Eakins attends Cowboys camp, picks Garrett’s brain

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Prior to getting hired in Edmonton, Dallas Eakins carved himself a niche as an “out of the box” thinker and “innovative” head coach.

Well, his latest move certainly fits that billing.

Last week, the Oilers bench boss dialed up Dallas Cowboys head coach Jason Garrett — whom he’d never met — and asked if he could drop by training camp to see how the NFL club operates.

Garrett obliged, and here’s how it went (per ESPN Dallas):

Eakins reached out to Garrett to see if he could watch a few training camp practices to see how such a big coaching staff works together with hockey staffs growing in number, too. Garrett said Eakins made reference to the mix of the Cowboys’ staff.

Garrett has had a lot of changeover on his Dallas Cowboys coaching staff since taking over full-time in 2011. He has always tried to have a mix of experience and youth on his staff, and this year the ages range from 28 (assistant wide receivers coach Kyle Valero) to 74 (assistant head coach/defense Monte Kiffin).

“One of the first things he said to me is, he sat in a lot of the different meetings and he said ‘There’s unbelievable diversity on your staff — old guys, young guys, guys who have come from different places. Different philosophies, different coaching and teaching styles,'” Garrett said. “We have done that, whether it’s very, very consciously in every decision, I don’t know if that’s the case, but I do believe that’s important. You want to be able to reach the players and touch the players a lot of different ways. If I tried to hire everybody who was exactly like me, that would be a really, really bad thing. If we tried to hire everybody who was exactly like some model, that would be a bad thing. You want to have guys who have different personalities and somehow touch the guys differently. I think we’ve done that. It was interesting to me that he recognized that.”

Edmonton doesn’t have an overly large coaching staff, though it did undergo a significant change this offseason. Two of Eakins’ assistants — Steve Smith and Kelly Buchberger — were replaced by Craig Ramsay and Rocky Thompson; they joined a staff that already included fellow assistant Keith Acton and goalie coach Frederic Chabot.

Thompson and Ramsay are at different ends of the age spectrum, which could explain Eakins’ visit to Texas. Thompson turns 37 this week, was playing professional hockey as recently as 2007 and had just four years of pro coaching experience (as an assistant with AHL Oklahoma City). Ramsay, 63, is a well-traveled veteran; he had head coaching gigs in Buffalo, Philadelphia and Atlanta to go along with assistant/associate jobs in Florida, Ottawa, Tampa Bay and Boston.

Carolina Hurricanes might be busy this weekend

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The Carolina Hurricanes could look a whole lot more different in the coming days than they do right now.

The ‘Canes, who own the second overall pick in the 2018 NHL Entry Draft, are apparently open for business. They have a new head coach in Rod Brind’Amour, a new general manager in Don Wadell and they have a whole bunch of players they’re seemingly willing to move.

The team hasn’t made the postseason in nine years, which a lot for any kind of market but especially a non-traditional hockey one.

New owner Tom Dundon will want to get the ball rolling and the only way to do that is by making changes.

The team has two significant needs. First, they have to find a go-to guy that can shoulder the load offensively. Second, they need to find someone that can stop the puck consistently because Scott Darling‘s first year was mediocre at best.

Waddell has made it clear that winger Andrei Svechnikov will be the second pick in the draft unless they decide to ship the pick elsewhere for immediate help. The ‘Canes have some talented forwards like Sebastian Aho, Jeff Skinner, Teuvo Teravainen and Elias Lindholm, but, as we mentioned, they don’t have a game-breaker that can change the outcome of a game on a dime. Svechnikov can be that guy, or he can be used as a key piece in a trade for that kind of scorer.

If the Hurricanes absolutely want to keep the pick (they should), there’s other ways they can acquire a talented forward. Carolina has an abundance of quality defensemen, so there’s a deal that could be made around Justin Faulk or Noah Hanifin, too. Plenty of teams are looking for help on the back end, which means they could be interested in either player.

And of course, there’s the possibility that they could use some of their own forwards to fill their needs. Skinner’s name has come up more than once in trade circles. The 26-year-old is coming off a season that saw him score 24 goals and 49 points in 82 games. He’s also found the back of the net at least 24 times in four of his last five seasons.

The problem, is that Skinner only has one year remaining on his contract. He’ll make $5.725 million in 2018-19, but based on the numbers he’s put up over the last five years, he should get a raise. Are the Hurricanes comfortable giving him a long-term deal for that kind of cash? That’s a huge factor in the decision they have to make. The challenge is that Skinner has a full no-move clause in his current deal.

No matter what management decides to do, there’s no denying that this is a huge week for the Hurricanes. They’ve got cap space, assets to trade and some huge holes to fill. Getting that fan base excited again has to be a huge priority, and they have a good opportunity to make that happen with a couple of key transactions.

They can’t afford to whiff on this golden opportunity.

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

PHT Morning Skate: On Sabres’ draft struggles; Chiarelli’s to-do list

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• With the draft just over a day away, Sportsnet’s Jeff Marek breaks down his mock draft. Where will the Habs go at number three? (Sportsnet)

• You can compare Marek’s mock draft to McKeen’s lead prospect writer Ryan Wagman’s mock draft. Both Marek and Wagman have the same top three prospects, but things change starting at number four. (Rotoworld)

• Hall of Famer Bob Gainey was named adviser of the OHL Peterborough. That’s where Gainey spent two years of his junior career back in the 1970s. (NHL.com)

• The Toronto Maple Leafs signed Connor Carrick to a one-year extension on Wednesday. He spent most of last season in the press box. (Pension Plan Puppets)

• This reddit user lost an in-game bet, so he had to write a 25-page essay on why Caps defenseman Brooks Orpik will be a hall of famer. (RMNB)

• The Detroit Red Wings won’t be extending a qualifying offer to free-agent forward Martin Frk. (Detroit Free Press)

• One of the reasons the Sabres have been so bad for so long, is because they’ve struggled to find steals in the later rounds of drafts. (Buffalo Hockey Beat)

• If the Canucks keep the seventh overall pick, should they take Noah Dobson or Evan Bouchard? Canucks Army explains why they’d take Dobson. (Canucks Army)

• The Golden Knights have become the envy of the NHL because they’re one of the better teams in the league and because they have a lot of cap space. (SinBin.Vegas)

• What should Oilers GM Peter Chiarelli be looking to accomplish in the next three days? Well, he can start by drafting a solid player at 10th overall and he can try to sign Darnell Nurse to a bridge deal. (Oilers Nation)

• Up top, check out the moment when Taylor Hall found out he won the Hart Trophy.

• And if you missed it, you’re going to want to see the Humboldt Broncos reunion at the NHL Awards:

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

All-Rookie, All-Star Teams and rest of 2018 NHL Awards

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Let’s recap the remaining winners from the 2018 NHL Awards. Before we do so, here are the other big winners and corresponding links.

Hart Trophy

Taylor Hall

GM of the Year

George McPhee

Vezina Trophy

Pekka Rinne

Selke Trophy

Anze Kopitar

Jack Adams Award

Gerard Gallant

Norris Trophy

Victor Hedman

Calder Trophy

Mathew Barzal

Bill Masterton Trophy

Brian Boyle

Ted Lindsay

Connor McDavid

Lady Byng

William Karlsson

Also:

P.K. Subban named cover star for “NHL 19.”

Humboldt Broncos reunite to honor late coach Darcy Haugan (Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award).

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Now, let’s jump into the remaining awards and honors.

Mark Messier Leadership Award

Deryk Engelland (see video above this post’s headline)

King Clancy

Daniel and Henrik Sedin

William Jennings

Jonathan Quick with Jack Campbell

Of course, Alex Ovechkin won the Maurice Richard Trophy and Connor McDavid took the Art Ross.

First NHL All-Star Team

Left Wing: Taylor Hall
Center: Connor McDavid
Right Wing: Nikita Kucherov
Defense: Drew Doughty and Victor Hedman
Goalie: Pekka Rinne

Second NHL All-Star Team

Left Wing: Claude Giroux
Center: Nathan MacKinnon
Right Wing: Blake Wheeler
Defense: Seth Jones and P.K. Subban
Goalie: Connor Hellebuyck

All-Rookie Team

Forwards: Clayton Keller, Brock Boeser, and Mathew Barzal
Defense: Charlie McAvoy and Will Butcher
Goalie: Juuse Saros

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Humboldt Broncos reunite to honor late head coach

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Ten members of the Humboldt Broncos reunited on Wednesday night during the 2018 NHL Awards in Las Vegas. The survivors of the April 6 bus crash that killed 16 players and staff were on stage to help give out the first Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award to their late head coach Darcy Haugan.

The award, presented “to an individual who – through the game of hockey – has positively impacted his or her community, culture or society,” was voted on by the public after fans submitted candidates, and the field was then narrowed down to three finalists.

From the NHL:

Haugan left a lasting impact in Humboldt, Sask., as well as every other community that was fortunate enough to have him as a resident or involved in junior hockey. He changed the lives of many of his players, always being there for each one of them and never hesitating to give them a second chance. He fought for his team and had their backs – he was the coach and mentor everybody wanted. Haugan believed strongly that the game is not about making hockey players; it is about making amazing human beings. He did just that, building up young leaders who also developed strong hockey skills along the way. His presence would fill the room and his love for the game was undeniable. Haugan died doing what he loved, surrounded by the young people he dedicated his life to. Haugan left behind, in all of those he touched, his spirit and passion for the game, his love for his beautiful family, and his example of dedication to his community.

Haugan’s wife, Christina, accepted the award in his honor.

The other finalists were Debbie Bland of the Etobicoke Dolphins Girls Hockey League and Neal Henderson of the Fort Dupont Hockey Club.

The NHL Foundation is donating $10,000 in Haugan’s memory to the Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association, a charity important to the coach.

On Tuesday, the NHL and NHLPA announced that Washington Capitals forward Chandler Stephenson will bring the Stanley Cup to Humboldt on Aug. 24 that will involve a skills competition at the Broncos’ home rink.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.