ offense, and how much of it has run through him.

Here is an organization that has had — and this fact can not be stated enough times — one of the best goal scorers in the NHL playing for a fraction of what his peers at the top of the league are making, while also typically spending fairly close to the salary cap. This should have been a massive advantage when it comes to building a team around him. Despite that, the Canadiens never found a true No. 1 center to play alongside him. Outside of one year of Alexander Radulov, they never really managed to bring in another top-line offensive talent that could be a suitable running mate at the top of the lineup. They also developed a habit of trading skill for grit and toughness by shipping out the likes of P.K. Subban, Lars Eller, and most recently, Alex Galcheyuk.

The result has been a team that, independent of Pacioretty, has consistently been a dull, boring and — at best — mediocre offensive hockey team.

[Related: Expect huge year from Pacioretty no matter where he plays]

Take another look at that list of players up above. Eight of them (Ovechkin, Stamkos, Tavares, Seguin, Malkin, Benn, Kane, and Marchand) have played on teams that have been among the 10 highest scoring teams in the league since the start of the 2011-12 season, including all of the top-six.

Pavelski’s Sharks are 12th during that stretch.

Where do the Canadiens reside? In the bottom-10 at 21st.

It’s almost organizational malpractice to have an elite goal scorer, at that bargain price, and still manage to build such a bad offensive team around him while relying on him to do all of the heavy lifting. Since the start of the 2011-12 season Pacioretty has scored nearly 15 percent of the Canadiens’ goals (14.5 to be exact). Among the top-10 goal-scorers during that stretch only Ovechkin (19 percent) has scored a higher percentage of his team’s goals, while Tavares, Pavelski, and Stamkos are the only other ones in that group over 14 percent.

This stunning lack of offense around him has resulted in the Canadiens simply … not winning. Over the past seven years the Canadiens have won just three playoff series during Pacioretty’s peak years. The only top-10 goal-scorers during that stretch that have been a member of teams that have won fewer are Benn and Tavares.

Seven of them have played in at least one Stanley Cup Final during that stretch.

At this point it’s almost like picking at low-hanging fruit to continue being critical of the Canadiens’ current front office and its roster decisions. They have been bad. But as long as the tree keeps providing you the fruit, you almost have no choice but to keep picking at it. The way the Canadiens have treated — and squandered — Pacioretty’s career might be one of their biggest disappointments over the past decade.

They should have been able to do more for him. And they didn’t.

Related: Marc Bergevin’s tenure has slowly but surely made the Canadiens worse

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Connor McDavid betting favorite to win MVP, even though he’s still on Oilers

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Connor McDavid was the best player in the NHL during the 2017-18 season.

He won the scoring title for the second year in a row (the first player in more than 15 years to win it in consecutive years), he topped the 100-point mark for the second year in a row, he was voted by his peers in the league as the most outstanding player for the second year in a row, and had he played on a team that was anything other than a raging season-long dumpster fire he probably would have been a lock to win the Hart Trophy as the league’s MVP for the second year in a row.

At the very least he would have a finalist.

But because he did play on a team that was a raging season-long dumpster fire, we were treated to another season-long debate on what value means and he ended up finishing fifth in the MVP voting behind Taylor Hall, Nathan MacKinnon, Anze Kopitar and Claude Giroux.

Even though the Oilers are bringing back largely the same roster that finished with the fourth worst record in the Western Conference and was nearly 20 points out of a playoff spot, McDavid is set to enter the 2018-19 season as the odds-on favorite to win the MVP award this upcoming season.

The folks at Bovada issued some preseason MVP betting odds on Thursday, and McDavid at 10/3 was at the top of the list.

As long as he stays healthy he is probably going to be the best player in the league once again and, quite honestly, the only thing that can probably stop him from winning the MVP is if the Oilers stink again.

Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby is second at 13/2, while Toronto Maple Leafs teammates Auston Matthews and John Tavares and Washington Capitals forward Alex Ovechkin round out the top-five, each at 10-1.

The reigning MVP winner, New Jersey Devils forward Taylor Hall, has the sixth best odds at 15/1.

Here is the complete list that Bovada released on Thursday:

Connor McDavid — 10/3
Sidney Crosby — 13/2
Auston Matthews — 10/1
Alexander Ovechkin — 10/1
John Tavares — 10/1
Taylor Hall — 15/1
Nikita Kucherov –15/1
Nathan MacKinnon — 15/1
Mark Scheifele — 15/1
Anze Kopitar — 18/1
Evgeni Malkin — 18/1
Patrick Kane — 20/1
Claude Giroux — 25/1
Brad Marchand — 25/1
Steven Stamkos — 25/1
Vladimir Tarasenko — 25/1
Jack Eichel — 33/1
Jamie Benn — 40/1
Patrik Laine — 40/1
Nicklas Backstrom — 50/1
Filip Forsberg — 50/1
Johnny Gaudreau — 50/1
Ilya Kovalchuk — 50/1
Evgeny Kuznetsov — 50/1
Artemi Panarin — 50/1
Tyler Seguin — 50/1
Blake Wheeler — 50/1
Logan Couture — 66/1
Phil Kessel — 75/1
Joe Pavelski — 75/1
Aleksander Barkov — 100/1
Jonathan Marchessault — 100/1
David Pastrnak — 100/1
Alexander Radulov — 100/1

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

It’s Dallas Stars day at PHT

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Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Dallas Stars.

2017-18

42-32-8, 92 pts. (6th in Central Division, 10th in Western Conference)
Missed playoffs.

IN:

Blake Comeau
Valeri Nichushkin
Roman Polak
Anton Khudobin

OUT:

Antoine Roussel
Dan Hamuis
Greg Pateryn
Mike McKenna
Curtis McKenzie

RE-SIGNED:

Mattias Janmark
Remi Elie
Devin Shore
Stephen Johns
Gemel Smith

It’s been two years since the Dallas Stars topped the Central Division with their 50-win, 109-point regular season, good for second-best in the NHL in 2015-16.

Since then, it’s been a little bit of free fallin’ in Texas.

Last season was better than the year previous, so there’s a bonus. Of course, it had to be because the Stars were atrocious in 2016-17. The addition of Ben Bishop in the crease last offseason helped, but the Stars had a single line that was able to score with regularity. Tyler Seguin, Jamie Benn and Alexander Radulov (also added last offseason), one of the best lines in hockey, each accounted for nearly a point-per-game. Of Dallas’ 231 goals last season, the lined combined for 103 of them and 229 of the Stars’ 609 combined points.

It’s a great line, but no one outside that trio had more than 20 goals or over 35 points. In fact, it was a defenseman — John Klingberg — who nestled in behind them as the team’s fourth-leading scorer. It was a hell of a season for Klingberg, take nothing away from that. But the gap between scoring is substantial and a big reason why the Stars couldn’t cobble together more wins. If their first line had an off night, the team lost. It was a simple formula for opposing team’s to key in on.

The Stars will have a new bench boss this coming season after Ken Hitchcock retired. Jim Montgomery and his puck-possession mindset take over the reins and one of his first tasks will be trying to find Jason Spezza‘s game. Spezza had an awful year, so much so he was made a healthy scratch in the wake of its terribleness. Father time hasn’t been kind to the 35-year-old over the past two seasons. He has one year left on a four-year deal that’s paying him $7.5 million per season.

The Stars do get a bit of a boost with the return of Valeri Nichushkin, who makes his return after two years spent back home playing in the KHL. Thus far, the Russian is the Stars’ biggest addition of the summer. Nichushkin seems primed to move into a second-line role and could be a part of Spezza’s revitalization.

Two scoring lines are better than one, so if Nichushkin can shock Spezza back to life, then the Stars might work themselves back into the playoff conversation.

It’s not the same type of hype train as, say, the additions of Bishop and Radulov in years’ past. Perhaps the quiet summer will bode well for Dallas.

The good news is Klingberg seems to be skating into his prime. He made a case for the Norris this year and has seen his game on the incline for a couple years now, becoming a vital part of Dallas’ offense with 67 points last season. There’s no reason to think that will change. Klingberg rebounded from a down year in 2016-17 to put up career highs, and when he played on Dallas’ good team three years ago, he put up solid numbers in just his second year in the NHL. That sky is the limit for Klingberg.

A new system put forth by Montgomery might spell good things for the Stars, who played under Hitchcock’s aging coaching style. A turnaround by the club this season might just help the Stars keep hold of Seguin, who is set for unrestricted free agency after this year.

Prospect Pool

Miro Heiskanen, D, 19, HIFK Helsinki (SM-Liiga) – 2017 first-round pick

The third-overall pick a year ago enjoyed a solid campaign in his native Finland, posting 11 goals and 23 points in 30 games while averaging the most ice-time of any player in the league with 25:06 per game. That all added up to a league all-star team nod and an award for Liiga’s best defenseman. Heiskanen looked the part at the Olympic Games in South Korea as well with one goal in five games and played in the world hockey championships and the world juniors to boot. A trifecta of sorts:

Jim Nill said he’s coming to North America this season. Some say he’s NHL ready. That could be a big boost for the Stars if he is.

Roope Hintz, LW, 21, Texas Stars (AHL) – 2015 second-round pick

The Stars like themselves some Finns. Hintz is another prospect from Finland who could make his NHL debut this season. He had 35 points in 70 regular-season games in his first pro season in the American Hockey League. In the playoffs, where the Stars were Calder Cup runners-up, Hintz had a further 12 points in 22 games.

“Roope has taken some huge strides,” Stars coach Derek Laxdal told NHL.com. “One of his assets is his speed. He is a big body (6-foot-3, 205 pounds) who can skate at a high speed, make plays at high speed. His biggest challenge throughout the year has just been playing with that consistency and playing a little heavier.”

Ty Dellandrea, C, 18, Flint Firebirds (OHL) – 2018 first-round pick

Dellandrea is the newest addition to Dallas’ prospect pool after being taken 13th overall in June’s draft. A center, Dellandrea stood out in Flint of the Ontario Hockey League despite his team’s rough season. He led the team with 27 goals and had 59 points in 67 games and models his game after Jonathan Toews, both on and off the ice. What’s not to like?

“Ty is an extremely talented two-way centerman with explosive speed, hockey intelligence and willingness to do whatever it takes to help his team succeed on the ice,” Stars director of amateur scouting Joe McDonnell said. “Over his two seasons with Flint, he has continued to improve every facet of his game and exhibits the character and work ethic that it takes to succeed in the National Hockey League.”


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck