Habs’ Emelin fined for hit on Gionta

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The NHL’s Department of Player Safety has fined Montreal Canadiens defenseman Alexei Emelin $11,021.51, the maximum allowed under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, for his illegal check to the head of Buffalo Sabres forward Brian Gionta.

The incident occurred during the third period of Buffalo’s 2-1 win over Montreal Friday night.

Emelin and Gionta were teammates for three seasons in Montreal.

The money Emelin was fined goes to the players’ emergency assistance Fund.

The Sabres and Canadiens play the second half of their home-and-home tonight in Montreal.

Lightning needed to ‘feel failure’ before earning Stanley Cup success

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It was 531 days ago that an historic 2018-19 NHL season came to an embarrassing end for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

A 62-win, 128-point campaign was washed away in six days thanks to the Columbus Blue Jackets. An out-of-this-world year from Nikita Kucherov, which saw him win the Hart and Art Ross Trophies, ended without the trophy he really wanted.

The disbelief stretched throughout the hockey world, but hit hardest in the Lightning dressing room.

“I think if we down the road win a Stanley Cup, I’ll be able to reconcile it then,” said head coach Jon Cooper after the series.

Some franchises might have overreacted with rash personnel decisions after such a thud. Tampa general manager Julien BriseBois did not. He had faith in his core. 

“The story of these players, the story of this team, the story of this nucleus of players and of this coaching staff, it’s not over, it’s still being written,” BriseBois said after the Columbus series. “The best and most memorable chapters lie ahead.

“I don’t know when, but I know that when we do it will be all the more sweet because of the disappointments that we will have experienced along our journey to making that happen, including the disappointment that we’re feeling right now because of the outcome of this playoff series.”

[Stamkos joins Lightning for Stanley Cup celebration]

The final chapter was written Monday night as the Lightning closed out the Dallas Stars in six games to win the 2020 Stanley Cup. 

“We’re going to be Stanley Cup champs forever,” said Victor Hedman, who was voted winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy. “Our kids, our grandkids, if they look at the Stanley Cup they’re going to see our names.”

Tampa entered the 2019-20 NHL season with one goal in mind: redemption. They’d been an annual Cup contender and coming off being swept out of the playoffs, the pressure was mounting.

“It’s easy to talk about now,” Cooper said after clinching the Cup Monday night. “In a team sport, I truly believe that failure, you have to feel it before you can have success. … You wear the bumps, you wear the bruises, you wear the heartache, you wear the feelings. You wear it on your sleeve, and it keeps you up at night, but it also drives you. The fear of losing almost becomes greater than the joy of winning.”

Instead of making sweeping changes, BriseBois tinkered. The biggest names moving out last summer were J.T. Miller in a trade with Vancouver, and Anton Stralman, who was allowed to walk in free agency.

BriseBois looked to strengthen his group, not rip it apart. In came Kevin Shattenkirk, looking for a bounce-back season, and Pat Maroon, who had won the Stanley Cup with the St. Louis Blues in 2019. The roster was bolstered in February when Blake Coleman and Barclay Goodrow were acquired in separate trades and Zach Bogosian was signed a free agent.

[Lightning had Cup heroes beyond Conn Smythe winner Hedman]

Their quest was put on hold in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. No one knew if the NHL season would end with a champion. When play resumed in early August, the mission continued for the Lightning.

Tampa cruised through the Return to Play. They won two of their three Round-Robin games, got revenge on the Blue Jackets, and knocked out the Bruins in five games. In the Eastern Conference Final, they dispatched the Islanders in six games.

The Stars stood in their way as the final obstacle. While Dallas took Game 1 of the Cup Final, they would ultimately fall thanks to a revived Lightning power play and Tampa’s best players rising to the occasion and depth additions making an impact.

The Cup celebration on the ice at Rogers Place wasn’t what they played finished their preseason schedule one year ago Monday. They had to enjoy the moment amongst themselves inside a rink without fans. But this is why they made the sacrifice to endure the bubble life for the last two months.

Those six days in April 2019 played a role in this Stanley Cup title. It showed the Lightning that no team is invincible and that the playoff grind is not one to take lightly. They learned that lesson and reset their focus. Now this Tampa Bay Lightning group can call themselves champions.

————

Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Lightning had big Stanley Cup heroes beyond Conn Smythe winner Hedman

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If you’re like me, you’re prone to debate just about every Conn Smythe winner. That tradition continued with Victor Hedman winning the Conn Smythe as the Lightning won the 2020 Stanley Cup. And, as usual, you have to be a real nitpicker to actually get mad about Hedman winning it.

Because, again, Hedman ended up playing a huge role in the Lightning’s success, as the stupendous Swede has done for most of his already-impressive career.

Victor Hedman topped all Lighting players in ice time during their 2020 Stanley Cup run, and logged 25:01 time on ice (with an assist) in that clinching Game 6. Hedman flirted with a point-per-game (10 goals, 22 points in 25 games), a rare run for any skater, let alone a defenseman.

So you’re really splitting hairs by arguing against Hedman. With that, (powers up hair-slitting machine).

Other Lightning Conn Smythe possibilities after Hedman wins it

Brayden Point

TSN’s Frank Seravalli revealed that the Conn Smythe voting ended up being very close between Hedman and Brayden Point.

That’s like, “Two bad NFL wild-card teams who both probably shouldn’t make the playoffs, but one has to,” close.

Point scored the Stanley Cup-winning goal on the power play in Game 6, yet another example of the small forwards oversized clutchness.

Point finished with a whopping 14 goals and 33 points in 23 playoff games. If his injury(injuries?) carried over from the Islanders series, it was tough to tell.

[NBC 2020 STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF HUB]

Interestingly, Point was killer on the power play against the Stars, but otherwise roasted opponents most at even-strength. He generated 26 out of his 33 points when everything was even. In other words, Point often scored points in the toughest situations.

If I were voting, it would have come down to Point and his partner in crime …

Nikita Kucherov

After leading the NHL regular season in scoring during the 2018-19 season, Kucherov topped all point producers during the 2020 Stanley Cup Playoffs. Kucherov grabbed an assist on that Point Cup-clincher, giving him 34 points in 25 games.

Much like Point, it was fair to wonder how healthy Kucherov was during this run. And it was unhealthy for opponents to wonder how much more damage a full-strength Kucherov might have managed.

(Splitting-hairs machine chimes in: that said, if you’re choosing between Point and Kucherov, Kucherov was more assist-heavy [7 G, 27 A]. He also leaned more on the power play than Point.)

( … Speaking of splitting, maybe Kucherov and Point split some votes?)

Andrei Vasilevskiy

Normally, when a goalie manages a .927 save percentage during a Stanley Cup run, that goalie is the talk of the town. Frankly, Vasilevskiy was on the tips of fewer tongues than Stars goalie Anton Khudobin for most (if not all) of the 2020 Stanley Cup Final.

Granted, Khudobin presented a more entertaining underdog story.

Vasilevskiy is as close to “established” as a goalie can get in the modern NHL. He’s the rare contemporary first-rounder. Vasilevskiy boasts prototypical size, and carries the $9.5M cap hit that makes you merely expect great things.

Yet, if you followed goalies, you realize such performances are far from foregone conclusions.

Beyond winning a Stanley Cup, Vasilevskiy pulled off one of the only things he hadn’t done during this run in Game 6: he earned a shutout. Otherwise, his run was almost completely spotless. During a postseason when teams leaned on both of their goalies to an unusual degree, Vasilevskiy played every minute for the Lightning. And they never stared into the brink of elimination during this entire run.

Conn Smythe voters couldn’t have been blamed for choosing Point, Kucherov, or Vasilevskiy, but Hedman was a fantastic choice, too. This rich list of potential winners underscores the Lightning’s daunting power, and is a quick reference as to how they won the Stanley Cup despite Steven Stamkos being limited to about three minutes of playing time.

Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Dallas Stars (TB wins series 4-2)

Stars 4, Lightning 1 (recap)
Lightning 3, Stars 2 (recap)
Lightning 5, Stars 2 (recap)
Lighting 5, Stars 4 [OT] (recap)
Stars 3, Lightning 2 [2OT] (recap)
Lightning 2, Stars 0 (recap)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Stamkos joins Lightning for Stanley Cup celebration

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After controlling Game 6 against the Dallas Stars, the Tampa Bay Lightning won their second Stanley Cup in franchise history. Beyond repeat Stanley Cup champion Patrick Maroon, winning the Stanley Cup was a first for every Lightning player. Considering the road the Lightning traveled to this Stanley Cup victory, should it be surprising that they decided to mix up the celebration, and create a great moment with Steven Stamkos in the process?

As Gary Bettman noted, the Lightning chose to take that group Stanley Cup celebration photo before the trophy was raised.

In an emotional moment, Lightning captain Stamkos ended up on the ice, becoming the first Lightning player to raise the Stanley Cup, prompting a jubilant celebration from teammates. It all makes that lone goal from Game 3 even sweeter for Stamkos.

Great stuff.

Following Stamkos, Conn Smythe Trophy winner Victor Hedman got his chance to raise the Stanley Cup. Some veterans took their laps, while eventually Nikita Kucherov, Andrei Vasilevskiy, and others celebrated with the Stanley Cup.

Along with the players, Jon Cooper and GM Julien BriseBois received a chance to bask in the glory. Both played big roles in the Lightning getting this far (as did former GM Steve Yzerman, now with the Red Wings).

Watch highlights of the Lightning’s 2-0 win against the Stars in Game 6 of the 2020 Stanley Cup Final in the video below:

Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Dallas Stars (TB wins series 4-2)

Stars 4, Lightning 1 (recap)
Lightning 3, Stars 2 (recap)
Lightning 5, Stars 2 (recap)
Lighting 5, Stars 4 [OT] (recap)
Stars 3, Lightning 2 [2OT] (recap)
Lightning 2, Stars 0 (recap)

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Maroon becomes back-to-back Cup winner with Blues, Lightning

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EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) — Patrick Maroon didn’t get the chance this time to lower the Stanley Cup so that his son, Anthony, could kiss it before lifting it again over his shoulders.

Anthony stayed home in the U.S., as did fiancee Francesca as Maroon celebrated with the Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday night as he became a back-to-back NHL champion. A year ago on the ice in Boston, the St. Louis native won the Cup with the Blues, his family by his side.

Maroon had his phone out for the party on the ice in Edmonton after his key steal helped set up the second goal in the 2-0 win that sealed the title.

”Just celebrating with my future wife Francesca and then my family back home,” he explained. ”I thought last year was something else, but this year was something special. I’ve been fortunate enough to be on so many good hockey teams, and to go back to back, most people don’t get the chance to play in a Stanley Cup Finals, I got to do it back to back, and win. I got the chills talking about this.”

According to NHL Stats, Maroon is just the eighth player to win the Cup in back-to-back seasons with different teams and the first since Cory Stillman in 2004 and 2006, sandwiched around the lockout year.

”It’s extremely different,” Maroon said before the final wrapped up, acknowledging the decision for his family not to join him in the bubble. ”It’s kind of been a dream. I’ve been living in a dream, honestly.”

Maroon will be the first player since Claude Lemieux in the 1990s to get his name on the Cup in consecutive years with different teams, and only those two and Stillman have done it since the expansion era began in 1967.

”I’ve been fortunate to play on some really, really good hockey teams,” Maroon said before Game 5. ”I’ve been fortunate to come back to the Stanley Cup Final, even though there’s a lot of guys that play in the league for 10-15 years that only get one opportunity at this thing. I’ve been fortunate to get two whacks at it.

”I’ve been blessed, and without my family and my teammates for all the support, I don’t think it happens.”

If the Blues don’t let Maroon go and the Lightning don’t sign him, maybe none of this happens. Tampa Bay is a different team with him after falling short many years in a row.

Maroon was a late-summer signing a couple of weeks before training camp in the summer of 2019. It was his second consecutive one-year deal, now with his sixth NHL organization, worth $900,000 – roughly half his St. Louis salary.

It has been a perfect fit, even if Maroon hasn’t been as prominent as he was in the Blues’ run, when he scored a series-clinching, double-overtime goal in the second round to eliminate the same Dallas Stars he and the Lightning defeated in the final. But along with trade deadline pickups Barclay Goodrow and Blake Coleman and free agent signings Zach Bogosian and Luke Schenn, Maroon has played a big role in bulking up the Lightning enough to get the job done.

”The M.O. on us and the Lightning over the last few years is that they’re offensive and they’re skilled and the way to beat them is to play them hard,” said Game 4 overtime hero Kevin Shattekirk, also a new addition. ”Things have changed this year.”

Coach Jon Cooper knew Maroon had the potential to change the complexion of the team. He coached Maroon from 2005-07 with Texarkana and St. Louis Bandits of the North American Hockey League, kept in touch over the years and followed his career closely.

Cooper remembers Maroon going from an overweight 17-year-old who had to do extra work to get in shape to a dominant player at that level. Maroon grew into his 6-foot-3, 225-pound frame as a player, grew up as a person and became an NHL regular.

In February, Maroon’s mother was diagnosed with breast cancer – he told NBC she beat it and was healthy – and he was hoping to bring the Cup home to her.

”You never know when you’re going to come back, so you’ve got to take every opportunity and cherish it,” he said.

Maroon dressed in all 25 Tampa Bay games this postseason, providing some much-needed muscle and filling a vital role in front of the net on the power play.

”He’s a good teammate, and he knows his role, so he knows the minutes he’s going to get,” Cooper said. ”I’d give guys roles and make sure they all know what they are, and he knows his. He’s got character, and he is a character. It’s two good attributes to have.”

Watching Maroon play elsewhere, Cooper often ”sneakily” whispered to former Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman, ”Hey Steve, if we got the chance.”

It was new GM Julien BriseBois who got the chance and took it, and now they are all Stanley Cup champions.