Johansson gives Sabres scoring, versatility

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The Buffalo Sabres have added some scoring depth and some versatility with the signing of forward Marcus Johansson on Saturday.

The Sabres and Johansson agreed to a two-year, $9 million deal that carries a cap hit of $4.5 million per season. It’s a good term for Johansson, 28, who can prove his worth over the next two years and parlay that into a longer deal at the end of it.

For the Sabres, they get a player who an excellent left-winger and has the ability, if needed, to play in the middle. As Mike Harrington from the Buffalo News points out, Johansson has won 900 faceoffs in his career thus far but hasn’t played the position much since he was with the Washington Capitals.

Where he plays is still up in the air. He’s likely to start the season on the wing and in Buffalo’s top-six contingent. But the Sabres are thin at center after Jack Eichel and he would certainly see time there if need be. If nothing else, the option is there for a player that can theoretically play any of the forward positions. Johansson’s utility extends to the power play as well.

The Sabres scratched priority No. 1 off their list when they extended Jeff Skinner. They also re-upped on Zemgus Girgensons on Friday.

It’s not nearly as splashy an offseason as last year, but the Sabres are making solid moves to improve their club after it showed flashes last season. I don’t see Buffalo as a team far off from being in the playoff conversation (I figured they were going to be in it last year, so what do I know.) But adding some scoring to a team in the bottom third in the category last season is a good step in that direction.

Johansson has 20-goal capabilities, having done so twice now in his career. He played just 29 games in 2017-18 after a nasty head shot by Brad Marchand and was limited to 58 games this season because of injuries.

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Prior to that, Johansson hit the 20-goal mark in 2014-15 and then again in 2016-17, playing the NHL’s full slate of 82 games in both of those campaigns. His possession numbers in those two seasons — 53.1 percent and 52.9 percent, respectively — were his best as a pro, as well.

Johansson is simply effective when he’s healthy and if he can stay that way with the Sabres, he’s a shrewd addition to a team that is only getting better as their young stars get older.

Perhaps there’s a little superstition at play here, too.

Johansson hasn’t missed the playoffs since 2013, making it with the Capitals on four straight occasions before runs with the New Jersey Devils and most recently a Stanley Cup Final appearance with the Boston Bruins.

With the Bruins, Johansson played a critical role, scoring four times and adding seven assists in 22 games. The guy produces.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck.