Pettersson’s goal line save helps Penguins top Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins put an end to the Washington Capitals’ five-game winning streak and Alex Ovechkin‘s goal-scoring streak on Wednesday night in an intense rivalry game featuring the winners of the past three Stanley Cups.

Sidney Crosby and Bryan Rust provided the offense for the Penguins in the 2-1 win, while Matt Murray turned aside 31 of the 32 shots he faced in his second game back from injury.

The save of the night, however, did not belong to Murray. It instead went to Penguins defenseman Marcus Pettersson for sweeping a loose puck off the goal line when it was just a matter of inches from tying the game in the third period. That play happened just a few minutes after Riley Sheahan made a similar (though not as close) play on the goal line.

The Penguins acquired Pettersson just a couple of weeks ago from the Anaheim Ducks in exchange for forward Daniel Sprong.

While Sprong has taken advantage of his increased role in Anaheim and found his offensive game, Pettersson has been a solid addition to the Penguins’ third defense pair. This was by far his biggest play since the trade.

All of the Penguins’ defenders came through on Wednesday, especially their top pairing of Kris Letang and Brian Dumoulin who spent much of the night going up against Ovechkin. They needed huge minutes from them, too, because the Penguins played almost the entire game with only five defenders after Jamie Oleksiak was injured 55 seconds into the game in a fight with Capitals forward Tom Wilson.

[Related: Penguins’ Oleksiak injured in fight with Capitals’ Wilson]

The Penguins, now 9-4-3 in their past 16 games, are tied with the New York Islanders for third place in the Metropolitan Division (the Islanders currently own the tiebreaker) and are one spot back of the Montreal Canadiens for the second Wild Card spot in the Eastern Conference. Not anywhere near where they want or expect to be, but they are taking strides to get back on track after a tough start to the season.

The Capitals, meanwhile, had won five games in a row entering the night and still have a nice cushion in the division. They are also 13-4-0 in their past 17 games.

This game also snapped what was a six-game goal-scoring streak for Ovechkin who still has a league-best 29 goals in 33 games, including 17 in his past 15 games. Those are just some of the stunning numbers for him this season.

MORE: Your 2018-19 NHL on NBC TV schedule

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Stamkos joins Lightning for Stanley Cup celebration

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After controlling Game 6 against the Dallas Stars, the Tampa Bay Lightning won their second Stanley Cup in franchise history. Beyond repeat Stanley Cup champion Patrick Maroon, winning the Stanley Cup was a first for every Lightning player. Considering the road the Lightning traveled to this Stanley Cup victory, should it be surprising that they decided to mix up the celebration, and create a great moment with Steven Stamkos in the process?

As Gary Bettman noted, the Lightning chose to take that group Stanley Cup celebration photo before the trophy was raised.

In an emotional moment, Lightning captain Stamkos ended up on the ice, becoming the first Lightning player to raise the Stanley Cup, prompting a jubilant celebration from teammates. It all makes that lone goal from Game 3 even sweeter for Stamkos.

Great stuff.

Following Stamkos, Conn Smythe Trophy winner Victor Hedman got his chance to raise the Stanley Cup. Some veterans took their laps, while eventually Nikita Kucherov, Andrei Vasilevskiy, and others celebrated with the Stanley Cup.

Along with the players, Jon Cooper and GM Julien BriseBois received a chance to bask in the glory. Both played big roles in the Lightning getting this far (as did former GM Steve Yzerman, now with the Red Wings).

Watch highlights of the Lightning’s 2-0 win against the Stars in Game 6 of the 2020 Stanley Cup Final in the video below:

Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Dallas Stars (TB wins series 4-2)

Stars 4, Lightning 1 (recap)
Lightning 3, Stars 2 (recap)
Lightning 5, Stars 2 (recap)
Lighting 5, Stars 4 [OT] (recap)
Stars 3, Lightning 2 [2OT] (recap)
Lightning 2, Stars 0 (recap)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Maroon becomes back-to-back Cup winner with Blues, Lightning

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EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) — Patrick Maroon didn’t get the chance this time to lower the Stanley Cup so that his son, Anthony, could kiss it before lifting it again over his shoulders.

Anthony stayed home in the U.S., as did fiancee Francesca as Maroon celebrated with the Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday night as he became a back-to-back NHL champion. A year ago on the ice in Boston, the St. Louis native won the Cup with the Blues, his family by his side.

Maroon had his phone out for the party on the ice in Edmonton after his key steal helped set up the second goal in the 2-0 win that sealed the title.

”Just celebrating with my future wife Francesca and then my family back home,” he explained. ”I thought last year was something else, but this year was something special. I’ve been fortunate enough to be on so many good hockey teams, and to go back to back, most people don’t get the chance to play in a Stanley Cup Finals, I got to do it back to back, and win. I got the chills talking about this.”

According to NHL Stats, Maroon is just the eighth player to win the Cup in back-to-back seasons with different teams and the first since Cory Stillman in 2004 and 2006, sandwiched around the lockout year.

”It’s extremely different,” Maroon said before the final wrapped up, acknowledging the decision for his family not to join him in the bubble. ”It’s kind of been a dream. I’ve been living in a dream, honestly.”

Maroon will be the first player since Claude Lemieux in the 1990s to get his name on the Cup in consecutive years with different teams, and only those two and Stillman have done it since the expansion era began in 1967.

”I’ve been fortunate to play on some really, really good hockey teams,” Maroon said before Game 5. ”I’ve been fortunate to come back to the Stanley Cup Final, even though there’s a lot of guys that play in the league for 10-15 years that only get one opportunity at this thing. I’ve been fortunate to get two whacks at it.

”I’ve been blessed, and without my family and my teammates for all the support, I don’t think it happens.”

If the Blues don’t let Maroon go and the Lightning don’t sign him, maybe none of this happens. Tampa Bay is a different team with him after falling short many years in a row.

Maroon was a late-summer signing a couple of weeks before training camp in the summer of 2019. It was his second consecutive one-year deal, now with his sixth NHL organization, worth $900,000 – roughly half his St. Louis salary.

It has been a perfect fit, even if Maroon hasn’t been as prominent as he was in the Blues’ run, when he scored a series-clinching, double-overtime goal in the second round to eliminate the same Dallas Stars he and the Lightning defeated in the final. But along with trade deadline pickups Barclay Goodrow and Blake Coleman and free agent signings Zach Bogosian and Luke Schenn, Maroon has played a big role in bulking up the Lightning enough to get the job done.

”The M.O. on us and the Lightning over the last few years is that they’re offensive and they’re skilled and the way to beat them is to play them hard,” said Game 4 overtime hero Kevin Shattekirk, also a new addition. ”Things have changed this year.”

Coach Jon Cooper knew Maroon had the potential to change the complexion of the team. He coached Maroon from 2005-07 with Texarkana and St. Louis Bandits of the North American Hockey League, kept in touch over the years and followed his career closely.

Cooper remembers Maroon going from an overweight 17-year-old who had to do extra work to get in shape to a dominant player at that level. Maroon grew into his 6-foot-3, 225-pound frame as a player, grew up as a person and became an NHL regular.

In February, Maroon’s mother was diagnosed with breast cancer – he told NBC she beat it and was healthy – and he was hoping to bring the Cup home to her.

”You never know when you’re going to come back, so you’ve got to take every opportunity and cherish it,” he said.

Maroon dressed in all 25 Tampa Bay games this postseason, providing some much-needed muscle and filling a vital role in front of the net on the power play.

”He’s a good teammate, and he knows his role, so he knows the minutes he’s going to get,” Cooper said. ”I’d give guys roles and make sure they all know what they are, and he knows his. He’s got character, and he is a character. It’s two good attributes to have.”

Watching Maroon play elsewhere, Cooper often ”sneakily” whispered to former Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman, ”Hey Steve, if we got the chance.”

It was new GM Julien BriseBois who got the chance and took it, and now they are all Stanley Cup champions.

Lightning win Stanley Cup by smothering Stars in Game 6

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For the second time in franchise history, and the first with this current set of stars, the Tampa Bay Lightning won the Stanley Cup.

After the Stars survived elimination by winning Game 5 in double overtime, the Lightning absolutely locked the Stars down in Game 6, winning 2-0 to take the series 4-2.

Following the Lightning putting their own spin on the Stanley Cup celebration, Victor Hedman received the Conn Smythe Trophy.

Lightning win second Stanley Cup in franchise history after beating Stars in Game 6

When contests are as one-sided as Game 6 of the 2020 Stanley Cup Final was, you can get into chicken-and-the-egg arguments.

How much blame do you put on the Stars for an effort that lacked much energy? The Stars only managed eight shots on goal through the first 40 minutes.

To be fair, there was a late push. The Stars ultimately reached 21 shots on goal when they found some energy down 2-0 in the third, but it was too little, too late.

For Stars fans, this was a painful way to watch a season end for a team that otherwise continuously found ways to dig deep during this surprising playoff run.

But it’s easy to point a finger at the losing team and forget what the winners accomplished.

[NBC 2020 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Top players and supporting cast members shine for Tampa Bay

In knocking out the Blue Jackets, Bruins, and Islanders, the Lightning asserted their ability to handle tough defenses and small margins for error. As explosive as Tampa Bay is, Game 6 of the 2020 Stanley Cup Final serves as textbook example of how strong a defensive team they can be.

The Lightning didn’t force the Stars to parade to the penalty box, but some key early calls ended up being all the Bolts needed. On their second power-play opportunity, Brayden Point flustered Anton Khudobin with an initial shot, and then cashed in on the rebound.

During the second period, Blake Coleman completed a pretty span of passing and transition hockey. As you may have heard, Coleman grew up as a Stars fan living close to Dallas, so scoring a big goal in the Lightning’s Stanley Cup-clinching game must feel surreal.

You know, especially since it happened close to October.

Redemption for the Lightning in impressive Stanley Cup win

After the heartache and humiliation from being swept by the Blue Jackets, the Lightning won the Stanley Cup in remarkably convincing fashion. You won’t see many teams win it all without facing elimination, but the Lightning did just that during this run.

Whenever the 2020-21 season begins, the salary cap will likely force some changes for the Lightning.

Many of the core players should be around, though, and that’s a scary thought for the rest of the NHL. Nikita Kucherov was brilliant with Point and Ondrej Palat. Andrei Vasilevskiy‘s dominance went a bit under the radar because of the many other standpoint performances. And, finally, Victor Hedman asserted himself as possibly the best defenseman in the world.

The Stars likely aren’t happy with their efforts in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, yet it’s impressive that they got this far, including against the juggernaut Lightning.

Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Dallas Stars (TB wins series 4-2)

Stars 4, Lightning 1 (recap)
Lightning 3, Stars 2 (recap)
Lightning 5, Stars 2 (recap)
Lighting 5, Stars 4 [OT] (recap)
Stars 3, Lightning 2 [2OT] (recap)
Lightning 2, Stars 0

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Veteran Dallas Stars come up short of Stanley Cup title

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All those wily, old veterans couldn’t get the Dallas Stars another Stanley Cup championship.

Rick Bowness is the 65-year-old interim head coach who has been behind NHL benches in parts of five different decades. Joe Pavelski and Corey Perry are the veteran forwards in their mid-30s who spent their entire careers with their original teams before signing with Dallas in free agency last summer just for this chance.

Instead of a title for the aged after the best efforts of those grizzled guys to get the Stars this far, their season ended with a 2-0 loss to Tampa Bay in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final in Edmonton on Monday night.

”Anyone who’s ever won a Stanley Cup will tell you that to win the Cup, you’ve got to be lucky and you’ve got to be healthy,” Bowness said. ”I’m proud of our players. They gave us everything they could. Was there enough in the tank tonight. No, there wasn’t.”

Dallas was finally undone by mounting injuries and the failure of primary front-liners Jamie Benn, Tyler Seguin and Alexander Radulov to score even a single goal in the final series. Perry and Pavelski combined for the last six goals scored by the Stars in this most unusual season.

”Emotions are tough right now,” Seguin said.

The Stars allowed yet another power-play goal in the finale. They were 0 of 3 with a man advantage Monday night, and 1 of 19 in the series – the only such goal came from Pavelski in the second period of Game 2.

A goal in double overtime of Game 5 by the 35-year-old Perry had extended the series. It was his second goal that night and Pavelski had the third in that 3-2 win. That was also Pavelski’s 61st career playoff goal, the most ever by a U.S.-born skater and good enough for 29th on the all-time list with exactly half of Wayne Gretzky’s record 122.

Before his two goals in Game 4, Pavelski was tied with American Mike Modano, who was part of the Stars’ only Stanley Cup championship team in 1999. After 14 goals in 67 regular-season games for the Stars, Pavelski had 13 more inside the bubble — the most ever in a single postseason by a player 36 or older.

The scoring records are no consolation for Pavelski, who last summer wanted to sign with a team that would give him another chance to win a Stanley Cup. His two finalists were the Stars and the Lightning; he got a three-year deal from Dallas

”Keep it. Next question,” Pavelski said when asked about the records after Game 4.

Perry spent his first 14 NHL seasons with Anaheim and was part of the Ducks’ 2007 championship in his second year. They bought out the forward’s deal before he signed a one-year contract with the Stars.

Pavelski’s only other trip to the Stanley Cup Final was five seasons ago when San Jose lost in six games to Pittsburgh. That was his first season as captain of the Sharks, for which he had played since 2006-07. His rookie season was the same year Perry got to raise the Stanley Cup at age 22.

The found a welcome home in Dallas under Bowness, promoted by Dallas in December after Jim Montgomery was fired for off-ice issues. Bowness used to be the top assistant for coach Jon Cooper in Tampa Bay and was part of the Lightning’s runner-up run in 2015.

The Stars went into the Stanley Cup Final off their longest break between games during more than two months inside the NHL bubble after they wrapped up the Western Conference Final in five games against top-seeded Vegas. They came out hitting against Tampa Bay to win the opener 4-1, but allowed six power-play goals in losing the next three games.

Tampa Bay was 0 for 1 on the power play in Game 5, but went ahead ahead to stay when Brayden Point scored about 12 1/2 minutes in after John Klingberg‘s tripping penalty. Blake Coleman, the 28-year-old center from Plano, Texas, who grew up a Stars fan, scored the other Lightning goal.

Dallas finished the season with several injured key regulars, including forwards Radek Faksa, Blake Comeau and Roope Hintz. Ben Bishop, their primary goaltender most of the regular season, appeared in only three postseason games, the last one Aug. 31 in a second-round game.

”We’re two wins away from winning the Stanley Cup,. We gave it all,” Klingberg said. ”Key players got hurt, we grinded out. Had playing coming in, stepping up doing a great job. I’m proud of this team, this organization, for what we’ve done.”