Three questions facing Anaheim Ducks

Getty Images
2 Comments

Each day in the month of August we’ll be examining a different NHL team — from looking back at last season to discussing a player under pressure to focusing on a player coming off a breakthrough year to asking questions about the future. Today we look at the Anaheim Ducks.

Will they be able to improve shot suppression?

Anaheim’s goaltenders know what busy nights look like. Night after night they’ve been facing a ton of rubber from opponents and thanks to the play of the backstops like Frederik Andersen and John Gibson and their offensive weapons, they’ve been able to come out on the winning end of most games. 

The number of shots the Ducks have allowed has increased in each of the last three seasons. From 27.5/game in 2015-16 to 29.6/game (Randy Carlyle’s first season back in charge) to a whopping 33.1/game last season. You probably won’t be surprised to read that in Carlyle’s two full seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs they allowed 32.3 and 35.9 shots per game, respectively. Be prepared, John Gibson and Ryan Miller.

[Looking Back at 2017-18 | Under Pressure | Building Off a Breakthrough]

Not much was done this off-season by general manager Bob Murray to help in that area. Andrej Sustr and Luke Schenn were brought in to help the defense. Prospects Marcus Pettersson and Jacob Larsson could lend a hand in the back, but the blue line will again rely heaviest on Cam Fowler, Hampus Lindholm, Josh Manson and Brandon Montour.

What will be affected most by Murray’s “change” promise?

The Ducks weren’t going to be in the free agent market looking to lure a big fish on a long-term contract. There are enough of those on the roster at the moment; so it was a quiet July on the signing new talent front. Instead, Murray focused on keeping the likes of Adam Henrique and Brandon Montour and working on new deals for RFAs Ondrej Kase and Nick Ritchie.

The only real big change so far was the firing of assistant coach Steve Konowalchuk after one season.

No big trade or any sort of roster hacking this summer for Murray, but that doesn’t mean the leash is a long one should the Ducks get off to a slow start.

“I think the players better look in the mirror pretty quick,” he told Eric Stephens of The Athletic in June. “Let’s put it this way. Come September, I’m starting with a real hard look at the leadership group. And we’ll work from that.”

Are Caryle and Murray sharing a hot seat?

Over the last four seasons the Ducks have made the Western Conference Final twice and exited in the first round twice. The playoff loss at the hands of the San Jose Sharks in April was the first time the franchise had been swept in a series since 1999. Carlyle and Murray have presided over much success since they reunited two years ago, but this season they’ll need their youth step up and make themselves known in order to help keep the team competitive going forward.

Murray’s been the GM since 2008 and has a contract through the 2019-20 season. Ownership has stuck by his side through the ups and downs of the last decade, but is another disappointing season one that could finally force a change?

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.