Report: Players likely to vote to bump up 2016-17 salary cap

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It’s already been hinted at before, but it sounds like the NHLPA will vote in favor of a five-percent escalator for the salary cap in regard to the 2016-17 season.

The precise bump is unclear, yet such a move would mean that the ceiling for each team would rise by a little more than $3 million.

Keep in mind that it’s still not quite official that the players will give it the thumbs up, although it sounds awfully close:

This is a win for fans – more money to retain beloved players/gain a decent new piece, not to mention a little more room for exciting free agency – aside from the possible argument that it could inspire higher ticket prices.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman and the New York Post’s Larry Brooks both report that the escalator would boost the ceiling to $72.8 million.

Here’s the explanation for the range via Brooks:

According to a source with ties to the Players’ Association, the cap — set at $71.4 million this year — would be reduced to approximately $69.3M for 2016-17 unless the PA triggers the 5 percent escalator. If the union does exercise the bump, then the cap should increase to approximately $72.8M. The union, which debated the issue at meetings at the end of the week, has voted for the increase all but once.

That might not sound like a night-and-day difference, although you’d get, say, a Cam Ward‘s worth of extra cap space.

For more on the implications – including why some players bristle at this idea – check out this post.