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The best hockey moments of 2017 (PHT Year in Review)

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(Pro Hockey Talk is taking a look back at the year in hockey. We’ll be presenting you with the best goals, saves, moments, players and much more as we bring you the best of 2017.)

We’ll remember the champions, the award winners, the big goals and the big saves from the past year, but there are also plenty of stories that were memorable in different ways. Some are serious, some are fun, and in the end they’ll be part of the story that hockey in the year 2017 told.

Here are our 15 favorite moments from the hockey world in 2017.

15. Dart Guy introduces himself to the hockey world

Jason Maslakow drove from Waterloo, Ont. to Washington D.C. for Game 2 of the Toronto Maple Leafs’ first-round series against the Washington Capitals in April. Television cameras caught him during the game and the reaction from fans went through the roof. His face was painted with a leaf on it, his beard was dyed blue, there was a Stanley Cup shaved into his head and a cigarette hanging from his mouth. He quickly became known as “Dart Guy,” and fans soon turned the image into memes and used it as their social media avatars.

The 37-year-old’s life changed after that night. The Leafs invited him to attend Game 3 at Air Canada Centre; he took part in various appearances around the city; he eventually gave up smoking and encouraged other fans to follow him; and he even has his own TSN radio show.

14. Andre Burakovsky mistakes random car for Uber, gets ride anyway

Instagram / @manny4prez

We’ve all had this experience, right? You’re waiting on your Uber or Lyft driver to arrive and you think you see them, you pop open the door and then you are embarrassed to learn you almost entered the wrong car. Well, it happened to the Washington Capitals forward last February on his way home from a Top Golf location during the team’s bye week. The driver, Manny Nicolas, didn’t believe who it was at first and was finally convinced when Burakovsky showed him some photos on his phone.

13. Meet the “Dancing goalie from Brampton”

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNz6oSrZDAk%5D

Noah Young may be eight years old, but he’s got the dances moves of a seasoned professional. While he had been dancing regularly during games during his young career, one set of moves was caught on video and went viral as he bounced to “Juju On That Beat” by Zay Hilfigerrr and Zayion McCall. That led to him being invited to practice for the ECHL’s Brampton Beast where he got to teach goaltenders Andrew D’Agostini and Zach Fucale exactly what it takes to look smooth out there.

12. Hockey player gets new heart, hits the ice again

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qph-MW6fqZE%5D

Six years ago, Tyler Jaenicke ended a shift unable to catch his breath. After experiencing the issue for several days, he was checked out by a doctor and told the life-altering news. At age 17, he was diagnosed with idiopathic cardiomyopathy, a form of heart failure. He had a implantable cardioverter defibrillator put in and had to walk away from the game he loved. In 2016, his heart began failing and surgery was required. He was then placed on the heart transplant list.

Two months after having a battery-operated pump implanted, Jaenicke was notified that a donor heart was available. Forty-eight hours later he underwent a transplant and then went through months of rehab, all while sticking to his goal of playing hockey again. He succeeded and returned to the ice in October as part of Davenport University’s hockey team.

“You just can’t give up on life no matter what it is you’re going through,” Jaenicke told MLive.com. “I’ve been able to reach out to a few kids going through what I went through, and I understand what a difference that can make.”

11. Vladimir Tarasenko’s special birthday surprise

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oLzf7lBsbQ%5D

During the St. Louis Blues’ Casino Night, Tarasenko was the winning bidder on a trip for two on the team plane to see them on the road in Arizona and Colorado. The prize obviously wasn’t for the Russian superstar but instead for his friend Arianna Dougan, an 11-year-old who was fighting neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer. A week later, she was invited to meet the team after practice where she received a jersey from head coach Mike Yeo and also handed Tarasenko a box full of cupcakes (blue sprinkles, of course.)

Sadly, Ari would pass away in November and the Blues would honor her during their Hockey Fights Cancer night by wearing bedazzled warmups jerseys.

10. Connor McDavid and that awkward fan photo

It’s no surprise that the Edmonton Oilers star is stopped at the airport with photo requests from fans, but one last May took on a life of its own because of the look on his face. He told the story of what happened on the Puck Soup Podcast in June:

“I was walking into the security line and I had actually walked past them. And then they say ‘hey Connor can we get a picture?’ and I say ‘sure’ and sure enough they come up to me and start hugging me.  Both of them. Both of them were hugging me.  And sure enough there was someone who had their phone ready to take a picture. They had already turned around and were ready for the picture and took the picture before I had even realized what was going on. The whole thing lasted seven seconds and then I was out of there.”

9. Chris Pronger’s smiling check on Justin Bieber

AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

Remember the celebrity game during All-Star Weekend in January? No? I’ll bet you remember this photo, thought. That’s all you need to remember, really.

8. Brian Boyle scores first goal after cancer diagnosis

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZ6a2XHwGmA%5D

Leukemia wasn’t going to stop Boyle from playing the game he loves. After missing the first month of the season for treatment, he returned in early November to the New Jersey Devils’ lineup. In his fifth game back, he scored on Cam Talbot, which unleashed plenty of emotion from the veteran forward.

“I’ve never cried after a goal before,” Boyle told MSG’s Deb Placey during the first intermission. “It’s a lot. It’s everything… These guys, my wife, my kids, they’ve been through a lot, too. My parents, my siblings, it’s a good feeling.”

7. Craig Anderson’s emotional Bill Masterton Trophy speech

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUBxfQ89GQM%5D

Anderson had to take several absences away from his Ottawa Senators teammates as his wife, Nicholle, fought a rare throat cancer. She would go into remission in May and a month later the netminder was awarded the 2017 Masterton Trophy and delivered this memorable line: “Live for the now.”

6. Alex Ovechkin delivers hat trick for fan on Hockey Fights Cancer Night

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGHYv2ocvkw%5D

When Ovechkin promised Alex Luey that he would score for him against the Toronto Maple Leafs last month, he told the 13-year-old he would try and find him in the crowd. The Washington Capitals captain tallied a hat trick that night to help make the young cancer survivor’s night.

5. Dave Strader returns to Dallas Stars broadcast booth

As he battled bile duct cancer, the play-by-play man returned in February to call a Stars game against the Tampa Bay Lightning. It ended in dramatic fashion as captain Jamie Benn fired home the overtime goal. After the celebrations ended, the players all gathered at center ice to salute Strader.

The long-time hockey broadcaster would pass away in October and was further remembered when the team held their Hockey Fights Cancer night in early November. Days before he was honored as the 2017 Foster Hewitt Award, Strader’s son, Trevor, performed the national anthem before the Stars game that night.

4. Bryan Bickell scores first career shootout goal in final NHL game

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v4_ZMfqsXM%5D

Through 395 NHL games, Bickell had only taken one attempt in the shootout. Knowing it was his final game, the Carolina Hurricanes forward scored, five months after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. You can see how much the moment meant not only to Bickell and his wife, but also to his teammates.

3. Jamie Benn promises goal for car crash survivor, delivers

The first time Kendra Murray met Benn she was in a hospital room recovering from a car crash that took the lives of two of her friends. The next time she saw him was at a morning skate in October, eight months after the accident. After chatting with general manager Jim Nill, she got to see Tyler Seguin, who visited her that day with Benn, again, and then she met up with the Stars captain who told her, “I’ll score for you. I’ll make sure it’s for you.”

Sure enough, he did early in the second period of that night’s game against the Colorado Avalanche.

“I was like ‘Oh my God, he did it,’” Murray told Pro Hockey Talk in October. “That’s actually for me and I knew that it was for me. It was so crazy. It was the first goal, too. It made the Stars be ahead in the game which was awesome.”

2. Viktor Arvidsson assists Predators fan in marriage proposal

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLhEa4snjXU%5D

“Don’t drop it,” were the words of advice from Matt Irwin. The Nashville Predators forward was tasked with delivering an engagement ring on his way to the Bridgestone Arena ice for warmups. When he took off his glove and handed the ring to Morgan Landsberg, her face filled with shock and confusion. She turned around and then saw her now-fiancee Conor Payne get down on one knee and pop the question. She said yes and now has one of the better engagement stories out there.

1. Golden Knights honor Vegas shooting victims and first responders

After the tragic mass shooting on Oct. 1 just blocks from T-Mobile Arena, the Vegas Golden Knights held a ceremony prior to their first home game to pay tribute to the victims and first responders. The team introduced doctors, firemen, nurses, paramedics and police officers, who were each accompanied by a Golden Knights player. There was also a 58-second moment of silence remembering the 58 victims with their names superimposed on the ice. The advertisements on the boards were replaced with the #VegasStrong hashtag.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Io4O56G95cY%5D

To end the ceremony, Deryk Engelland, a Vegas native, spoke to the crowd reminding them they are all “Vegas strong.” He would later score in the franchise’s first ever win.

Previously:

The top hockey bloopers of 2017

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Flames’ Hamonic is first player to opt out of NHL’s return

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Flames defenseman Travis Hamonic has been the first player to opt out of the NHL’s Return to Play program.

“Earlier this evening Travis called me to inform us that he has decided to opt out of the NHL Return to Play Program,” said Flames general manager Brad Treliving. “Travis explained that due to family considerations, he has made the difficult decision not to participate in the Stanley Cup Qualifier and Playoffs.

“While we will miss Travis in our line-up, we understand and respect his decision. Our focus remains on preparation for training camp and our upcoming series in the NHL Qualifying Round.”

[Full Stanley Cup Qualifying Round schedule]

As part of the RTP plan that was ratified Friday evening, any player can opt out without penalty by Monday’s 5 p.m. ET deadline.

In a statement posted through his agent’s Twitter account, Hamonic cited a respiratory virus his young daughter battled last year and the recent birth of his son as the reasons why he will not be joining the Flames.

“My family has and always will come first,” he said. “Being my little kids’ dad every day is the most important job I have.”

The 29-year-old Hamonic, who is set to become an unrestricted free agent this off-season, played 50 games for Calgary this season. He recorded 12 points and was second the team in average ice time per game (21:12) behind Mark Giordano.

The Flames will face the Jets in a best-of-five Stanley Cup Qualifier series in the Edmonton hub

MORE:
NHL, NHLPA ratify CBA, return to play agreement
NHL salary cap to stay flat at $81.5M

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Hockey is back: NHL, NHLPA ratify CBA, return to play agreement

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The NHL and NHLPA made the return official: hockey is back.

Remarkably, the NHL and NHLPA also extended the Collective Bargaining Agreement through at least 2025-26, ensuring almost unthinkable labor peace for fans. None of this means that COVID-19 won’t wreck the party, but the NHL and NHLPA cemented those return details on Friday.

The timetable for the NHL return won’t leave much room to breathe. Players can opt-out of a return-to-play plan for a variety of reasons, but must make such decisions by Monday, July 13 at 5 p.m. ET.

This comes shortly after the two sides announced a memorandum of understanding earlier this week. The NHL attempting a two-city, 24-team playoff plan is bold enough; extending the CBA through at least 2025-26 makes this an incredible achievement. For hockey fans who’ve grown accustomed to lockouts, lasting labor peace feels almost unthinkable.

If hockey fans need more reasons to be ecstatic, consider this. The CBA extension sets the stage for NHL players to participate in the 2022 and 2026 Winter Olympics. That decision hinges on an agreement between the league and the International Olympic Committee, but this is a landmark day for the future of the NHL.

[Full schedule for 2020 Stanley Cup Qualifiers]

Read more about the NHL return via this official document:

NHL playoff hubs in Edmonton and Toronto; 2020 Stanley Cup Final in Edmonton

After many twists and turns, Edmonton and Toronto were named as the two hub cities. Each city will host 12 teams (limited to 52 personnel apiece). Edmonton will hold the 12 Western Conference teams, and is also the planned spot for the 2020 Stanley Cup Final. Meanwhile, the 12 Eastern Conference teams will play in Toronto.

With COVID-19 spikes in areas like Las Vegas and protocol stumbles in Vancouver, it’s been difficult to forecast which cities would serve as the two hubs. Now we know. Edmonton, in particular, has avoided the worst of COVID-19 outbreaks. Toronto’s dealt with more struggles (see: the outbreaks in Ontario in the map below), but brings some strengths for the NHL while not being hit as hard as many problem areas in the U.S.:

Alberta with 8,482 cases; Ontario with 36,178 as of Thursday (via the Canadian government)

[More on Edmonton and Toronto serving as NHL playoff hubs.]

Now, for the when: Key Dates for 2020 Stanley Cup Playoffs, NHL Free Agency, Draft

So, we just covered the “where” for the NHL’s playoff return to award a 2020 Stanley Cup. Let’s cover the “when.”

July 13: Training camps open (Phase 3) and 5 p.m. ET deadline for players to opt out
July 26: Teams report to their hub city
July 28-30: Exhibition games
Aug 1: Stanley Cup Qualifiers begin (Phase 4)
Aug 10: Phase 2 of NHL Draft Lottery to determine No. 1 overall pick
Aug 11: First Round begins
Aug 25: Second Round begins
Sept. 8: Conference Finals begin
Sept. 22: Stanley Cup Final begins
Oct 4: Last possible date for Stanley Cup to be awarded
Oct. 9-10: 2020 NHL Draft (must follow end of Cup Final and take place before free agency)
Mid-Oct.: free agent period opens
Nov. 17: Training camps open for 2020-21 season
Dec. 1: 2020-21 NHL season begins

All of dates listed are, of course, tentative.

[Want even more details on critical dates for the NHL return? Click here.]

CBA extension keeps NHL salary cap flat for at least 2020-21

NHL, NHLPA hammer out a CBA extension, including flat salary cap and return to Olympics

Again, these agreements don’t just cover a playoff format where the 2020 Stanley Cup would be awarded. The CBA extension means lockout prevention through 2025-26, and possibly even 2026-27. That CBA extension sets the stage for the NHL’s return to the Olympics, pending an agreement with the IOC.

Consider some of the high points. You can read more about the flat cap and other financial details here.

  • It’s possible that the two sides could extend the CBA for one additional season (through 2026-27).
  • The two sides agreed to a flat $81.5 million salary cap for 2020-21.
  • That $81.5 million mark could also stick for multiple seasons. It all hinges on whether or not revenue bounces back — and when.
  • Players hate escrow, so limiting its impact was key. There will be a 20-percent cap on escrow for 2020-21. From there, escrow will scale down until it drops to six percent.
  • The two sides agreed to bring NHL players back to Olympic competition — pending negotiations with the International Olympic Committee. If that goes through, NHL players would participate in 2022 Winter Olympics (in Beijing) and the 2026 Winter Olympics (in Milan).
  • Players will defer salary to account for the financial impact of COVID-19.
  • The CBA extension accounts for certain salary cap loopholes. In short, contracts won’t be as front-loaded, salary bonuses won’t be greatly changed, and no-trade clauses will be honored more faithfully.

So, again fans: rejoice, and hold your breath. Maybe cross your fingers, too — especially in hopes that this process happens as safely as possible. This is huge stuff, and PHT will cover the developments as they unfold.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

NHL salary cap to stay flat at $81.5M; bad news for big spenders, free agents

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With the CBA extended through 2025-26 as part of the NHL’s larger return-to-play plan, we now know that the salary cap will remain flat at $81.5 million for at least the 2020-21 NHL season.

From there, most signs point to a snail-like pace for the NHL salary cap ceiling, if it moves at all. Much like many other factors, that’s subject to change. If the NHL’s finances can bounce back quickly from the impact of COVID-19, then who knows?

But … most likely, a flat $81.5M NHL salary cap (and a slowly rising one) looks like bad news for both the league’s biggest spenders and free agents hoping to cash in.

The two sides took these measures to try to mitigate the impact of COVID-19. In trying to roll with those punches, certain sacrifices must be made. And that means that some big market teams will need to tighten their belts, rather than wielding the full power of fat wallets.

Let’s jump into some of the details

Flat $81.5M salary cap for 2020-21 NHL season; Limited movement after that

As a reminder, the 2019-20 salary cap ceiling sits at $81.5M. The NHL’s salary cap could remain flat at $81.5M for some time; it’s penciled in that way for at least 2020-21.

Here’s the breakdown:

  • Upper Limit = $81.5 Million
  • Midpoint = $70.9 Million
  • Lower Limit = $60.2 Million

So, for at least a while, the salary cap will not be tied directly to a 50-50 split in revenue. This is a change from how business operated (and the salary cap was calculated) for NHL teams.

This may only be temporary because the NHL and NHLPA agreed to a point where the salary cap could rise instead of being flat: $4.8 billion in revenue. (That was the projected revenue for 2019-20 before the COVID-19 interruption.)

Granted, there are some ins and outs that might allow minor tweaks, but that’s where things get really granular. If you want to dig deep on the new mechanics that might or might not keep the NHL salary cap flat, check out the full release. Make sure you have your glasses and contacts (and maybe smelling salts).

Flat NHL salary cap could present challenges for plenty of NHL teams, free agents

One would think this might also make it tougher for players to land big second contracts, but we’ll see. Plenty of signs point to a flat/barely climbing salary cap squeezing the NHL’s “middle class” even more than before.

At this point, fans of high-spending teams might beg for “amnesty buyouts.” Unfortunately for those teams, that won’t be a way to get out of salary cap jail.

If the NHL salary cap stays flat or barely moves for years, it could absolutely cause some carnage. Think of how well Seattle could leverage cap-challenged teams during the expansion draft, for example. (You might even pledge that there will be a climate for chaos.)

Salary bonuses, contract terms, and other financial details from NHL CBA extension

Consider the flat $81.5M NHL salary cap the biggest detail of the CBA extension. There are plenty of other elements to consider, including:

  • If all goes to plan, NHL free agency is set for mid-October. Estimates include Oct. 9 or Oct. 11.
  • Players will defer 10 percent of their salaries to make up for pandemic-related financial losses.
  • No-trade and no-movement clauses will “travel” with the player, even if said player gets traded before the clause kicks in. TSN’s Frank Seravalli reminds us of P.K. Subban‘s situation. The Canadiens traded Subban right before his clause kicked in. From there, the Predators weren’t responsible for such a clause, and they eventually traded Subban to the Devils.
  • Salary bonuses will go untouched, which was a sticking point for owners. On the other hand, the NHL took measures to limit “front-loading” contracts.
  • Escrow – a huge sticking point for players, boring for the rest of us — will be limited. The cap for escrow is set at 20 percent for 2020-21, then the plan is to eventually drop it to six percent.
  • The CBA extension very marginally bumps up minimum NHL salaries. Some might say comically so.
  • The CBA extension tweaks cap recapture penalties. Via Michael Russo of the Athletic, there is “no longer a charge greater than the contract’s AAV in any year, but charge continues until the full overage is paid off.”
  • As discussed earlier, prospects like Kirill Kaprizov of the Wild won’t be able to participate in the 2020 Stanley Cup Qualifiers or any part of 2019-20. There is the option, however, to sign them in a way that burns a year off of their entry-level contracts. Sportsnet’s Chris Johnston reports that teams would get a small window to do so (Monday afternoon through Wednesday afternoon), but it’s unclear if they’d be allowed to participate in training camps if such contracts were signed.

Closing thoughts on the NHL having a flat salary cap for 2020-21

Overall, every bargain contract will be that much more crucial, and every mistake will hurt much more. Which teams do you think will weather these storms, and which ones are in big trouble?

Better make sure you have a good capologist or three, NHL teams.

MORE ON THE NHL RETURN TO PLAY

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

NHL announces full schedule for 2020 Stanley Cup Qualifiers

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Now that the NHL’s Return to Play plan has been approved by both sides, it’s time to focus on the games. The 2020 Stanley Cup Qualifiers will begin on Saturday, Aug. 1 in the hub cities of Edmonton and Toronto.

The top four teams in both conference will play a three-game round robin for seeding in the First Round. The Stanley Cup Qualifiers will be best-of-5 series with the losing teams being entered into Phase 2 of the NHL Draft Lottery.

Below is a full schedule of both the round-robin and the Stanley Cup Qualifiers. Television information and start times will be announced at a later date.

EASTERN CONFERENCE (Scotiabank Place)

Round-robin
Sunday, Aug. 2
: Flyers vs. Bruins
Monday, Aug. 3: Capitals vs. Lightning
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Lightning vs. Bruins
Thursday, Aug. 6: Capitals vs. Flyers
Saturday, Aug. 8: Bruins vs. Capitals
Sunday, Aug. 9: Flyers vs. Lightning

(5) Pittsburgh Penguins vs. (12) Montreal Canadiens
Saturday, Aug. 1: Canadiens vs. Penguins
Monday, Aug. 3: Canadiens vs. Penguins
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Penguins vs. Canadiens
Friday, Aug. 7: Penguins vs. Canadiens*
Saturday, Aug. 8: Penguins vs. Canadiens*

(6) Carolina Hurricanes vs. (11) New York Rangers
Saturday, Aug. 1: Rangers vs. Hurricanes
Monday, Aug. 3: Rangers vs. Hurricanes
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Hurricanes vs. Rangers
Thursday, Aug. 6: Hurricanes vs. Rangers*
Saturday, Aug. 8: Rangers vs. Hurricanes*

(7) New York Islanders vs. (10) Florida Panthers
Saturday, Aug. 1: Panthers vs. Islanders
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Panthers vs. Islanders
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Islanders vs. Panthers
Friday, Aug. 7: Islanders vs. Panthers*
Sunday, Aug. 9: Panthers vs. Islanders*

(8) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (9) Columbus Blue Jackets
Sunday, Aug. 2: Blue Jackets vs. Maple Leafs
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Blue Jackets vs. Maple Leafs
Thursday, Aug. 6: Maple Leafs vs. Blue Jackets
Friday, Aug. 7: Maple Leafs vs. Blue Jackets*
Sunday, Aug. 9: Blue Jackets vs. Maple Leafs*

WESTERN CONFERENCE (Rogers Place)

Round-robin
Sunday, Aug. 2: Blues vs. Avalanche
Monday, Aug. 3: Stars vs. Golden Knights
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Avalanche vs. Stars
Thursday, Aug. 6: Golden Knights vs. Blues
Saturday, Aug. 8: Golden Knights vs. Avalanche
Sunday, Aug. 9: Stars vs. Blues

(5) Edmonton Oilers vs. (12) Chicago Blackhawks
Saturday, Aug. 1: Blackhawks vs. Oilers
Monday, Aug. 3: Blackhawks vs. Oilers
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Oilers vs. Blackhawks
Friday, Aug. 7: Oilers vs. Blackhawks*
Saturday, Aug. 8: Blackhawks vs. Oilers*

(6) Nashville Predators vs. (11) Arizona Coyotes
Sunday, Aug. 2: Coyotes vs. Predators
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Coyotes vs. Predators
Wednesday, Aug. 5: Predators vs. Coyotes
Friday, Aug. 7: Predators vs. Coyotes*
Sunday, Aug. 9: Coyotes vs. Predators*

(7) Vancouver Canucks vs. (10) Minnesota Wild
Sunday, Aug. 2: Wild vs. Canucks
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Wild vs. Canucks
Thursday, Aug. 6: Canucks vs. Wild
Friday, Aug. 7: Canucks vs. Wild*
Sunday, Aug. 9: Wild vs. Canucks*

(8) Calgary Flames vs. (9) Winnipeg Jets
Saturday, Aug. 1: Jets vs. Flames
Monday, Aug. 3: Jets vs. Flames
Tuesday, Aug. 4: Flames vs. Jets
Thursday, Aug. 6: Flames vs. Jets*
Saturday, Aug. 8: Jets vs. Flames*

* – if necessary

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.