Five team stats you may find interesting

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Plus-10: The New York Rangers’ goal-differential in the first period. That’s the highest in the league. Just throwing it out there, but surely part of the reason the Rangers have been outshot in so many games is that they’ve been so good at taking early leads. Everyone knows it’s human nature to play more conservatively with a lead. At five-on-five when the score is tied, the Rangers have a plus-23 shot differential, per war-on-ice.com. When they’re leading by any score — and they’ve been in that situation a lot this season — it’s an NHL-worst minus-70.

Minus-22: The Anaheim Ducks’ goal differential in the second period. No team has a worse goal differential in any period. What’s more, the Ducks actually have a positive differential in the first (+5) and third (+3) frames. It’s hard to say why the second has been such a problem for this team. That’s Bruce Boudreau’s problem to figure out. (For now, at least.)

Plus-18: The Montreal Canadiens’ goal differential in the third. No team has a better goal differential in any period. Now, the Habs have also been pretty good in the first (+5) and second (+10). Which is to say, they’ve led a lot of games after 40 minutes. That they’ve kept scoring in the third supports their reputation as one of the best counter-attacking teams in the NHL. When you’re forced to take chances against Montreal, it can turn ugly real quick.

Plus-5: Calgary’s goal differential in three-on-three overtime. Five wins, no losses. That’s our way of saying the Flames have only won three games in regulation.

20: The most games any team has led at some point in the contest, per war-on-ice.com. Can you guess the two teams that have done it? ………… OK, time’s up. The first is Dallas. The Stars have won 17 games, so yeah, it makes sense they’ve led in quite a few of their games. The second team, though, is Boston. The Bruins have only won 12 games, which means they’ve blown a whole lot of leads. This must drive Claude Julien nuts.