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NHL suspends Nate Schmidt 20 games; Golden Knights ‘strongly disagree’

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Last season bordered on magical for Vegas Golden Knights defenseman Nate Schmidt. The 2018-19 season may feel more like a nightmare, at least to start.

The NHL rendered an eyebrow-raising verdict on Sunday, handing Schmidt a 20-game suspension -without pay – for violating the terms of the NHL/NHLPA Performance Enhancing Substances Program.

Such a suspension also includes a mandatory referral to the NHL/NHLPA Program for Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health “for evaluation and possible treatment.”

The NHL didn’t detail the substance Schmidt tested positive for.

If the league suspending Schmidt for almost a quarter of the season doesn’t blow your mind enough, the responses from the team and player should do the trick.

The Golden Knights noted “a trace amount” of whatever substance, and that they didn’t agree with the suspension:

“We were notified that the NHL has suspended Nate Schmidt for violating the terms of the NHL/NHLPA Performance Enhancing Substances Program. While we respect the NHL/NHLPA Performance Enhancing Substances Program and are committed to its success, we strongly disagree with the suspension. We firmly believe that the presence of a trace of the banned substance was accidental and unintentional. Based on our conversations with Nate, analysis from independent medical experts and sworn testimony from the parties involved, we believe it is clear Nate was not able to reasonably ascertain how the substance entered his body.

Nate is an honest person with high moral character and great integrity. We will stand by him and support him during this time.”

While that felt a little bit soaked in PR-speak (though still strongly-worded by those terms), Schmidt’s statement almost demands a gasp.

[MORE: Looking back at the suspensions for Horcoff, Konopoka, and Tinordi.]

The full release will be listed in a moment, but grab your popcorn and enjoy a few selected highlights (for those of you whose eyes might glaze over during a longer reading session?):

  • Early in the statement, Schmidt notes how surreal it is for him, not to mention all of us, adding that “I have only used supplements provided by my NHL team and I have always been extremely careful about what I put into my body.”
  • He went to essentially get second and third opinions, which led him to state that the “7 billionths of a milligram/mL” of the mystery substance was compared by an expert to “the equivalent of a pinch of salt in an Olympic-sized swimming pool.” Wow.
  • Most simply, Schmidt wrote that “I do not agree with the suspension and will not be labeled a cheater.”
  • It appears, then, that Schmidt lost his appeal.

OK, here’s the full statement:

“I am extremely disappointed to learn that I have been suspended for a violation of the NHL/ NHLPA Performance Enhancing Substances Program. The fact that I’m issuing this statement is surreal to me as I have only used supplements provided by my NHL team and I have always been extremely careful about what I put into my body. Throughout my playing career I have been tested numerous times, including twice last season, and I have never before tested positive. It was utterly shocking to be informed that I tested positive for a microscopic amount of a tainted substance. Not only did I not intentionally take a banned substance, I could not have received any performance enhancement benefit from the trace amount that inadvertently got into my system at a level that was far too small to have any effect. This low amount was consistent with environmental contamination that I could not possibly have prevented.

One of the experts in environmental contamination who testified on my behalf at the Appeal hearing described the amount of the substance found in my system – 7 billionths of a milligram/mL – as the equivalent of a pinch of salt in an Olympic-sized swimming pool. Another expert analyzed a sample of my hair and concluded there was no evidence of intentional use. The Vegas Golden Knights track players’ strength and performance metrics and my results have remained constant over the past year.

While I support having a strong Performance Enhancing Substances Program in place for our sport, it is difficult to accept this suspension. I understand that I will miss these games, but I do not agree with the suspension and I will not accept being labelled a cheater.

I have worked my whole life to become an NHL player, and I’m extremely proud to be a player in the NHL. I have never cut corners in order to achieve this goal. I am grateful for the support of the entire Golden Knights organization and I can’t put into words how disappointed I am that I will not be on the ice at the beginning of the season to help my teammates work towards another Stanley Cup run.”

In every single case, the NHL, Golden Knights, and Schmidt noted that there would be no further statements.

There’s also this from Schmidt’s agent:

Staggering stuff. Testing violations simply don’t happen very often in the NHL, for whatever reason, with three names coming to mind: Shawn Horcoff, Zenon Konopka, and Jarred Tinordi. Schmidt, 27, is set to enter a contract year in 2018-19, carrying a $2.25 million cap hit and $2.3M salary, via Cap Friendly.

Cap Friendly also notes that the actual pay situation is a bit more complicated.

The Golden Knights are losing a huge part of what made their Cinderella season work. Schmidt generated 36 points in 2017-18, more than doubling his previous career-high. He logged 22:14 TOI per game during the regular season, only to see his duties expand during Vegas’ run to the 2018 Stanley Cup Final, averaging 24:25 minutes per night. Schmidt topped Golden Knights skaters in average ice time in both the regular season and postseason.

Next season seemed like an opportunity for Schmidt to cement his place as a go-to defenseman, and earn a raise from his current bargain rate. To put things mildly, that situation is now far from settled.

MORE: How will Schmidt suspension affect Vegas Golden Knights?

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Erik Karlsson misses Sharks game on Saturday

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Considering how much Erik Karlsson has been heating up along with the San Jose Sharks lately, it would have been fun to see him skate against the Tampa Bay Lightning, a team that once tried to acquire him.

That’s not happening on Saturday, as Karlsson was a late scratch for the game.

The Athletic’s Kevin Kurz reports that Karlsson was “limping noticeably” and favoring his left side following the Sharks’ 6-3 loss to the Coyotes on Wednesday. Kurz also reports that Karlsson hasn’t participated in practice or pregame skates for about a week.

Paul Gackle of the Mercury News points out that Karlsson was held out for most of the third period of Tuesday’s 5-2 win against the Penguins for “precautionary reasons,” yet Sharks coach Peter DeBoer indicated that the 28-year-old was expected to play on Saturday. Instead, Karlsson must have determined that he wasn’t good to go after skating a bit during warm-ups.

Saturday’s game against the Lightning marks the second of a four-game road trip. The Sharks are set to play against the Panthers in Florida on Monday (Jan. 21) and the Capitals in Washington on Tuesday (Jan. 22), then they’ll be off for the All-Star break.

Karlsson was one of the Sharks’ three selections to the 2019 NHL All-Star Game, but we’ll see if what seems like a lower-body injury ends up sidelining him from the event. Either way, it wouldn’t be surprising to see the Swede miss at least one of the Sharks’ remaining two games before the break, considering that it’s a back-to-back set.

Marc-Edouard Vlasic is also out with an injury, so the Sharks are limping – can Sharks limp? – a bit into that run of off time.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Hurricanes’ Brind’Amour latest coach to put his team on blast

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Sure, you can have a high-up team executive call you out and compare you to horse excrement.

That’s one thing.

But when your coach, who is nearly a decade removed from playing his last NHL game, contemplates dressing because his team is that bad, that’s another.

And then to top it all off, that coach then apologies to a newly-acquired player on behalf of the team that he coaches.

That stings.

We’ve seen a couple of outbursts this year that haven’t been seen in some time — if ever.

Carolina Hurricanes legend Rod Brind’Amour is the latest to eviscerate his team publicly in what seems to be the in-fashion way to get the message across these days.

Who can forget Jim Lites’ tirade in Dallas?

Or Bruce Boudreau’s rant?

Or David Quinn putting his team on blast earlier this week?

Now you can add Brind’Amour to the list.

“We were so bad, I almost dressed and got out there,” Brind’Amour said after the Hurricanes fell 4-1 to the Ottawa Senators on Friday. “I might have been as good as what we were throwing out there. We just didn’t want to play the way we were supposed to. I didn’t know what I was watching. That’s the first time all year I can say that.”

If that wasn’t the kill shot, Brind’Amour then feeling the need to apologize to Nino Niederreiter certainly was.

The latter was picked up in a trade earlier this week for Victor Rask. In his first game, his new teammates crapped the proverbial bed.

“Good. I thought he was fine,” Brind’Amour said about Niederreiter’s debut. “He had a couple chances. I think the first shift he almost had a breakaway. … I apologized to him for that effort. That’s not our team, and that’s his first game.”

It’s not often you hear about that sort of thing.

The Hurricanes had won seven-of-eight before dropping a 6-2 decision to the New York Rangers and Friday’s loss to the visiting Senators.

The Hurricanes are now nine points adrift from the final wildcard spot in the Eastern Conference.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Devils’ Palmieri replaces injured Hall at NHL All-Star Game

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New Jersey Devils forward Taylor Hall is going to take the team’s upcoming bye week to heal, and that will include missing the 2019 NHL All-Star Game.

The Devils made the announcement on Saturday, with Jersey boy Kyle Palmieri set to take his spot at SAP Center in San Jose next weekend.

“It’s a pretty cool honor,” Palmieri told reporters prior to the Devils game against the Anaheim Ducks on Saturday “Obviously, it will be my first one so looking forward to that. I’d easily trade it to have [Hall] backs in the lineup and be healthy but it’s a cool opportunity for me and I’m looking forward to it.”

Palmieri has had a solid season for the lowly Devils, posting 22 goals and 16 assists in 47 games.

“It’s nice to see Kyle really develop as an NHL player over the fours years since he’s been traded from Anaheim,” Devils coach John Hynes told reporters on Saturday. “He’s come in here. He’s played a big role. He’s improved his game. He’s a big, big part of our team and it’s nice to see him continue to develop. It’s certainly a nice honor.”

Hall remains sidelined with a lower-body injury and hasn’t skated since a game on Dec. 23.

The Devils sit in 26th place overall in the NHL standings and are fighting for better lottery odds at this point.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Concussion lawsuit settlement deadline for players extended

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By Stephen Whyno (AP Hockey Writer)

The deadline for retired players to opt in to the $18.9 million settlement of the concussion lawsuit against the NHL has been extended.

Players’ attorneys confirmed the extension to The Associated Press on Friday night. It was not immediately clear what the new deadline was.

The 318 former players who sued the league and accused it of failing to protect them from head injuries or warning them of the risks involved with playing initially had until the Friday to opt in to the settlement that was reached 75 days ago.

Each player who opts in would receive $22,000 and could be eligible for up to $75,000 in medical treatment. The settlement is significantly less than the billion-dollar agreement reached between the NFL and its former players on the same issue of head injuries.

Charles Zimmerman, a lead attorney for players, said earlier in the day participation is ”very good” so far, adding there were still some players who needed to be contacted for their decisions.

”The vast majority of eligible retired players have agreed to participate in the proposed NHL concussion settlement,” players’ lawyers said in a statement. ”Plaintiffs’ counsel, however, have encountered difficulties reaching some eligible retired players to discuss the settlement. Thus, at the request of plaintiffs’ counsel, the NHL has agreed to extend the participation deadline to allow completion of those communications.”

Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly referred the matter to plaintiffs’ lawyers and said the NHL would have no comment.

Daniel Carcillo, a vocal critic of the league and the settlement, said he would not be opting in and knew more 10-12 other former players who also were not. Carcillo said Friday he wanted his day in court with the league but didn’t begrudge anyone who wanted to opt in and take the $22,000.

Carcillo said he has fielded calls from more than 20 heads of individual teams’ alumni associations and that he has tried to tell any player who asks the facts of the lawsuit without injecting his opinion. Carcillo pointed to

”If 22’s enough for you and you need it, then go ahead,” said Carcillo, who played 474 regular-season and playoff games from 2007-2015. ”I won’t judge anybody who takes it. I don’t judge the guys who (played) five games and they saw an opportunity. But I also say this so that people understand why it’s such a disrespectful number because right now (the NHL doesn’t) feel that threatened.”

Reed Larson, who played 936 NHL regular-season and playoff games, said he signed on to be part of the settlement but understood why some players with serious health problems decided not to because the money wouldn’t cut it for them. There is a clause in the settlement that allows the NHL to terminate it if 100 percent of players don’t accept, but Larson said lawyers are not concerned.

”They think everything will go ahead and move ahead and they don’t see any reason why it won’t,” Larson said.

AP Hockey Writer John Wawrow contributed to this report.

Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno

More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports