Comparing the PP/PK goal-differentials of all 30 teams

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Simple task here. Take the power-play goals each team has scored with the man advantage and subtract the power-play goals it’s surrendered while shorthanded.

A team is going to have a positive ranking if:

— It scores on a high percentage of its power plays and/or kills a high percentage of its shorthanded situations.
— It draws a lot of penalties and/or doesn’t take many penalties.

Note: this doesn’t take into account shorthanded goals. 

The results:

1 CAROLINA 16
1 CHICAGO 16
3 DETROIT 15
4 CALGARY 11
4 ST LOUIS 11
6 WASHINGTON 10
7 PITTSBURGH 9
8 MINNESOTA 8
9 SAN JOSE 7
9 TAMPA BAY 7
11 VANCOUVER 4
12 DALLAS 2
12 NY ISLANDERS 2
14 LOS ANGELES 1
14 NY RANGERS 1
16 NASHVILLE -1
16 OTTAWA -1
18 COLORADO -2
18 MONTREAL -2
18 PHILADELPHIA -2
21 TORONTO -4
22 BOSTON -6
23 EDMONTON -7
23 NEW JERSEY -7
25 COLUMBUS -8
25 WINNIPEG -8
27 FLORIDA -9
28 ANAHEIM -13
29 ARIZONA -15
30 BUFFALO -35


Notes:

— Carolina at the top may surprise some people. But the Hurricanes have an excellent penalty kill, plus they don’t take many penalties. That’s a good combination. It’s even strength that’s hurt the ‘Canes this season. Only three teams — Edmonton, Buffalo, and Arizona — have a worse 5-on-5 ratio.

— If the ultra-disciplined Flames (fewest times shorthanded in the NHL) make the playoffs and the undisciplined Jets (most times shorthanded in the NHL) don’t, what you see above is a big reason why.

— Not a good ranking for the Panthers either. For a bubble team like Florida, special teams can be the difference between making and missing the playoffs.

— Case in point, Vancouver. Not great 5-on-5, the Canucks have had an effective penalty kill (4th) all season, and their much-maligned power play has climbed up to 11th with a recent run of goals.

Related: The Jets should probably knock it off with all the penalties